INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg.

One Thousand Books, Manuscripts, and Collections
Relating to Arabia and the Middle East


 

1 Adam, Robert. The Religious World Displayed; or, A View of the Four Grand Systems of Religion, Judaism, Paganism, Christianity, and Mohammedism; and of the various existing denominations, sects and parties, in the Christian world. To which is subjoined, a view of deism and atheism. Edinburgh, James Ballantyne and Co., 1809. 8vo. 3 vols. Contemp. giltstamped calf with double giltstamped black spine labels; spines gilt; giltstamped borders to covers.
  € 1,000
First edition of this encompassing study by the Rev. Robert Adam (1770-1825), long a standard work on the world's religions. - A prettily bound set from the library of the British philosopher of religion, David Arthur Pailin (b. 1936), with his bookplate. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 1615651.Cf. Chauvin XII, 53 (later edition 1823).
 

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Inscribed copy
2 Ahmed Hassan, Hafiz. Pilgrimage to the Caaba and Charing Cross. London, W. H. Allen & Co., [1871]. 8vo. VIII, 174, 8, (2) pp. With mounted photoportrait frontispiece. Original elaborately giltstamped forest green cloth. All edges red.
  € 2,800
First and only edition; inscribed copy. The author worked in the service of the Nawab (sovereign) of Tonk, in Hindustan. A Muslim, the Nawab in January 1870 received permission to make the pilgrimage to Mecca. Ahmed Hassan accompanied him, and his account includes details of the crossing from Bombay to Jeddah, of the visits to Mecca and Medina, and of the continuation of his journey to England. The account is uncommon. - Occasional minute foxing to interior, otherwise a very fine copy in well-preserved original binding. Inscribed by the author on t. p.: "With the author's compliments". (more)
  ¶ OCLC 4384569. Not in Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula.
 

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3 Aitchison, Charles Umpherston. A Collection of Treaties, Engagements, and Sunnuds, Relating to India and Neighbouring Countries. Calcutta, Savielle and Cranenburgh, J. L. Kingham, & O. T. Cutter, 1862-1865. Large 8vo. 7 vols. With 4 large folding maps in colour. Contemp. cloth with giltstamped title to spine.
  € 9,500
Complete set of the first edition as issued by 1865. An index volume (not present here) was appended in 1866, but is not part of the basic series. Comprises: (vol. 1) Bengal, Burmah, and the Eastern Archipelago; (vol. 2) N.W. Provinces, Oudh, Nipal, the Punjah and the states on the Punjah frontier; (vol. 3) Peishwa, Nagpore and Bundelcund; (vol. 4) Rajpootana, Central, India, and Malwa; (vol. 5) Hyderabad, Mysore, Coorg, the Madras Presidency and Ceylon; (vol. 6) the states within the Bombay Presidency; (vol. 7) Sindh, Beloochiston, Persia, and Herat, Turkish Arabia and the Persian Gulf, and the Arabian and African coasts. This final volume is especially fascinating for recording numerous treaties made with the tribes of the Arabian Gulf - the territory of Bahrain and the so-called "Maritime Tribes" of the Arabian coast. We find here the convention between Sheikh Mahomed bin Khulefa, ruler of Bahrain, to "abstain from all maritime aggressions of every description [...], so long as I receive the support of the British Government in the maintenance of the security of my own possessions", a treaty with the "pacificated" Arab tribes of the Gulf, describing (and picturing in colour!) the red flag they will use, and a treaty with "Sheikh Shabout of Abou Dabyee" to deliver all "vessels of the piratical powers" to General William Keir. Significantly, the contemporary rulers and their territories (e.g. "Rasool Khyma", "Shargah", "Amalgavine", "Dubey", "Ejman", and "Abouthabee") are noted by name. The treaties, mainly translated from the original Arabic, paint a remarkable picture of the political relations between the British and the small, independent tribes who ruled the coast during the mid-19th century. - Slight wear to extremities. Removed from the Public Libraries of Newcastle-upon-Tyne with their bookplates on front pastedown. Complete sets of the present first edition are of the utmost rarity, the Burell copy (with only 2 maps present) commanded £6,000 more than a decade ago (Sotheby's, Oct 14, 1999, lot 34). (more)
  ¶ BM Supplement, 1966-70, vol I, 33 (257). OCLC 29119267. Cf. Macro 18 (later eds. only). pkpk

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Eight years a slave in Tunis
4 (Albertus, Fr[iedrich] Gottl[ieb]). Die merkwürdige Lebensbeschreibung des unglücklich reisenden Uhrmachergesellen, welcher acht Jahre in der türkischen Sklaverey unter vielen Jammer und Elend zugebracht und endlich erlöst wurde. No place or printer, [c. 1806]. 8vo. (16) pp. Modern marbled wrappers.
  € 2,500
Extremely rare German slavery account by the Prussian clockmaker F. G. Albertus. Born in Potsdam in 1770, he visited Amsterdam in 1797, was press-ganged into joining an East India Company ship bound for Batavia, but fell into the hands of Tunisian pirates off the coast of Gibraltar. He details the horrors of his eight-year slavery in North Africa and mentions several of his fellow sufferers by name, including a Spanish Countess named Carolina who was captured at age 16 and was finally ransomed after nine years of slavery. Ultimately, Albertus is ransomed by a Dutch jeweller named Birkenthal and returns to Germany, physically broken but full of praise for the workings of God. - Trimmed rather closely (slight loss to text). Title page bears contemporary censorship stamp of the Delitzsch police. Of the utmost rarity: a single other copy is known (bound within sammelband A/31581:9 in the State and University Library of Hamburg). (more)
  ¶ OCLC 837821535 (SUB Hamburg).
 

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Vespucci, and the Arabian Gulf
5 Albertus Magnus. De natura locoru[m]. Libru[m] mira eruditio[n]e & singulari fruge refertu[m], & iam primu[m], summa dilige[n]tia revisum [...]. (Vienna, Hieronymus Vietor & Johannes Singriener für Leonhard & Lukas Alantsee, 1514). 4to. (104) pp. With woodcut title border and full-page woodcut arms of Emperor Maximilian I on verso of final leaf. Papered spine.
  € 8,500
Very rare first edition of Albert's general description of the earth, marking the inauguration of scientific geography as an independent discipline and the first attempt at a comparative geography. Edited by the Bavarian mathematician, astronomer and astrologer Georg Tannstetter, who was mainly active in Vienna. "Interesting to the American collector on account of a marginal note relating to Vespuccius, which seems to have been inserted with movable type, on the recto of the last leaf in signature d, after the book had been printed" (Sabin). The contemporary owner, too, has highlighted the name by a marginal ms. note, "Vespucius". Also treats the Middle East with the "sinus Persicus" and "sinus Arabicus" (f. J4r). At the end, Tannstetter provides a brief list of unprinted works by Albertus, to which the contemporary owner has added "De vegetabilis et plantis". - Binding somewhat loosened near beginning; upper edge of title page remargined. Several contemporary marginalia. Occcasional light fingerstaining, but altogether clean and well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ VD 16, A 1345. IA 102.526. Alden/L. 514/1. Sabin 671. JCB I, 58. Harrisse 76.
 

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The first European to enter the Arabian Gulf
6 Albuquerque, Afonso de. Commentarios do Grande Afonso Dalboquerque, Capitao geral que foy das Indias Orientales, em tempo do moito poderoso Rey dom Manuel, o primeiro deste nome. Novemente emendados & acrescentados pelo mesmo auctor. Lisbon, Joao de Barreira, 1576. Folio (271 x 200 mm). 578 pp. With woodcut coat-of-arms on title page and two small woodcuts in the text. Recent full vellum binding with gilt borders on sides and gilt compartments on spine.
  € 75,000
Second edition, excessively rare and "plus correcte et plus estimée que la première" (Palha). Afonso d' Albuquerque (1453-1515), the Great, was one of the most striking personalities in the history of Portuguese discovery and colonialism and is the founder of the Portuguese Empire in the East Indies. Albuquerque advanced the three-fold Portuguese grand scheme of combatting Islam and securing the trade of spices and the establishment of a vast Portuguese Asian empire. He was the first European to enter the Persian Gulf, led the first voyage by a European fleet into the Red Sea, and was also the first westerner to reach the coast of South-Eastern Arabia: "In 1506 Albuquerque was despatched from Lisbon on an expedition, intended to consolidate Portuguese supremacy in the Indian Ocean. His instructions were to monopolize trade with East India for portugal, and to exclude both Venetians and Saracens from Indian waters [...] Attacks were made on the Arab ports at Malindi, Hoja, Lamu and Brava, before continuing to Socotra [...] Sailing from Socotra with six ships, Albuquerque coasted the Arabian peninsula, sacked Muscat and Sohar, and then launched an attack on Hormuz during the months of September and October 1507. In spite of the overwhelming forces assembled against him by the island's twelve-year-old ruler, Albuquerque mounted a successful siege, with the result that the ruler become a vassal of the Portuguese crown [...] The famous 'Commentaries' [...] were published by his son Alfonso [...], collected from his father's papers. The only documents actually originating from the father are in the form of letters" (Howgego I, 19-21). - Of the utmost rarity: only the 1774 edition is recorded in ABPC. The only copy of the present edition in the trade so far was the one sold by Reiss in 1989 (Auction 40, Travel and Exploration, lot 395). - Provenance: Acquired from the collection of Dom Diogo de Bragança, Marquês de Marialva (1930-2011), with his bookplate on front pastedown. Formerly in the library of Miguel de Faria with his gilt supralibros on front cover. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 29 (1774 ed. only). Adams A 568. Howgego I, 21. Anselmo 222. King Manuel No. 155. BM-Portuguese Books 127. Innocencio I, 7, 36. Palha 4136. Cat. Gulbenkian, Portugal & Persia, 126. Henze I, 35ff. Brunet I, 144.
 

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The first European to enter the Arabian Gulf
7 Albuquerque, Afonso de. Commentarios do Grande Afonso Dalboquerque, Capitao geral que foi das Indias Orientaes, em tempo do moito poderoso Rey D. Manuel, o primeiro deste nome. Parte I (-III). Lisbon, na Regia Officina Typografica, 1774. 8vo. 3 vols. Contemp. brown calf with giltstamped green spine labels. Leading edges gilt; marbled endpapers. All edges sprinkled in red.
  € 4,500
Third edition, reprinted for the first time after the 1576 edition. Afonso d' Albuquerque (1453-1515), the Great, was one of the most striking personalities in the history of Portuguese discovery and colonialism and is the founder of the Portuguese Empire in the East Indies. Albuquerque advanced the three-fold Portuguese grand scheme of combating Islam and securing the trade of spices and the establishment of a vast Portuguese Asian empire. He was the first European to enter the Persian Gulf, led the first voyage by a European fleet into the Red Sea, and was also the first westerner to reach the coast of South-Eastern Arabia: "In 1506 Albuquerque was despatched from Lisbon on an expedition, intended to consolidate Portuguese supremacy in the Indian Ocean. His instructions were to monopolize trade with East India for Portugal, and to exclude both Venetians and Saracens from Indian waters [...] Attacks were made on the Arab ports at Malindi, Hoja, Lamu and Brava, before continuing to Socotra [...] Sailing from Socotra with six ships, Albuquerque coasted the Arabian peninsula, sacked Muscat and Sohar, and then launched an attack on Hormuz during the months of September and October 1507. In spite of the overwhelming forces assembled against him by the island's twelve-year-old ruler, Albuquerque mounted a successful siege, with the result that the ruler become a vassal of the Portuguese crown [...] The famous 'Commentaries' [...] were published by his son Alfonso [...], collected from his father's papers. The only documents actually originating from the father are in the form of letters" (Howgego I, 19-21). - A good, clean copy. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula 29. Howgego I, 21. Anselmo 222. King Manuel No. 155. BM-Portuguese Books 127. Innocencio I, 7, 36. Palha 4136. Cat. Gulbenkian, Portugal & Persia, 126. Henze I, 35ff. Brunet I, 144. Cf. Graesse I, 59 (4 vols).
 

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8 (Ali Albencufian) [i.e., Miguel de Luna]. Histoire veritable contenant la vie de Iacob Almançor Roy d'Arabie, qui conquist le Royaume d'Espagne sur le Roy Dom Roderic. Paris, Gervais Clousier, 1638. 8vo. 174 pp. With engr. title vignette. 19th-c. half calf with giltstamped title to panelled spine. Marbled endpapers.
  € 2,500
First French edition of the life of Almansor, the Arabic conqueror and ruler of Spain in the tenth century. Translated from "La Verdadera Historia del Rey Rodrigo" by Gilles de Rainssant. The author, the Moorish apologist Miguel de Luna, first published this historical work in two parts in 1592 and 1600. Although presented as a translation from an Arabic manuscript, it was almost certainly of his own composition. It is important as a sympathetic account of the Moorish conquest of Spain and offers numerous accounts of the humanity and cultivation of an Arabic prince. His pre-eminence in science and learning is dwelt upon, and there is an interesting account of the formation of his vast library: he is said to have offered twice the market value for any book he found wanting from his collections. This rare French edition marks an early and remarkable point in the emergent French interest in the Arab world. - Slight browning throughout. Bookplate of Eugène Vignat (1815-95), Mayor of Orléans and Député of Lorient. A good copy. Rare. (more)
  ¶ Goldsmith A 275. OCLC 771039115. Not in Barbier. Not in Brunet.
 

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9 'Abd al-Basit ibn Musá `Almawi / Sauvaire, H[enri]. Description de Damas. Traductions de l'Arabe. Paris, Imprimerie Nationale, 1895-1896. 8vo. 2 parts in 1 vol. (4), 318 pp. (4), 441, (1) pp. Modern red half morocco with giltstamped spine title; original blue printed wrappers bound within.
  € 1,500
First edition in book form ("Extrait du Journal Asiatique, 9. sér., v. 3-7, 1894-96"). The French scholar Henri Sauvaire (1849-96), a leading photographer and numismatic collector, served as a Consul in Damascus and Casablanca. He spent the last years of his life writing on Arab culture. In 1864 he embarked on translating into French the "Description of Damascus" by Abd al-Basit al-Amawi, who lived in Damascus in the mid-16th century (d. 1573/4). - Rare and well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 23427282.
 

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A famous tract against Islam
10 [Alphonsus de Spina. Fortalicium fidei contra iudeos saracenos aliosq[ue] christiane fidei inimicos]. Lyon, Guillaume Balsarin, 22. V. 1487. Small folio (195 x 275 mm). Gothic type, 2 cols., 51 lines. 246 (instead of 249) unnumbered ff. (a*3-8 [instead of 8], a-r8, s-v6, A-K8, L2-7 [instead of 8], wanting final blank). With a woodcut in the text on fol. a2r; printer's device at the end. Several unsophisticated initials supplied in ink by a former owner. 18th century brown calf with giltstamped spine label, attractively gilt spine.
  € 6,500
The "Fortalitatium fidei", the principal work (written c. 1458) of the baptized Spanish Jew de Spina, is considered the "methodical and ideological foundation of the Inquisition. The book, divided into five chapters, targets chiefly Jews and Muslims" (cf. LMA I, 408f.). Of the five books, "the first [is] directed against those who deny the Divinity of Christ, the second against heretics, the third against the Jews, and the fourth against Islam and the Muslims, while the fifth book treats of the battle to be waged against the Gates of Hell. In this last book the author dwells at length upon the demons and their hatred of men; the powers they have over men and the diminution of these powers, owing to the victory of Christ on the Cross, the final condition of the demons, etc." (Catholic Encyclopaedia). "Ouvrage fort curieux de ce théologien espagnol [...] il était dit-on d'origine juive, c'est pour cela que son 'Fortalicium' pèut ètre classé dans une bibliothèque kabbalistique" (Caillet). - Binding rubbed, hinges beginning to split. Wants first two leaves, final blank and counter-leaf L1. Some waterstaining and soiling near beginning and end, some slight edge defects. Bookplate of the great French anthropologist and anatomist Paul Broca to pastedown. (more)
  ¶ HC 874*. Goff A-542. GW 1577. Proctor 8575. BMC VIII, 277. Polain 159. Pellechet 564. Coumont (Witchcraft) S84.4. Cf. Caillet 10306 ("Incunable gothique rare", only 16th-c. eds.).
 

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11 Alquie, Francois-Savinien d'. Les mémoires du voyage de Monsieur le marquis de Ville au Levant, ou l'histoire curieuse du siège de Candie. Amsterdam, Boom, 1670-1671. 12mo. 3 parts in 1 vol. (10), 60, 153 (but: 453), 320 pp. Contemp. vellum.
  € 3,850
First complete French edition. The account of the siege of the fortress of Candia, Crete, based on the reports of Giovanni Battista Rostagno, secretary to Duke Charles Emmanuel II of Milan, was first published in Italian in 1668. The engraved title page depicts the siege of Candia. - Ownership of the Swedish nobleman Corfitz Christian count Beck-Friis (dated Stockholm, 1876); unobtrusive ownership stamp to title page. Last in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer (his ms. ownership to endpaper; dated Zuroch, 28 March 1992). (more)
  ¶ Atabey 17. Cioranescu 7075. Weber II, 347. Cf. Willems 1844.
 

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Illustrated by Jacques Callot
12 Amico da Gallipoli, Bernadino. Trattato delle piante & immagini de sacri edifizi di Terra Santa. Florence, Pietro Cecconcelli, (1619)-1620. Folio (205 x 295 mm). (8), 65, (1) pp. With engr. title page, large woodcut printer's device on reverse of final f., and 34 double-page-sized etchings by Jacques Callot, printed from 38 plates, with 46 numbered illustrations. Contemp. limp vellum with ms. title "Amico" to spine. All edges red.
  € 5,000
Second edition, the first to be illustrated by Callot. All etchings are in their first state, with typographical text on the reverse. Colophone dated "M.DC.XIX". The etchings are numbered 1-41 and 43-47. "Mariette parle de cette série dans ses 'Notes Manuscrites' (Paris, Cabinet des Estampes). Ces planches, dit-il, sont gravée d'une manière très ferme et le peu de figures qui s'y rencontrent sont des mieux qu'ait faites Callot" (Lieure). Includes a view and a plan of Jerusalem, views of buildings with many details and ground plans unsurpassed for centuries, according to Tobler. - A good copy with slight foxing to margins. Top spine end slightly bumped; modern endpapers. Loss of upper corner to p. 53 (fig. 41), remargined using the respective page of another copy without illustrations on verso (slight loss to etched border; some gluestaining). Several contemporary marginalia; ms. notes to endpapers; ms. index et the end. Bound first is a large, folding engraved map of the eastern Mediterranean with insets of Palestine and Jerusalem, engraved by Nicolas Sanson: "Iesu Christi Salvatoris Nostri et Apostolorum Petri, et Pauli Mansiones, Itinera, Peregrinationes &c. per Galilaeam, Samariam, Iudaeam; et per Aegyptum, Asiam, Europam" (from: Sanson, Geographia Sacra. Paris, Mariette, 1665). Ms. ownership "Mompre et Moucheron" on reverse. (more)
  ¶ STC 29. Cicognara 3932. Atabey 20. Blackmer 31. Kat. der Ornamentstichslg. Berlin 2782. Pollen I, 24. Fowler 19. Röhricht 837. Tobler 87. Laor 940 & 941. Plan 220-254. Meaume 4455-4489. Lieure 306-352. Sanson's map: Laor 697. Graesse I, 101.
 

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Portuguese classic of Arabian travel
13 Andrade, Jacinto Freyre de. [Vida de Dom Ioao de Castro, Quarto Visorey da India.] Vida de D. Ioam de Castro, Quarto Viso-Rey da India. Lisbon, Ioam da Costa f. Antonio Leite, 1671. Folio. (8), 380 pp. With additional engr. t. p., engr. portrait frontispiece, and full-page woodcut in the text; several woodcut vignettes and initials. 18th century calf with giltstamped label to gilt spine.
  € 8,500
Second edition (first published in 1651). "Cette biographie est un des livres classiques de la langue portugaise" (Brunet). Includes an account of the battles at Ormuz between the Turks and the Arabs. Dom João de Castro (1500-48) was a naval officer and later Viceroy of Portuguese India. In 1538 he embarked on his first voyage to India, arriving at Goa and immediately proceeding to the defence of Diu. Castro was responsible for the overthrow of Mahmud, King of Gujarat whose interests threatened Portuguese control of the Goan coast. His voyages frequently took him to the coasts of Arabia, and his present biography contains many details about the Peninsula, especially about Aden and the sea route to Mecca. Castro died in Goa in 1548 and was initially buried there, but his remains were later exhumed and transferred to Portugal. - Some fingerstaining at the beginning, otherwise fine. Contemporary ms. ownerships to printed title page and flyleaf. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 21568157. Brunet I, 263. Cf. Atabey 462. BM 9: 1024 (241). Salva 3448. Not in Blackmer. pkpk
 

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14 Andreae, Samuel (praes.) / Jordis, Johann Philipp (resp.). Disquisitio historico-physica de sepulcro Muhammedis. Marburg, Salamon Schadewitz, 1680. 4to. 32 pp. Modern green morocco.
  € 1,500
Second edition of this dissertation about the grave of the Prophet Muhammad, first published in 1677, including a description of the location of Mecca (where the grave was believed to be situated) and an account of the Prophet's body being preserved in a box of iron, levitated in mid-air by magnetic forces. - The Danzig-born theologian Samuel Andreae (1640-99) had taught Greek, Philosophy, Rhetorics, and History before settling at the Hessian university of Marburg, where he served as professor of Theology and head of the university library. Several of his academic works offer a historical slant on Biblical topics. The physician Johann Philipp Jordis (1658-1721/25) studied in Utrecht and practised in Frankfurt from 1685 onwards. - Browned throughout due to paper. No copy in America, according to OCLC. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 12:142174N. OCLC 67857720.
 

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15 Andreossy, [Antoine François]. Constantinople et le Bosphore de Thrace, pendant les années 1812, 1813 et 1814, et pendant l'année 1826, avec un atlas composé de six planches gravées, et de quatre paysages lithographiés. Paris, Théophile Barrois & Benj. Duprat, J. S. Merlin, 1828. 8vo. (4), XLIV, 525, (1) pp. Contemp. half calf with giltstamped spine title. With the folio atlas: 6 engr. maps and plans and 4 lithogr. views. Contemp. half calf over marbled boards, with original printed wrapper cover on upper cover.
  € 4,500
First edition, text and atlas together. Descended from a family of canal builders, Antoine François Conte Andreossi (1761-1828) served at the French embassy in Constantinople from 1811 to 1814, when he was recalled to France by Louis XVIII, much to the dismay of the local French community. Some of the plates show his beloved waterways and fountains; they also include a view of the Hippodrome and Mosque of Sultan Ahmed. - Slight worming to hinges of atlas; old stamp to first engraved plates. Bookplate of Dr. Th. Weber (no. 518). (more)
  ¶ Atabey 22. Blackmer 33. Weber I, 154f. Brunet I, 276. Graesse I, 122. Not in Aboussouan.
 

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Early Life of the Prophet
16 Andrés, Juan. De zeer wonderlijcke ende warachtighe historie van Mahomet. Inde welcke beschreven ende verhaelt wordt zijn gheboorte, afcomste, leven ende valsche leeringhe, mette confutatie oft wederlegginge van den Alcoran ende quade secte des selfs Mahomet [...]. Antwerp, Guillaem van Parijs, 1580. 8vo. 149, (9) ff, with half-page woodcut of Muhammad and his followers on title page and full-page woodcut printer's device on final leaf. 17th century embossed vellum with manuscript title on spine, sprinkled edges.
  € 28,000
Extremely rare first edition of this early Dutch "Life of Muhammad", illustrated with a woodcut of the bearded Prophet preaching to three prostrate devotees. Authored anonymously by "G. S.", the work suggests an unusual European interest in the founder of Islam - at a particularly tense moment in relations between the West and the Islamic World, shortly after the Battle of Lepanto in 1571. It is formidably rare, and is not recorded at Anglo-American or German auctions in the last 50 years. - As the title suggests, the present work was designed to offer a "very remarkable and true History of Muhammad, in which is described and treated his birth, lineage, life and teachings". Although ostensibly a translation of an earlier 16th century work by the Spanish Muslim-turned-Christian Juan Andrés, the "Warachtighe Historie van Mahomet" is in fact a skillful re-working of Andrés meant to focus the reader's attention on the central figure of Muhammad, rather than on the religion itself. Comparison of the present text with the Spanish original indicates that it is in fact based only loosely on Andrés's text. Instead, the "Warachtighe Historie van Mahomet" presents Muhammad's life in detail before discussing, for example, his status as a prophet and the miracles worked by him. Its dozens of chapter headings, as a glance at the table of contents shows, almost all explicitly center around Muhammad himself: "The Jews of Medina argue against Muhammad"; "Muhammad's Men take the City of Mecca"; "Muhammad comes to the aid of Heraclius against the King of Persia"; etc. The "History of Muhammad" continues through to his illness and death, as well as a few chapters on his successors Abu Bakr and Umar (fol. 90). An overview of the contents of the Qur'an is also given (fols. 91-95), and a lengthy dialogue is reproduced in full between the rabbi Abdias Ben Shalom (subsequently known as Abdallah Ibn Shelem) and Muhammad, who eventually converts the Jew - a passage found at the end of the Qur'an. Whatever his motives, the composer of the present Dutch "translation" evidently had a remarkably keen interest in the historical personage of Muhammad, and it is the Prophet's life and deeds which become the focus of the narrative. - As Vincente Cantarino notes, "after the middle of the fifteenth century, and as a direct consequence of the Ottoman expansion in eastern Europe, there was a resurgence of the medieval interest in the composition of treatises dealing with and arguing against the religion of Islam" (p. 27). The most important western work on Islam during this period was undoubtedly Juan Andrés's "Confusion de la Secta Mahometica y d'l Alcora". Andrés, who had only converted in 1487, was unique among early Christian writers on Islam. "The authority that the author commanded was due in part to the fact that he had been a Muslim alfaqui and had become a priest and a missionary after his conversion to Christianity" (p. 28). Of Andrés's early life we know very little: "His father, Abdala, was an alfaqui in the same city. His education was strictly religious and that he seems to have known the Koran well and been familiar with the Sunna, Sira, and Koran commentators" (ibid). To date, Andrés's work has received only cursory attention in the relevant literature, and the present "translation" seems so rare that it is virtually unknown to scholars. With its curiously explicit focus on Muhammad, however, this Dutch adaptation reveals much about northern European attitudes towards a Muslim enemy they had never encountered in the flesh, and is certainly worthy of further scholarly research in itself. - Lengthy closed tear on leaf 80 not affecting the legibility of the text; otherwise a very good copy, pages clean and fresh. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin XI, no. 524 (tentatively attributed to Esquivel de Alava). Belgica Typographica 7197. OCLC 68838554. USTC 407827 (5 copies, 3 in Antwerp). Not mentioned in John Tolan, "European Accounts of Muhammad's Life", in The Cambridge Companion to Muhammad. - On Andres' original work cf. Vincente Cantarino, "From Spoken to Written Language and Back: Some cultural considerations on Hispano-Arabic phonetics", in: Perspectives on Arabic Linguistics VI, pp. 25-36; and Ryan Szpiech, "Preaching Paul to the Moriscos: The Confusión o confutación de la secta Mahomética y del Alcorán (1515) by Juan Andrés", in: La Coronica 41.1 (2012), pp. 317-343.
 

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17 Angèlio da Barga (Bargaeus), Pietro. [Syrias.] Hierosolyma hoc est expeditio illa celeberrima Christianorum principum, qua Goffredo Bulione duce à Turcarum tyrannide Hierusalem liberatur. Florence, Giovanni Donato, Bernardino Giunta, & Soc., 1616. 4to. (26), 496, (2) pp. With woodcut printer's device to t. p. and several historiated initials. Contemp. limp vellum with ms. spine title "Carmina Barge".
  € 2,800
Epic poem on the events of the first crusade (1486-99), led by Godfrey of Bouillon. The work was written at almost the same time as Tasso's like-themed "Gerusalemme Liberata": while this is the first edition under the title "Hierosolyma", it was actually already published in Paris in 1582 (bks. 1-2) and 1584 (bks. 3-4), then in Rome in 1585 (bks. 1-6), and finally, in all 12 books, separately in 1591 under the title "Syrias" (cf. Brunet I, 288). Petrus Angelus Bargaeus (1517-92) was a scholar and professor at the universities of Pisa and Rome. - Rather strong brownstaining, occasional waterstaining. Some contemporary underlining and ms. line-numbers supplied throughout. OCLC locates single copy in America (Houghton Library, Harvard). (more)
  ¶ BMC 5:448. NUC 16.619. Bruni/Evans 232. OCLC 82107113. Cf. Brunet I, 288.
 

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The Nile Flooding and the Plague in Egypt
18 Antes, John. Observations on the Manners and Customs of the Egyptians, the Overflowing of the Nile and its Effects. London, Stockdale, 1800. 4to. 139, (5) pp. With folding engr. map. Later cloth.
  € 850
First edition. - Includes observations "on the Plague in Egypt", "on the Overflowing of the RIver Nile, and the Qualities of its Water", "on the Climate and Seasons of the Year in Egypt", and "on the Situation of Egypt relative toi commercial Advantages", as well as "A Specimen of Turkish Justice, or, rather, of that of the Mamelucks in Egypt". John Antes was a missionary of the Moravian Church resident in Egypt from 1770 to 1781. He "produced this work in answer to those of Savary and Volney" (Blackmer). - Some foxing to title page. This copy is from the collection of the author's descendants, with several inscriptions on the flyleaf. Later in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 25. Blackmer 36. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 38. Blake 16. OCLC 4415058.
 

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19 Anville, [Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d']. L'Euphrate et le Tigre. Paris, Imprimerie Royale, 1779. 4to. 148, XII pp. With engr. folding map (535 x 448 mm) with borders in contemp. colour. Early 19th-c. brown calf; giltstamped spine rebacked.
  € 2,500
Very rare topographical work about Mesopotamia and Babylonia, written by one of the greatest cartographers and geographical writers of his age. The large-format map was also sold separately and is almost never encountered together with the book it was meant to accompany. It shows the area from Kayseri in Anatolia to Tabriz and Basra and "offre les noms anciens et modernes placés comparativemente" (Notice, no. 54). The supplement on Basra announced at the end of the books is not bound with any known copy and was probably never published; the Anville bibliography states "160 pages" (i.e., 148+12). - Covers somewhat rubbed; spine, corners and inner hinges restored in the early 20th c. A somewhat foxed, but wide-margined copy. Covers bear giltstamped arms of the "Society of Writers to the Signet", one of the oldest British legal associations (founded in 1594); their shelfmarks on pastedown; their contemporary ms. ownership note on t. p. The Burrell copy (described as "without the supplement on Basra") fetched £632 in 1999. (more)
  ¶ Notice des ouvrages de M. d'Anville (1802), no. 54 (cartes) & 36 (ouvr. impr.). Brunet I, 339. OCLC 558160044.
 

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The Ottoman state and its officials in contemporary portraits, coloured by hand
20 Arif Pacha, Muchir. Les Anciens Costumes de l'Empire Ottoman, depuis l'origine de la monarchie jusqu'a la reforme du Sultan Mahmoud. Paris, Lemercier, 1863. Folio (548 x 400 mm). Vol. I (all published). Lithographic calligraphic title, portrait of Arif Pasha, drawn on stone by M. Julien, 16 tinted lithographic plates after Arif, coloured and finished by hand. Modern cloth.
  € 35,000
First edition of this valuable and beautifully illustrated survey of the costumes worn at the court of the Ottoman Empire, published with the text in both French and Turkish. Ministers, state officials and military officers (including intelligence service) are shown in full costume with their functions captioned in Arabic and French below. Although the lithographic title states 'Tome 1er', no further volume was published in either language. - Arif Pasha fought against the Greeks at Athens and at Euboea (1826-28), and in Syria against Mehmet Ali. His career included a number of missions for the Sultan and his appointment, in 1861, as governor of the province of Silistria. - A little marginal soiling, a few closed tears, portrait lacking tip of lower corner, but overall a good, complete copy of the rare coloured issue. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 30. Blackmer 43. Lipperheide 1440m. Colas I, 148.
 

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The Ottoman state and its officials in contemporary portraits
21 Arif Pacha, Muchir. Les Anciens Costumes de l'Empire Ottoman, depuis l'origine de la monarchie jusqu'a la reforme du Sultan Mahmoud. Paris, Lemercier, 1863. Folio (548 x 400 mm). Vol. I (all published). Lithographic portrait of Arif Pasha, on India paper mounted, drawn on stone by M. Julien, 16 tinted lithographic plates after Arif. (Lacking lithographic title, toning to text). Contemp. black half morocco over black cloth-covered boards with gilt title to spine.
  € 25,000
First edition of the valuable and beautifully illustrated survey of the costume worn at the court of the Ottoman Empire, published with the text in both French and Turkish. Ministers, state officials and military officers (including intelligence service) are shown in full costume with their functions captioned in Arabic and French below. Although the lithographic title states 'Tome 1er', no further volume was published in either language. - Arif Pasha fought against the Greeks at Athens and at Euboea (1826-28), and in Syria against Mehmet Ali. His career included a number of missions for the Sultan and his appointment in 1861 as governor of the province of Silistria. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 30. Blackmer 43. Lipperheide 1440m. Colas I, 148.
 

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22 Arnù, Niccolò. Presagio dell'imminente rovina e caduta dell'imperio Ottomano. Venice, Pietro Antonio Brigonci, 1686. 4to. (8), 91, (1) pp. With several historiated woodcut initials. Modern wrappers.
  € 2,500
Second edition of this compilation of prophecies about the expected downfall of the Ottoman Empire. First published in 1684, the year after the failed Ottoman siege of Vienna. - Niccolò Arnù (1629-92) held the chair of Metaphysics at the university of Padova; among his many works is a commentary on the "Summa Theologica" of St. Thomas Aquinas (cf. Wetzer/Welte I, 1440). - Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ ICCU BVEE\045772. Not in STC.
 

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23 [Arvieux, Laurent d']. Voyage dans la Palestine, vers le Grand Emir, Chef des Princes Arabes du Desert, connus sous le nom de Bedouins, ou d'Arabes Scenites, qui se disent la vraie posterité d'Ismael fils d'Abraham [...]. Avec la description générale de l'Arabie, faite par Ismael Abulfeda, traduite en François [...] par M. [Jean] de la Roque. Amsterdam, Steenhouwer und Uytwerf, 1718. 8vo. (46), 342, (6) pp. With engr. frontispiece and 4 engr. plates (1 folding). Contemp. calf with giltstamped red label to gilt spine. Marbled pastedowns.
  € 2,000
Second edition of this travelogue, first published from the author's posthumous papers by La Roque in 1717. D'Arvieux (1635-1702) lived in the Levant for a long time, spending six years at Aleppo as French consul, and collected these important observations on the Arabic Bedouins of the area. "His observations, which departed greatly from what had been formerly reported about the Bedouins, were received with doubt, but were confirmed by later travellers such as Niebuhr" (cf. Henze I, 101). The plates show costumes and the Bedouin camp on Mt. Carmel (with a view of Haifa). - Binding rubbed and slightly bumped. Browned throughout due to paper; insignificant worming near beginning and end. Old catalogue entry mounted on front pastedown; t. p. has ms. ownership of the library of St. Lambert (dated 1749). (more)
  ¶ Weber II, 337. Gay 3452. Röhricht 1112 & 1207. Tobler 108. Hage Chahine 180. Henze I, 101.
 

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With an important map of the Peninsula
24 Avril, Adolphe, Baron d'. L'Arabie contemporaine. Avec la description du pèlerinage de la Mecque et une nouvelle carte géographique de Kiepert. Paris, E. Maillet & Challamel Ainé, 1868. 8vo. (4), 313, (3) pp. Contemp. red morocco on four raised bands, with blindstamped covers and giltstamped title to spine. Marbled endpapers.
  € 2,500
First and only edition of this rare description of the Arabian Peninsula and its inhabitants, as well as of the Muslims' annual pilgrimage to Mecca. The French diplomat Louis-Marie-Adolphe Lévesque, Baron d'Avril (1822-1904), served as Minister Plenipotentiary. Includes Heinrich Kiepert's groundbreaking map of the region (in German, folding, with slight tear near inner edge). Interior somewhat foxed throughout; altogether a good, very appealingly bound copy in excellent condition. Sold for £2,800 at Sotheby's (Oct 14, 1999, lot 61: Burrell copy). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 810. Gay 3605. Pirenne 309. pkpk
 

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25 Avril, Philippe, SJ. Travels into divers parts of Europe and Asia, undertaken by the French king's order to discover a new way by land into China [...] Together with a description of Great Tartary, and of the different people who inhabit there [...] To which is added, a supplement extracted from Hakluyt and Purchas; giving an account of several journeys over land from Russia, Persia, and the Moguls country to China. London, Tim Goodwin, 1693. 12mo. (12), 191, (1) pp. 178, (2) pp. With title-page printed in red and black. Modern half calf.
  € 2,500
First English edition of an account by the French missionary Philippe Avril, relating his travels in search of an overland route to China and the Far East. Avril embarked in 1685 in Livorno and travelled through Syria, Kurdistan, Armenia and Persia. He returned to France via Constantinople, Russia, Moldavia and Poland, arriving home in 1690. - Owner's entry on title page. Annotated in pencil. Some minor browning; tear in A2; otherwise in good condition. (more)
  ¶ De Backer/Sommervogel I, 706. Howgego I, A142 (p. 70). Cordier, Sinica, cols. 2088f. Cox I, 75f. ESTC R16481. Löwendahl 207. Lust 311. Morrison I, 311. Wing A4275.
 

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26 [Bahrein] - Cox, L[eslie] R[eginald]. Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India. Palaeontologica Indica, being figures and descriptions of the organic remains procured during the progress of the geological survey of India. Published by order of the Government of India. New Series. Vol. XXII, Memoir No. 2. Plates I to VIII. Fossil Mollusca from Southern Persia (Iran) and Bahrein Island. Calcutta & Delhi, Geological Survey of India, 1936. Large folio (268 x 365 mm). (4), II, 69, (3) pp. With 8 numbered plates.
  € 450
Scientific, well-illustrated study of fossil mollusca from the Gulf region, in particular those found in Bahrein. Inscribed by the author to the British geologist Arthur Elijah Trueman (1894-1956): "Professor A. E. Trueman, With the Author's kind regards" and with Trueman's ownership stamp. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 10180767.
 

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27 [Bakhtiyar Namah.] Knös, Gustav (ed.). [Kitab Qissat al-`asr wuzara wa-ma gara lahum ma`a ibn al-malik Azad Baht]. Historia decem vezirorum et filii regis Azad Bacht insertis undecim aliis narrationibus. Göttingen, Heinrich Dieterich, 1807. 8vo (182 x 113 mm). (2), 114, (10) pp. Contemp. green boards with giltstamped label to spine.
  € 1,500
First edition of the Arabic text. The Swedish scholar Gustaf Knös (1773-1828) studied in Göttingen and (under Silvestre de Sacy) in Paris. He held the Uppsala chair of oriental languages from 1814 until 1828. Apart from his large Syriac chrestomathy, his edition of the "Bakhtiyar Namah", or "History of the Ten Viziers" (an offshoot story of the 1001 Arabian Nights, in which the Arabic version of the tale is sometimes included), was to become his principal work. The present edition, based on a manuscript discovered in Cairo, contains the Arabic text only; a Latin translation with annotations followed (in dissertation form) in 1814. Later, following a spiritial crisis, Knös lost all interest in philology and produced no more works. - Spine somewhat sunned. An excellent, virtually unbrowned copy. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin VIII, p. 13 (note). Schnurrer 419. Brill, EI1, II, 603. Kayser III, 371. NYPL Arabia coll. 193. OCLC 186765709.
 

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First printed record of Abu Dhabi and Dubai
28 Balbi, Gasparo. Viaggio dell'Indie Orientali. Venice, Camillo Borgominieri, 1590. 8vo. (16), 159 (but: 149), (23) ff. Woodcut title device (with touches of contemp. colour), woodcut foliated initials and woodcut navigational diagram on fol. 144. Contemp. limp vellum with ms. title to spine; lacks ties. Stored in custom-made giltstamped morocco clamshell case.
  € 75,000
First edition of this travelogue by the Venetian state jeweller and merchant, containing much information useful to the contemporary merchant, including rates of exchange, duties, travel routes and distances as well as a detailed account of the pearling grounds in the Arabian Gulf. As only recent research by B. J. Slot (cf. below) has revealed, Balbi was "the first writer to record the place names between al-Qatif and Oman that are still in use today" (UAE: A New Perspective, 74). Thus, the present volume constitutes the earliest printed source for the history of the UAE, Qatar, and Oman. Balbi's "interest in the area lay in the pearls that came from the oyster beds of which the most extensive are those in the waters around al-Bahrayn, those off the Qatar peninsula and especially those in the western waters of Abu Dhabi. Either taking his information first-hand from a local individual or using a navigator’s list, Balbi recorded place-names along the coast of modern Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and the Sultanate of Oman [...] he is the first to refer to many of these places using the names by which they are known today" (G. King, cf. below). According to Slot, "practically none of the names of places on the coast between Qatar and Ras al Khaima occur in other sources before the end of the eighteenth century" (36). The present work is also of the utmost significance for "includ[ing] the first European record of the Bani Yas tribe" (UAE yearbook 2005, 46) - the first printed mention of the largest and most important tribe of the Arabian Peninsula, from which emerged both the Al Nahyan and the Al Maktoum dynasties, today's ruling families of Abu Dhabi and Dubai. - Rare: the present original edition is recorded in no more than some 20 copies worldwide (only two in the U.S., according to OCLC); most libraries hold only the Rome 1962 reprint or the mikrofiche edition (New Haven 1974). An Arabic translation was published in 2008 (OCLC 298925737); an English translation has not been prepared to this day. - An excellent copy from the library of the French librarian and theological writer (Joseph) Léon Clugnet (1848-1920) with his ownership, dated 1882 and numbered 335, on the title page. (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 3930. BM-STC Italian 68. Howgego I, B7. Cordier Japonica 112. Brunet I, 618. Graesse I, 279. Goldsmiths' 251. Kress library of economic literature S 276. Ibrahim Al Abed, Peter Hellyer. United Arab Emirates: A New Perspective. London 2001. Slot, B. J. The Arabs of the Gulf, 1602-1784. Leidschendam, published with the support of the Cultural Foundation Abu Dhabi, 1993. Geoffrey King. Delmephialmas and Sircorcor: Gasparo Balbi, Dalmâ, Julfâr and a problem of transliteration. In: Arabian archeology and epigraphy 17 (2006) 248-252. United Arab Emirates yearbook 2005 by Ibrahim Al-Abed, Paula Vine, Peter Hellyer. London 2005. Heritage Library, Qatar, p. 17. Carter, Robert A. Sea of Pearls, p. 79. Not in Adams.
 

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First printed record of Abu Dhabi and Dubai
29 Balbi, Gasparo. Aanmerklyke zee en land-reysen [...] naar Oost-Indien, van't jaar 1579 tot het jaar 1588. Leiden, Pieter van der Aa, 1706. 8vo. (2), 153, (19) pp. With Van der Aa's engraved device on title-page, 10 double-page engraved plates, and 1 folding engraved map. (Forms the final part of:) Aa, Pieter van der. Naaukeurige versameling der gedenk-waardigste Zee en Land-Reysen, na Oost en West-Indien. Ibid., 1707.
  € 2,500
First Dutch edition of Balbi's acclaimed "Viaggio dell' Indie Orientali", first published in Italian in 1590. Balbi, a Venetian jewel merchant, travelled extensively in the Arabian Peninsula in search of precious stones. From Venice he sailed for Aleppo, proceeding to Bir and from there overland to Baghdad, descending the Tigris to Basra, where he embarked for India. While in the Persian Gulf, he studied the pearl industry, noting that the best pearls were to be found at Bahrain and Julfar. He refers to islands in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi (including Sir Bani Yas and Das) and to several coastal settlements that were to become permanently established, such as Dubai and Ras al Khaima. Balbi was the first to record the place names along the coast of modern Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman. Practically "none of the names of places on the coast between Qatar and Ras al Khaima occur in other sources before the end of the eighteenth century" (Slot). - Bound with four other 16th-century travel reports, all published independently by van der Aa but re-issued as a collection in 1707. (more)
  ¶ Howgego I, B7. Klaversma & Hannema 79 (incomplete). STCN (7 copies). Cf. Cordier, Japonica, col. 112. Slot, The Arabs of the Gulf, 1602-1784 (Leidschendam, 1993), p. 36ff.
 

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First printed record of Abu Dhabi and Dubai
30 Balbi, Gasparo. Aanmerklyke zee en land-reysen [...] naar Oost-Indien, van't jaar 1579 tot het jaar 1588. Leiden, Pieter van der Aa, 1706. 8vo. (2), 153, (19) pp. With Van der Aa's engr. device on title-page and 10 double-page engr. plates (wants the folding engr. map). Modern marbled boards.
  € 1,800
First Dutch edition of Balbi's acclaimed "Viaggio dell' Indie Orientali", first published in Italian in 1590. Balbi, a Venetian jewel merchant, travelled extensively in the Arabian Peninsula in search of precious stones. From Venice he sailed for Aleppo, proceeding to Bir and from there overland to Baghdad, descending the Tigris to Basra, where he embarked for India. While in the Persian Gulf, he studied the pearl industry, noting that the best pearls were to be found at Bahrain and Julfar. He refers to islands in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi (including Sir Bani Yas and Das) and to several coastal settlements that were to become permanently established, such as Dubai and Ras al Khaima. Balbi was the first to record the place names along the coast of modern Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman. Practically "none of the names of places on the coast between Qatar and Ras al Khaima occur in other sources before the end of the eighteenth century" (Slot). - Brownstained and slightly wrinkled, with occasional edge defects. (more)
  ¶ Howgego I, B7. Klaversma & Hannema 79 (incomplete). STCN (7 copies). Cf. Cordier, Japonica, col. 112. Slot, The Arabs of the Gulf, 1602-1784 (Leidschendam, 1993), p. 36ff.
 

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31 Barros, João de. Decada primeira (-terceira) da Asia. Lisbon, Jorge Rodriguez for Antonio Gonsalvez, 1628. Large 4to. 3 vols. (6), 208 ff. (5), 231 (but: 238) ff. (10), 262 ff. Title vignettes (royal arms of Portugal). Without the folding plan present in some copies. Uniform mottled calf with double giltstamped borders and cover titles; spines elaborately gilt; double giltstamped red spine labels. All edges sprinkled in red.
  € 8,000
Second edition of the first three "Decades" on Portugal's Middle Eastern enterprises, all that was published during the lifetime of the author (a fourth volume was produced posthumously in 1615, and the set was continued by other hands). "This is considered by Du Fresnoy as being a good edition of the three first decades" (Clarke, The Progress of Maritime Discovery, p. 132). The writer de Barros (1496-1570), head agent for the Portuguese overseas trade authority "Casa da Índia", managed to persuade King João III to commission from him a history of the Portuguese in India (including Asia and southeast Africa). The result, published between 1552 and 1563, earned him renown as one of the first great Portuguese historians, and the the title of a "Portuguese Livy". The 'Decades' contain "the early history of the Portuguese in India and Asia and reveal careful study of Eastern historians and geographers, as well as of the records of his own country. They are distinguished by clearness of exposition and orderly arrangement. They are also lively accounts" (Enc. Britannica). Books 2 and 3 of the "Decada Segunda" (fols. 21 ff.) offer a detailed narrative of Afonso de Albuquerque's expedition to the Arabian Gulf and his conquest of Ormuz in 1507; the island remained under Portuese occupation from 1515 to 1622. As vassals of the Portuguese state, the Kingdom of Ormuz jointly participated in the 1521 invasion of Bahrain that ended Jabrid rule of the Arabian archipelago. - Slight waterstaining throughout; title page of vol. 1 remargined (slight loss to border rules). Old ms. ownership to title page of vol. 3; stamp on title page of vol. 1; some contemporary notes at the end of the volume. Trimmed fairly closely at times, still, a good, uniformly bound set with handsome shelf appearance. Rare; last sold at Sotheby's 1998 auction. (more)
  ¶ Palau I.181b. Howgego I, B34, p. 91. Löwendahl, Sino-Western cultural relations I, p. 42, no. 75. OCLC 4507939. Cf. Macro 472-474. pkpk
 

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32 Batanuni, Muhammad Labib. Al-Rihlah al-hijaziyah. Li-Wali al-Ni'am al-Hajj 'Abbas Hilmi basha al-thani Khidiw Misr. al-Qahirah (Cairo), Matba`at al-Jamaliyah, 1911. 8vo. 4, 54 pp., 1 bl. f., 334 pp. With 38 plates (photos, maps, plans, tables). Contemp. blindstamped red cloth (spine rebacked).
  € 400
Standard work on the Hejaz region and the Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca, by the noted Egyptian agriculturist Muhammad Labib al-Batanuni. - Binding slightly rubbed, spine rebacked. Ms. ownership note in Arabic to first page. Wants portrait of the author. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 26. OCLC 417329335. pkpk
 

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33 Ibn Batuttah. Voyages d'Ibn Batoutah. Texte arabe, accompagné d'une traduction par C. Defrémery et le Dr. B. R. Sanguinetti. Paris, Imprimerie Impériale, 1853-1859. 8vo. 4 vols. (including index). (4), XLVI, (2), 443, (1) pp. (4), XIV, (2), 465, (1) pp. (4), XXVI, (2), 476 pp. (4), 479, (5), 91, (1) pp. Contemp. red half calf with giltstamped spine labels.
  € 7,500
First and only complete edition of the Arabic text of Ibn Battuta's famous "Rihla" (literally, "The Journey"), the most significant eyewitness account of the Arabian Peninsula during the Middle Ages. Over a period of thirty years, the Muslim Moroccan explorer Abu-‘Abd Allah Muhammad ibn Batutah (1304-77?) visited most of the known Islamic world, including North Africa, the Horn of Africa, West Africa, Southern Europe and Eastern Europe in the West, to the Middle East, South Asia, Central Asia, Southeast Asia and China in the East - a distance surpassing that covered by his near-contemporary Marco Polo. Ibn Battuta is considered one of the greatest travellers of all time. He journeyed more than 75,000 miles, a figure unsurpassed by any individual explorer until the coming of the Steam Age some 450 years later. After returning home from his travels in 1354, Ibn Battuta dictated an account of his journeys to Ibn Juzayy, a scholar whom he had previously met in Granada. This account is the only source for Ibn Battuta's adventures. For centuries his book was obscure, even within the Muslim world, but in the early 19th century extracts were published in German and English based on manuscripts discovered in the Middle East, containing abridged versions of Ibn Juzayy's Arabic text. During the French occupation of Algeria in the 1830s, five manuscripts were discovered in Constantine, including two that contained more complete versions of the text. "These manuscripts were brought back to the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris and studied by the French scholars Charles Defrémery and Beniamino Sanguinetti. Beginning in 1853, they published a series of four volumes containing the Arabic text, extensive notes and a translation into French. Defrémery and Sanguinetti's printed text has now been translated into many other languages while Ibn Battuta has grown in reputation and is now a well-known figure" (Wikipedia). - Bindings rubbed and bumped; interior severely browned throughout as usual. Extremely rare. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1249. GAL II, p. 333. Henze II, 682. Cf. Carter, Robert A. Sea of Pearls, p. 63. pkpk
 

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34 Bayley, Edward Clive. The history of India as told by its own historians. The Local Muhammadan Dynasties. Gujarat. London, W. H. Allen and Co., Publishers to the India Office, 1886. Large 8vo. XX, 519, (1) pp., with 44, (4) pp. of ads. With a folding map. Original green cloth with giltstamped spine.
  € 750
First edition of the "Gujarat" volume in the series, a sequel to Sir H. M. Elliot's "History of the Muhammadan Empire of India". Partially based on a translation (by John Dowson) of the 16th-century "Mirát-i-Sikandarí" of Sikandar ibn Muhammad (Manjhu Akbar). Also includes the "Mirá-i-Ahmadí" of Ali Muhammad Khan (p. 1-23). - Binding slightly rubbed, generally in excellent condition. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 5842649.
 

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Belon's detailed account of his travels in the Levant, with a folding map of Mount Sinai
35 Belon, Pierre. Les observations de plusieurs singularitez et choses memorables, trouvées en Grece, Asie, Judée, Egypte, Arabie et autres pays estranges. Paris, (Benoist Prévost for Gilles Corrozet and) Guillaume Cavellat, 1553. 4to (215 x 165 mm). 3 parts in 1 volume. (12), 210, (2) ff. With Cavellat's woodcut device on title-page and part-titles, 36 woodcut illustrations in the text (4 hand-coloured), numerous decorated initals, and an extra added folding woodcut map (31 x 32.5 cm) showing Mount Sinai. The main text set in italic, with the preface and commentary in roman. 18th-century marbled calf, gold-tooled spine in 6 compartments, with gold-tooled title labe in the second, gold-tooled board edges.
  € 15,000
First edition of Pierre Belon's "Observations", the result of his extensive travels in Greece, Asia Minor, Egypt, Arabia and Palestine from 1546 to 1549. Belon was part of the French embassy to the Ottoman Empire, led by Gabriel de Luetz (Luez, Luels) and aimed at convincing Suleiman the Magnificent to join forces against Charles V. Divided into three parts, Belon extensively describes the natural history and the religion, customs and traditions of the peoples he encounters, with detailed observations on the pyramids, Mount Sinai, Damascus, and the consumption of opium. The fine woodcuts, attributed to Arnold Nicolai and Pierre Goudet (Gourdelle), include a hand-coloured map of the Dardanelles (Hellespont), a view of Alexandria, an illustration of a giraffe, and coins with Arabic inscriptions. The present copy is augmented with a folding map of Mount Sinai that was first published in the second edition. - Pierre Belon du Mans (c. 1518-1564) studied medicine in Paris, where he took the degree of doctor before becoming a pupil of the brilliant botanist Valerius Cordus at Wittenberg, with whom he travelled throughout Germany. Cordus died of malaria in Italy in 1544, and Belon, on his return to France, came under the patronage of François, Cardinal de Tournon. At 46 Belon was murdered in the Bois de Boulogne. - Contemporary owner's inscription on title page ("Ex libris Petri Drouotz") and several contemporary annotations (by the same?) in the margins. Title-page slightly shaved and somewhat dirty, the folding map showing slight waterstains. In very good condition. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 505. Adams B 564. Ibrahim-Hilmy, p. 61; Nissen, ZBI 304. USTC 12912. Brunet I, 762. Graesse I, 331. Cf. Atabey 93 (2nd edition); Blackmer 115 (same copy). Hage Chahine 393 (later ed.). Röhricht, Bibliotheca Palaestinae 186 (for Gil. Corrozet).
 

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36 Belon, Pierre. Les observations de plusieurs singularitez et choses memorables, trouvées en Grece, Asie, Judée, Egypte, Arabie et autres pays estranges. Paris, (Benoist Prévost for Gilles Corozet and) Guillaume Cavellat, 1555. 4to. 3 parts in 1 volume. (12), 212, (1) ff. With title in woodcut border with Cavellet's device and initials at the foot, each part-title with Cavellet's woodcut device, 1 folding woodcut map (315 x 350 mm) showing Mount Sinai, 44 woodcuts in the text (including a portrait of the author by Geoffroy Tory), and numerous fine decorated initials. Main text set in italic, with preface and commentary in roman. Overlapping vellum (ca. 1600?), sewn on 5 cords, laced through the joints.
  € 12,500
Third edition of Belon's "Observations", the fruit of his extensive travels in Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Palestine, Lebanon and Syria from 1546 to 1549. The naturalist Pierre Belon (c. 1518-64), famous for his works on ornithology, was attached to the French embassy to the Ottoman Empire, led by Gabriel de Luetz (Luez, Luels) d'Aramont, who aimed at convincing Suleiman the Magnificent to join forces against Charles V. The envoy sailed for Venice in December 1546 and proceeded to Croatia. Here Luetz continued overland to Adrianople (Edirne), while Belon sailed for Istanbul by way of Greece, visiting Lemnos, Macedonia, Crete and Kavala en route. He reached Istanbul in August 1547, explored the city and continued to Alexandria, while Luetz accompanied Suleiman to Persia. Belon's journey continued to Cairo, Mount Sinai, Jerusalem, Damascus, Baalbek, Aleppo, and again to Turkey. - Unlike many contemporary travel writers, Belon does not elaborate on extraordinary adventures, but rather limits himself to detailed observations on mammals, fish, snakes, birds, plants and the manners and customs of the peoples he encountered, commenting only on what he himself had witnessed. The fine woodcuts, attributed to Arnold Nicolai and Pierre Goudet (Gourdelle), include a map of the Dardanelles (Hellespont), a folding map of Mount Sinai, a view of Alexandria, coins with Arabic inscriptions, 3 illustrations of Egyptian costumes, a giraffe, chameleon and, surprisingly, a flying dragon and an armadillo. - The first edition was published in 1553, illustrated with 35 woodcuts only, followed by a second, augmented edition in 1554. The present edition was a joint publication of Guillaume Cavellat and Gilles Corrozet, comprising two issues with either Corrozet's or Cavallet's name in the imprint. - With printed description from a sales catalogue on pastedown, slightly browned, some light waterstains, folding plate mounted. Overall in very good condition. (more)
  ¶ Adams B 564. Aboussouan 94. Ibrahim-Hilmy 61. Gay 10. Nissen, ZBI 304. Tobler 72f. USTC 6761. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 505 (1st ed. 1553). Atabey 93 (2nd ed.). Blackmer 115 (same copy). Weber II, 153 (1st ed. 1553). Henze I, 237 (first edition). Hage Chahine 393 (later ed.). For the author: Dictionnaire des orientalistes, 75f.
 

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37 Benigni, Rudolf. Österreichische Botschaftsberichte über arabische Länder. - Austrian Embassy Reports on Arab Countries. Wien (Vienna), Österreichisches Institut für Bibliotheksforschung, Dokumentations- und Informationswesen, 1974. 8vo. 130 pp., 1 bl. f. Publisher's original printed wrapper.
  € 500
The "Austrian Embassy Reports on Arab Countries": a catalogue of and guide to all relevant documents in the Vienna State Archives formerly kept at the Imperial Internuncio and later the Embassy in Constantinople from 1750 to 1918. The documents relative to Arabia include numerous pieces on the Sherif of Mecca, the Wahhabites, the Pacha of Jeddah, Sheikh Faisal's threat to Hajj pilgrims, and British interests in the region; others relate to the Wahhabite movement in Syria, the English blockade of Mocha and various insurgencies in Yemen, as well as events in Arabic countries from Iraq and Kuweit to Algier and Morocco. "Old Austria, beyond suspicion of imperialistic designs or ambitions of colonialism, was vitally interested in preserving the Ottoman Empire and protecting both its own chartered rights and the rights of man in this enormous territory, as well as in advancing the local economic development, a process, indeed, in which the Habsburg Empire itself played an important part. The diplomatic reports reflect this situation. Striving as they did to represent the facts without any political bias, strictly according to facts, they are of especial interest to the historian. They comprise a vast area stretching from the Arabian Gulf to Morocco on the Atlantic" (introduction). - Insignificant bumping to extremeties; altogether very well preserved copy of this indispensable and rare volume of reference. (more)
  ¶ Biblos-Schriften 77. OCLC 1700363.
 

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38 Bent, J[ames] Theodore. The Bahrein Islands, in the Persian Gulf. [London, Royal Geographical Society], 1890. 8vo. 20 pp. With 3 text illustrations and a folding lithographed colour map. Modern blue wrappers with cover label.
  € 500
Offprint from the "Proceedings of The Royal Geographic Society", No. I, 1890. An early, oft-quoted study of country, history, and people of Bahrein, the "Cyprus of the Persian Gulf", with discussion of pearl fisheries, archaeological sites, commercial centres, etc. Bent's original paper, when presented before the RGS, had been accompanied by photographic slides, and Admiral Lindesay Brine had taken exception to the misleading character of some: "The Arabs were not such fearful people to look at as they appeared on the screen, some of them being very handsome men indeed" (p. 17). - Library stamps of the Upper Norwood Public Library, Croydon & Lambeth. (more)
  ¶ Sultan bin M. Al-Qasimi, The Gulf in Historic Maps 1492-1931 (1996), p. 281. Cf. Macro. Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 517.
 

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39 Bent, Theodore and Mabel. Southern Arabia. London, Smith, Elder & Co., 1900. Large 8vo. X, (2), 455, (5) pp. With photoengraved portrait frontispiece (with tissue guard), 6 (mostly folding) colour maps, and 24 plates. Original giltstamped red cloth.
  € 2,000
First edition; rare. The work, which includes a bibliography, is divided into sections on Southern Arabia, Maskat, the Hadramaut, Dhofar and the Gara Mountains, the Eastern Soudan, the Mahri Island of Sokotra, Beled Fadhli and Beled Yafei. - Bent and his wife, Mabel, made seven journeys all around the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula, including Oman and Dhofar, which from 1893 to the end of his life he made the special field for his observations and travel. He gathered an enormous amount of geographical and other information on the Hadramaut region, which they photographed extensively, but tried in vain for three successive years to penetrate the Mahri districts. In 1896 Bent traversed the island of Socotra in the Gulf of Aden and the year after made further explorations around Aden itself. This account was compiled by his wife after his death and has become one of the most sought-after of early 20th century Arabian exploration narratives. - Ex-library copy with remains of a library label on front pastedown and stamp of the "Suez Eastern Telegraph Company" on the final endpaper, slight traces of spine shelfmark label, otherwise clean. Sold for 4,600 GBP at Sotheby's 1998 Peter Hopkirk sale. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 524. pkpk
 

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40 Bérard, Victor. Le Sultan, l'Islam et les Puissances. Constantinople - la Mecque - Bagdad. Avec deux cartes hors texte. Paris, Armand Colin, 1907. Small 8vo. VI, 443, (3) pp. With 2 folding maps. Contemp. half leather with giltstamped spine title.
  € 750
Only edition. The maps show Egypt and Abessinia with the Arabian Peninsula and Asia Minor with the Middle East and Iraq. - Some foxing throughout; slight worming to lower corner of preliminary matter. Corners rubbed and bumped. Sold at Sotheby's 2002 Travel Sale for 454 GBP (later half morocco). (more)
  ¶ OCLC 252331293.
 

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41 [Bergk, Johann Adam]. Aegypten in historischer, geographischer, physikalischer, wissenschaftlicher, artistischer, naturgeschichtlicher, merkantilischer, religiöser, sittlicher und politischer Hinsicht. Berlin & Leipzig, W. Heinsius, 1799. 8vo. X, 433 (but: 431), (1) pp., final blank. With engr. title vignette, 5 engr. plates (one a frontispiece), and folding engraved map. Contemp. half calf with giltstamped spine label.
  € 950
First edition of this study of Egypt from a "historical, physical, scientific, artistic, natural-historical, economic, religious, cultural, and political perspective". The fine plates show views, monuments, costumes, and the cross-section of a pyramid. The German scholar Johann Adam Bergk (1769-1834) is remembered as a moderate Jacobin and popular philosopher. - Occasional brownstaining; old notes to pastedown. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Gay 1942. Kainbacher 40. Kayser I, 218. OCLC 257668988. Cf. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 64 (Berlin, 1798).
 

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42 [Bergk, Johann Adam]. Arabien und Syrien in historischer, geographischer, wissenschaftlicher, artistischer, naturgeschichtlicher, merkantilischer, religiöser, sittlicher und politischer Hinsicht. Berlin & Leipzig, Verlagshandlung der neuen compendiösen Bibliothek, 1799. 8vo. XVI, 512 pp. With engr. title vignette, folding engr. map, and 4 engr. plates. Contemp. marbled boards. All edges red.
  € 1,250
First edition, conceived as a continuation of Bergk's volume on Egypt. The map shows Syria; the plates depict Arabic costumes, household tools, and views of Haleb, Mecca, and Medina. The title vignette shows Mt. Sinai. Also discusses the history , topography, climate, illnesses etc. of the Arabian Peninsula (with chapters on the Nejd, Arabia Felix and Yemen, etc.) - Some browning. From the library of the Kalksburg Jesuit college with their shelfmark label on pastedown. (more)
  ¶ Kayser I, 32. Holzmann/B. I, 2892. Hamberger/Meusel XXII/1, 216. OCLC 257668994. Not in Macro, Atabey or Blackmer.
 

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43 Blunt, Wilfred Scawen. A Visit to Jebel Shammar (Nejd). New Routes through Northern and Central Arabia. [London], William Clowes & Son for Edward Stanford, 1880. 8vo. pp. 81-144. With 3 folding colour maps. In complete journal issue.
  € 1,500
Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society, No. II (Feb. 1880). Contains the account of a journey made by Blunt and his wife, Lady Anne, in the winter of 1878. The Blunts travelled in the company of Mohammed Ibn Aruk, a friend they had made in Palmyra whose family descended from a Nejd tribe. Mohammed wished to return to Nejd in order to find a wife and the Blunts seized the opportunity of accompanying him. The description of their journey is highly detailed, with details of villages they visited, careful topographical description, observations on local custom, descriptions of wildlife and an account the stud of Arab horses belonging to ibn Rashid, the reigning Emir of Hail. The account is followed by a transcript of a discussion that followed Blunt's presentation to the Royal Geographical Society. It includes observations by Sir Lewis Pelly, Mr Blanford and Sir H. Rawlinson. - The maps show Northern and Central Arabia (with the travel route taken by the Blunts) and a detailed sketch map of Jebel Shammar, as well as a sketch map of the route of the RGS East African Expedition from Dar-Es-Salaam to Lake Nyassa in 1879 (to accompany Joseph Thomson's article about that route, also here contained). - Binding repaired. A copy in modern cloth, with library stamps of the Chelsea Public library, was sold for GBP 999 at Sotheby's Travel Sale (Mediterranean & Middle East) in 2001. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 560. Boyd/P. 18.
 

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44 Bode, Baron C[lement] A[ugustus] de. Travels in Luristan and Arabistan. London, J. Madden and Co., 1845. 8vo. 2 vols. XX, 404 pp. XII, 398, (2) pp. With 15 lithographed and wood engraved plates (two folding) and 2 folding engraved maps. Recent period style brown gilt tooled half calf with marbled boards and black gilt morocco labels. A very good set.
  € 8,500
First edition. - An important account of Persia with detailed descriptions of the antiquities, archaeological sites, and the ancient history of the country. In 1841, de Bode travelled from Tehran to Isfahan, Persepolis, Shiraz, Kazeroun, Shushtar, Susa, Khorramabad and back to Tehran. "Luristan" (modern "Loristan"), or the land of the Luri people, is a western province of Persia; its main city is Khorramabad. "Arabistan" (now "Khuzestan") is located in the Eastern Persia and the main city is Ahwaz. - De Bode provides a detailed account of the ancient cities of Persepolis, the ceremonial capital of the Ahaemenid Empire, and Susa, which used to be the capital of the legendary civilisation Elam, mentioned in the Bible. In his narrative he describes numerous archaeological sites, lists the names of settlements, describes the history of the local tribes and their manners and customs. In a supplement he published his observations on the routes of Timur and Alexander the Great, who crossed south-western Persia during their conquering marches. "It is with the view of rescuing from a second oblivion this once classical ground that the Author has endeavoured to draw aside a corner of the veil which still covers this mysterious region" (preface). One of de Bode's advisors whom he acknowledges in the preface was the renowned assyriologist Sir Henry Rawlinson (1810-95), an expert in Persian and Indian vernacular languages who explored Susiana and Persian Kurdistan and was called by Budge, in "The Rise and Progress of Assyriology" (1925), "the father of Assyriology" (ODNB). - "Clement Augustus de Bode, a member of the Russian legation in Tehran, filled some empty spaces in existing maps" (Howgego). "It is mostly a travel book [...] the author gives a good picture of tribal life and especially the political situation in Fars; principally the hostility between the Qashqai tribe which controlled Shiraz. There are also descriptions of historical sites and monuments along the way" (Ghani, p. 93). (more)
  ¶ Abbey, Travel, 391. Howgego II, G2. Henze I, 281. NYPL Arabia coll. 165.
 

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With ballet illustrations by Callot
45 Bonarelli (della Rovere), Prospero. Il Solimano Tragedia. Florence, Pietro Cecconcelli, 1620. 4to. Illustrated, engraved title by Jacques Callot, (10), 162, (2) pp. With 5 folding, etched plates by Callot and woodcut printer’s device. Contemporary limp vellum. Wants ties.
  € 7,500
First edition. The magnificent engravings count among the most beautiful of Callot’s theatre and ballet illustrations. "The play [about the murder of young Mustapha by his father, the Turkish Sultan Soliman II (1596–1666)], which is dedicated to Cosimo II, Grand Duke of Tuscany, was a great success as a book; by 1636 it had gone through six editions […] The artistic significance of this work lies especially in its swift dramatic action, the well-differentiated characterisations, the skilful metre, and last but not least in its lyrical passages […]" (cf. KNLL II, 892). "Tragedia in cinque atti, una delle più importanti ed interessanti del secolo XVII, assai ricercata per la bella veste tipografica" (Libr. Vinciana). - Some foxing and browning in the blank margins; spine imperceptibly restored. (more)
  ¶ Cicognara 1086. Gamba 1536. Kat. d. Ornamentstichslg. Berlin 4112. Libreria Vinciana 3870. Slg. Schäfer, Sotheby's Cat. 8/XII/1994, lot 38 (USD 6000). Lieure 363-368. Brunet I, 1089. Graesse I, 483. Ebert 2725.
 

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A circular world map centered on the Middle East
46 [Bongars, Jacques]. [Orientalium expeditionum historia.] Gesta Dei per Francos, sive Orientalium expeditionum, et regni Francorum Hierosolimitani historia [...]. Hanau, typis Wechelianis, apud heredes Joan. Aubry, 1611. Folio (230 x 354 mm). (56), 621, (1), 625-1207, (1) pp. With 2 double-page-sized engr. folding plates and 2 engr. plans; woodcut printer's device at end. (Bound with:) Sanudo, Marino. Liber secretorum fidelium crucis super Terrae Sanctae recuperatione et conservatione [...] Orientalis historiae tomus secundus. Ibid., 1611. (12), 361 pp. (a double-page-sized folding plate numbered as 283f.). Engr. printer's device to both titles. Contemp. vellum with giltstamped spine title.
  € 15,000
Only edition of this early, important source book for the history of the crusades and the Kingdom of Jerusalem and its vassal states. The much-sought maps, usually found in the second part, are here bound after the preliminary matter of pt. 1. "Four of the maps from Marino Sanudo's early fourteenth-century manuscript atlas were reprinted by Johann Bongars in 1611. Sanudo's planisphere [...] is one of the few examples of medieval maps based on portolano sources in printed form. It is a circular map centered on Jerusalem with the Mediterranean relatively well defined. The ocean surrounds the whole of the known world, the outer parts of which are represented by conjecture. The authorship of Marino Sanudo is not definitely established and the original manuscript has also been attributed to Pietro Vesconte" (Shirley). - Slight paper defect in last text leaf but one of vol. 2, otherwise an excellent and complete copy showing only minor browning. A copy in modern half vellum (severely browned, with some worming) commanded 13,000 Euros at Reiss's spring 2009 auction. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 1:069728C & 23:231141Q. Atabey 127. Shirley 276 (and plate 217). Tooley I, 162. Laor 783, 1145f. Nordenskiöld 51 (and plate 28). Brunet I, 1098. Cioranescu (16e siècle) 4305. Rep. font. hist. med. aevi I, 105. Lex. Kart. 576 & 860f. Cf. Tobler 12.
 

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47 Boulainvilliers, Henri de. The Life of Mahomet. London, W. Hinchliffe, 1731. 8vo. (8), VIII, 400 pp. Modern half calf with giltstamped title to spine.
  € 850
First English edition. Book 1 contains a description of Arabia, as well as of Mecca and Medina; books 2 and 3 contain Mohamed's genealogy and biography. The historian Henri de Boulainvilliers (1658-1722), translator of Spinoza's "Ethics", wrote on topics so diverse as astrology, physics, philosophy and theology, though many of his writings were not printed until after his death. For his neutral reasoning, his works were cited by subsequent writers who would prove influential in the development of Western political thought and historical research. - Short tear to title page repaired; some browning and brownstaining throughout. From the library of the British philosopher of religion, David Arthur Pailin (b. 1936), with his bookplate and copious notes laid in. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin XI, p. 149, no. 477. BMC 3:1075.635. Cf. Aboussouan 153 (Amsterdam, 1731). NYPL Arabia coll. 164.
 

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48 Breton [de la Martinière, Jean-Baptiste Joseph]. L'Égypte et la Syrie, ou moeurs, usages, costumes et monumens des Égyptiens, des Arabes et des Syriens. Précédé d'un Précis historique. Paris, A. Nepveu, 1814. 12mo. 6 vols. With 84 engraved plates, mostly aquatints, in contemporary hand colour, several folding. Contemp. red grained morocco, blindstamped and giltstamped, spine gilt, leading edges and inner dentelle gilt. All edges gilt.
  € 9,500
First edition, the rare coloured issue in contemporary French master bindings. - Contains a large number of very pretty views and charming genre scenes, also showing costumes, arms, tools, etc. Accompanied by notes by Jean Joseph Marcel (1776-1854), director of the French imperial printshop at Cairo. Immaculate, sumptuously bound copy from the library of Mary Lecomte du Noüy with her gilt morocco bookplate on all pastedowns. Uncommonly well preserved; most copies in the great travel collections were incomparably the worse for wear: the Atabey copy was described as "rubbed, upper joint of vol. VI wormed" and was uncoloured, as were most of the press run and all recent copies showing up in trade or at auction. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 148. Blackmer 200. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 87. Röhricht 1631. Lipperheide Ma 10. Colas 438. Hiler 113.
 

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49 Browne, William George. Travels in Africa, Egypt, and Syria. London, T. Cadell jr., W. Davies, T. N. Longman, O. Rees, 1799. 4to. XXXVIII, 496 pp. With engr. frontispiece, engr. plan, and 2 engr. maps. Contemp. calf by McKinnell & McKie, Dumfries (spine rebacked).
  € 950
First edition. "Browne was the first European to visit Darfur, previously known merely as a name" (cf. Henze). Contains accounts of the climate, fauna and flora, customs of the natives, etc. "Browne arrived at Alexandria in 1792 and explored the antiquities at Siwah, Cairo and Kossier. He then decided to go with the great Sudanese caravan to Darfur, and his was the first European description of the area. He was detained there by the sultan but spent his time usefully in examining the country and 'solacing his ennui by the education of two young lions' (DNB). He returned with the caravan in 1796 having obtained remarkably accurate information on the course of the Nile and arrived in England in 1798 by way of Syria, Asia Minor and Constantinople. He later travelled in Turkey and the Levant generally, meeting an untimely end at the hands of Persian bandits in 1813" (Blackmer). - Binding professionally restored. Some browning throughout. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. The copy from the library of Ernst August II of Hanover commanded £2,200 at Sotheby's Blackmer sale in 1989. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 219. Howgego I, B170. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 91. Gay 43. Henze I, 349. Graesse I, 549.
 

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50 Brun, C. De redding der bemanning van het Nederlandsch brikschip Nijverheid, verbrant in de Indische zee benevens de beschrijving eener reis op de kust en in de binnenlanden van Oost-Afrika. Rotterdam, Mensing van Westreenen, 1818. 8vo. XXIII, (1), 389, (1) pp. With woodcut vignette on title-page. Original printed boards.
  € 1,800
First edition. - Detailed report of the homeward journey of the crew of the Dutch ship "Nijverheid", wrecked in the Indian Ocean. In addition to the account of the loss of the ship and the rescue of the crew, Brun provides a comprehensive description of the states of Oman, Mosambique and Madagaskar. The account of Mascate includes comments on the great abilities of the Arabian seamen in operating nautical instruments, as well as on the beauty of Arabian women. Two tribes are mentioned specifically: the Harthy clan ruled by Sheikh Abdalla Ben Djemo, Governor of Zanzibar, and another under the rule of Emir Saleh. In the ensuing short history from the sixteenth century onwards, the Al Qasimi play a prominent role. - Contemporary ownership "B. Poortman, Rotterdam" on title page. Occasional slight browning, but altogether very well preserved. Rare. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 63869111.
 

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16th century Life of the Prophet, illustrated
51 Bry, Johann Theodor & Johann Israel de. I. Acta Mechmeti I. Saracenorum principis. Außführlicher Bericht, von Ankunfft, Zunehmen, Gesatzen, Regirung und jäm[m]erlichem Absterben Mechmeti I. Genealogia seiner Successorn, biß auff den jetztregirenden Mechmetem III. Auß vielen glaubwürdigen Autoribus fleissig zusammen getragen. II. Propheceyung. Keysers Severi un[d] Leonis, sampt etlichen andern Weissagungen, vom Undergang deß Türckischen Regiments bey jetztregirenden Mechmete III. [Frankfurt/Main], Gebr. Hans Dietrich & Hans Israel de Bry, 1597. 4to. (8), 101, (3) pp. With engr. title border and 26 engravings in the text. Marbled boards (c. 1900).
  € 12,500
Very rare first German edition; published simultaneously in Latin. "The first part of this work deals with Mohammed the Prophet, the ten illustrations depicting scenes from his life. It was reprinted, complete with the engravings, in 1664 by Wilhelm Serlin in his Chronica Turcica. The second part, containing sixteen allegorical engravings, records a prophecy of the downfall of the Turkish Empire" (Blackmer Sale). - Slightly browned and brownstained throughout; several edge defects remargined (slight loss to text at lower edge of ff. B4 and M1), but complete (the incomplete copy sold at the Atabey Sale in 2002 commanded £9,560). (more)
  ¶ VD 16, ZV 2613. IA 126.170. Blackmer 484. Blackmer Sale 92. Göllner 2287. Hiler 5. Lipperheide Lb 11. Cf. Adams B 2978. Atabey 331. Atabey Sale 333. Cicognara 1863. Praz² 291 & 401f. BM-STC German 634. Not in Brunet, Caillet, Colas, Dorbon-Ainé, Ebert, Graesse, Landwehr. pkpk
 

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52 Brydges, Harford Jones. An account of the transactions of His Majesty's Mission to the Court of Persia, in the Years 1807-11 [...] To which is appended, a brief history of the Wahauby. London, James Bohn, 1834. 8vo. 2 vols. VIII, 472, XXXIV. (4), V, (6)-238 pp. With 2 lithogr. frontispieces, 9 lithogr. plates on Chine appliqué and 1 folding lithogr. map of Central Arabia and Egypt. Contemp. tan calf bindings, spines renewed in period style.
  € 18,000
First edition. The second volume - and the map - are devoted entirely to the so-called "Nedjed Country". - "The first political and commercial treaty between Great Britain and Persia was concluded in 1801, when the East India Company sent John Malcolm to the Court of Fath Ali Shah. Persia undertook to attack the Afghans if they were to move against India, while the British undertook to come to the defence of Persia if they were attacked by either the Afghans or the French. When the Russians intensified their attacks on the Caucasian Provinces in 1803 annexing large territories, Fath Ali Shah appealed to the British for help, but was refused on the grounds that Russia was not included in the Treaty. The Persians thus turned to the French and concluded the Treaty of Finkenstein in 1807. It was against this background that Harford Jones, who was the chief resident at Basra for the East India Company, was sent to Persia by the Foreign Office in 1809 [...] The French who had now entered into a treaty with Russia (the Treaty of Tilsit in 1807) had lost interest in Persia and removed their political and military missions. Thus the British were able to conclude another treaty with Persia (the Treaty of Friendship and Alliance, also called the Treaty of Tehran) which bound Britain to assist Persia in case any European nation invaded her (even if Britain had a treaty with that nation). This treaty was not honoured by the British after the first Persian-Russian War" (Ghani). Volume 2 is devoted exclusively to the Wahhabis, tracing their history from the mid-eighteenth century to their defeat by Egyptian Ottoman forces at the site of the Wahhabi capital, Dariyah (Dereyah), in 1818. - Rare: the only other copy in a contemporary binding on the market within the last 30 years was the Burrell copy (wanting half titles and rebacked; Sotheby's, Oct 14, 1999, lot 127, £8,000). Only slightly browned and foxed (occasionally affecting plates), but altogether fresh, in an appealing full calf binding. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 606. BM IV:457 (941). Wilson 33. Cf. Ghani 53f. (reprint). Diba 79.

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53 [Buraimi Dispute]. Buraimi, a Saudi Arabian Emirate. Baghdad, 1953 CE - 1373 AH. 80 pp. With three printed portrait frontispieces and a full-page map of the Arabian Gulf, all in the pagination. Original printed wrappers, stapled. 8vo.
  € 2,800
Only edition of this intriguing and early publication on the so-called Buraimi dispute that involved Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi and Oman. The Buraimi Oasis had been claimed by the powerful Sultan of Muscat as early as 1819, while two no less powerful personages in the north of the Peninsula, the Sheiks of Abu Dhabi and of Sharjah, both asserted their own suzerainty, and from 1869 on, the Sultan of Muscat and Sheikh Zayed bin Khalifa Al Nahyan of Abu Dhabi jointly ruled the Oasis. While the Saudis did not claim Buraimi during the border negotiations of 1935 and Zayed Al Nahyan emerged as governor of the region, the dispute flared up once more in the 1950s when the Sultanate of Muscat and Oman quarrelled with the newly-established Kingdom of Saudi-Arabia over the possession of Buraimi. Ultimately, the Sultan managed to fend off such claims with the support of the British government. The present publication, printed in the Kingdom of Iraq at a point when the dispute was steering toward a climax, recounts the history of the conflict, assuming a pro-Saudi (and thus, anti-British) stance; tellingly, it includes portraits of HRH Abd al-Aziz ibn Saud and his sons, HRH Saud ibn Abd al-Aziz and HRH Faisal ibn Abd al-Aziz. - Evenly browned throughout; minor edge chipping and slight discolouration from staples. Extremely rare. (more)
 

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54 Burchard, Wilhelm. Wilhelm Burchards eines in die 19 Jahr von Türcken gefangen gewesenen Sachsen auffs neu eröffnete Türckey [...]. Mit vielen Figuren zum andern mahl herraus gegeben. Magdeburg, Johann Daniel Müller, 1691. 4to. 31 ff. With large folding woodcut plate, 3 double-page-sized folding woodcut plates, and 21 woodcuts in the text (some full-page). Later boards.
  € 18,000
Second edition of this very rare description of the Ottoman empire, its state organization, institutions, religion, customs, estates, the city of Constantinople, etc. Includes a list of Ottoman rulers at the end. The author reports from his own experience "how the Turk treats captured Christians". The large folding plate (19 x 116 cm) shows a magnificent procession to the sacrificial ceremony; the smaller ones depict the layout of a settlement, pyramids as burial sites, as well as parts of Constantinople. The text woodcuts show the Prophet Muhammad, the city of Mecca, Turkish priests, teachers, pilgrims, dignitaries, warriors, horsemen, and various types of buildings. The illustration of Emperor Justinian is probably modelled after a 16th century image. - The 1688 first edition was published with an engraved frontispiece but otherwise agrees entirely with the present second one, which is basically a re-issue of the first with only the title page exchanged. As always, the first gathering contains only three leaves: a blank fourth leaf was probably removed by the publisher (rendering erroneous the collation provided by VD 17, citing 32 ff). - Title trimmed; four lines clipped; mounted on backing paper. Final leaf remargined (slight loss to text); some browning and brownstaining throughout. Only two copies in America (Yale, Harvard). From the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. - No copy recorded at auction within the last decades. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 23:647842Y. OCLC 257781269.
 

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55 Burckhardt, Johann Ludwig (John Lewis). Travels in Arabia, comprehending an account of those territories in Hedjaz which the Mohammedans regard as sacred. London, Henry Colburn, 1829. Large 4to (26 x 21 cm). XVI, 478 pp. With five lithogr. maps (one folding). 19th century three-quarters green levant with prettily gilt spine. Marbled endpapers. All edges gilt.
  € 6,500
First edition (the second of the same year was in two volumes, octavo). Burckhardt travelled disguised as an Arab, making his notes clandestinely. This work deals primarily with his travels to Mecca and Djidda, Medina and Yembo. The Lausanne-born Burckhardt (1784-1817) was a remarkable character, the first Westerner to visit the Holy Cities. In the guise of a pilgrim "he proceeded to perform the rites of pilgrimage at Mekka, go round the Kaaba, sacrifice, &c., and in every respect acquitted himself as a good Muslim. No Christian or European had ever accomplished this feat before; and the penalty of discovery would probably have been death. [...] Burckhardt possessed the highest qualifications of a traveller. Daring and yet prudent, a close and accurate observer, with an intimate knowledge of the people among whom he travelled, their manners and their language, he was able to accomplish feats of exploration which to others would have been impossible" (Stanley Lane-Poole, in: DNB VII, 293f.). - Old stamp of the "Belcher Library" (Gaysville, Vermont) on first blank, some toning and brownstaining. Rare. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 627. Howgego II, B76. Weber I, 168. Gay 3606. Graesse I, 575. Cf. Blackmer 239. Henze I, 407. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 106 (2nd ed. only). Not in Atabey.
 

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The fullest account of Wahhabism
56 Burckhardt, Johann Ludwig (John Lewis). Notes on the Bedouins and Wahabys, collected during his travels in the East. London, (A. J. Valpy for) Henry Colburn & Richard Bentley, 1831. 8vo. 2 vols. IX, (3), 382 pp. IV, 391, (1) pp. With a folding engr. map. Modern brown half calf with giltstamped spine.
  € 4,500
First edition, second printing. With this work, Burckhardt submitted what was at the time the fullest and most thorough account of the various nomadic tribes of Arabia, including a history of the Wahhabites from their first appearance until 1816 (cf. Henze). A German translation appeared that same year. - The Swiss explorer Burckhardt (1784-1817) travelled through Syria, Jordan, Egypt, Nubia, and the Arabian Peninsula. Under the name "Sheikh Ibrahim", he crossed the Red Sea to Jeddah, passed an examination on Muslim law, and participated in the pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina. He died in Cairo and is buried there in the Muslim cemetery. He left his 350-volume library to Cambridge University; his diaries were acquired by the Royal Geographical Society. - Some brownstaining throughout. From the Friends Free Library in Germantown, Pennsylvania (their red library stamp, c. 1880); later in the collection of the British scholar Lawrence I. Conrad (b. 1949), historian of Near Eastern Medicine at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine in London (his ms. ownership on front pastedown and bookplate to t.p.). Conrad is the author of numerous studies on medieval Near Eastern social history, Arabic and Islamic medicine, and Arabic, Greek, and Syriac historiography. (more)
  ¶ Embacher 57. Henze I, 406f. Hiler 127. OCLC 4637295. Cf. Macro, Bibl. of the Arabian Peninsula 626. Howgego II, B76 (first print). Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 106. Henze I, 407. Engelmann 104. Brunet I, 1401 (1st print). Graesse I, 575 (1st print).
 

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57 Burigny, Jean Levesque de. Histoire des révolutions de l'Empire de Constantinople, depuis la fondation de cette ville, jusqu'à l'an 1453 que les Turcs s'en rendirent maîtres. Paris, de Bure, 1749. 8vo. 3 vols. XXXVI, 391, (1) pp. XVII, 579, (1) pp. VII, 559, 13 pp. Contemp. calf with double label to gilt spine; leading edges gilt. Marbled endpapers. All edges red.
  € 6,500
First edition of this history of the Byzantine Empire up to the fall of Constantinople and the beginning of the Ottoman reign. - Exceptionally beautiful set from the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Cf. Blackmer 243. Atabey 168 (both dated "1750").
 

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Inscribed copy
58 Burton, Richard Francis. Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to El-Medinah and Meccah. London, Longman, 1855-1856. 8vo. 3 vols. With 14 plates (5 chromolithographed), one folding engraved map, and 3 plans (2 folding). Green half morocco gilt by H. Sotheran.
  € 45,000
First edition. Author's presentation copy with his autograph inscription to his friend and benefactor James Grant Lumsden in two volumes. - Burton, the first English Christian to enter Mecca (performing the Haj, disguised as a Muslim), was also the first to travel between the Holy Cities of Islam by way of the Eastern route. Alongside Doughty's "Arabia Deserta", the "Pilgrimage" is considered by Penzer one of the "greatest works of travel ever published". Having completed the pilgrimage, Burton, rather than returning to England, sailed for India to join his regiment in Bombay. "He stayed at the house of James Grant Lumsden, a senior member of the Bombay Council, and there wrote the three-volume Pilgrimage" (Howgego). Inscribed: "J. Grant Lumsden DD, R.F. Burton, August 1855" on title page of vols. 1-2. "The son of an Army officer, Lumsden was educated at Haileybury, and went out to India as a writer in 1826. During the ensuing years, his obvious abilities brought him promotion to a number of important posts as Political Agent, Collector, Magistrate, and Judge. In 1848 he was appointed Secretary to Government in the Judicial, General, and Persian Department. He and Burton may well have become personally acquainted the previous year, when Burton sat his Persian examination in Bombay. On 28 November 1853 Lumsden was appointed Provisional Member of Council, becoming a full member the following February" (Godsall). Inscribed copies of Burton's "Personal Narrative" are rare. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 640. Howgego III, B96. Godsall, The Tangled Web: A Life of Sir Richard Burton, 112. Penzer 49f. Casada 53. Spink 7. Cf. Gay 3634 (in -12). Henze I, 429. Auboyneau 59 (2nd ed. 1857).
 

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59 Busbecq, Ogier Ghislain de. Legationis Turcicae Epistolae quatuor, quarum priores duae ante aliquot annos in lucem prodierunt sub nomine Itinerum Constantinopolitani et Amasiani. Paris, Apud Aegidium Beys, 1589. 186 ff. Contemporary boards. 8vo.
  € 5,000
First publication of these four Turkish letters. Busbecq, a Fleming, was Emperor Ferdinand's ambassador at the Porte from 1555 to 1562. "The first collected edition of all four letters appeared at Paris in 1589. The first letter was printed at Antwerp in 1581, and the second in 1582" (Atabey). Busbecq's letters contain observations of Turkish life and analyses of the Ottoman state. - Insignificant browning; a few old underlinings. Title and endpapers have dated ownerships. Of the utmost rarity, no copy at auction internationally (only the second edition). (more)
  ¶ Adams B 3331. Graesse I, 580. OCLC 457194296. Cf. Blackmer 249. Göllner II, 2026 (both the 1595 Frankfurt second edition).
 

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60 Cadi, Chérif. Terre d'Islam. Oran, Heintz frères for Charles-Lavauzelle in Paris/Limoges/Nancy, 1925. 8vo. 164, (2) pp. With 3 colour maps (1 folding) and 6 plates. Contemp. red half calf with marbled covers and giltstamped spine title.
  € 850
Extremely rare French study of Islamic culture, society, religion, and the Islamic countries, with chapters on the Pilgrimage to Mecca, the Holy City of Mecca, Rabigh, Bir Derouich, bedouins, polygamy, the Arabic language, astronomy, legislative reforms, and geography. Binding slightly rubbed at extremities, otherwise perfectly preserved. Removed from the "Bibliothèque de Garnison, Place de Montpellier" with their library and accession stamps (1927) and shelfmarks. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 223135524.
 

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61 Callenberg, Johann Heinrich (praes.) / Vockerodt, Ludwig Christian (resp.). Iuris circa Christianos Muhammedici particulae. E codicibus Moslemorum [...]. Halle, Christian Henckel, (1729). 4to. (4), 18, (2) pp. Papered spine.
  € 1,500
Considered Callenberg's probably most scholarly work, a Halle disputation about Muslim laws respecting Christians. The respondent was Ludwig Christian Vockerodt, the son of Callenberg's former teacher in Gotha, Gottfried Vockerodt. With numerous notes in Arabic. The German orientalist and Lutheran professor of theology and philology Johann Heinrich Callenberg (1694-1760) tried to promote conversions among Jews and Muslims. For this purpose he founded (in 1728) the "Institutum Judaicum et Muhammedicum", which also produced oriental-language translations of Christian tracts. - Well preserved. (more)
  ¶ GAL S I, 347.
 

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62 Camoens, Luis de. The Lusiad, or Portugals Historicall Poem; Written in the Portingall Language by Luis de Camoens, and now newly put into English by Richard Fanshaw, Esq. London, printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1655. Folio. (22), 224 pp., plus full-page engraved portraits of Prince Henry the Navigator and Vasco de Gama. Engraved portrait frontispiece of Camoens with verses below. 20th-century red morocco, gilt with all edges gilt and gilt inner dentelles by Bayntun.
  € 28,000
The first English-language edition of the epic poem of Portuguese exploration, a monument of Portuguese literature, and a work that gave a Homeric form to Renaissance-era travels and discoveries. "The 'Lusiads', as a synthesis of national sentiment and literary development, stands unchallenged as the epic of the Portuguese nation, and it celebrates more than anything else the voyage of Da Gama and the intrepid bravery of the Portuguese on land and sea" (Lach). Camoens' work was first published in Lisbon in 1572. In the early 1530s the great Portuguese historian, Joao de Barros, most famous for his "Decadas de Asia", called for an epic poem of Portuguese exploration and discovery. That call was answered later in the century by Luis de Camoens (1524-80). Camoens was educated in a monastic school in Coimbra, and produced poetry and plays at a young age. In his early twenties he was banished from Lisbon after producing a play thought to be disparaging of the royal family. He served as a soldier in the Portuguese forces besieging Ceuta in North Africa, where he lost an eye. Camoens returned to Lisbon in 1550, but found himself in more trouble, and was pardoned by the King on condition that he serve the Crown in India for five years. He arrived at Goa in late 1553 and stayed there briefly before joining an expedition to the Malabar Coast. Later he participated in a campaign against pirates on the shores of Arabia. In 1556 he left Goa again for the East Indies, taking part in the military occupation of Macao, where he remained for many months. On his return trip to India, Camoens was shipwrecked off the Mekong and wandered in Cambodia before getting to Malacca and eventually back to Goa. He did not return to Lisbon until 1570. Camoens' inspiration for his epic poem, composed in ten Cantos, was Virgil's 'Aeneid'. Camoens made explorer Vasco de Gama his hero, using his exploits as a way to glorify the achievements of the Portuguese nation, the "sons of Lusus" (the mythical first settler of Portugal). Camoens likely wrote parts of Cantos III and IV, which deal with Portuguese history, before his departure for the East, but Lach and others make a convincing case that the bulk of the poem could only have been written after Camoens had his long firsthand experience in India and Asia. Indeed, Camoens wrote much of the work while in the East. Cantos VII to X deal most directly with Asia, beginning with Da Gama's arrival in India and ending with his return to Portugal. Canto X also includes references to Mexico and Brazil. "The Lusiad" is a fine description not only of Portuguese exploits in the East, but also of the flora and fauna of Asia and India, the ethnographic details of the peoples there, and of the geography of the region, informed by Camoens' own experiences as well as familiarity with Ptolemy and Barros. The "Lusiad" was immensely popular upon its publication in 1579, appearing in several Portuguese and Spanish editions, and serving as a source for Linschoten in the preparation of his "Itinerario" in 1595. Camoens' epic poem not only sang the praises of the Portuguese nation, it also appealed to Christian Europe in calling for a common crusade against Turkish and Muslim Asia. "The 'Lusiads' is indeed the national poem par excellence and the supreme epic of Portugal's conquests in the East [...] In its stately grandeur, the 'Lusiads' is to Portuguese poetry what Barros' 'Decades' are to Portuguese prose. Their national literature never again reached such heights, nor has the literature of any other country writings to surpass these two masterpieces in their special fields" (Penrose). "The 'Lusiads' is a synthesis of all the elements included in the reality and myth of Portugal's overseas expansion. It captures the heroism and the suffering, the glory and the disillusionment, the generosity and the avarice which characterized the national enterprise. The author himself was the only major Portuguese poet to participate personally in the voyage, the wars, and the rigors of life in Asia. His epic successfully combines the personal with the national experience and provides thereby an intelligible, individualistic expression of the collective enterprise in which Portuguese of all walks of life had engaged either directly or indirectly" (Lach). - Minor toning and soiling to text, but generally quite clean. A most important work of epic poetry and of the literature of overseas expansion and the exploration of Asia. (more)
  ¶ Howgego I, C27. Penrose, Travel and Discovery in the Renaissance, p.72- 73, 289-90. Lach, Asia in the Making of Europe II.2, p.149-60. European Americana 655/30. Streeter Sale 41. Wither to Prior 349. Pforzheimer 362. Wing C-397. Graesse II, 27.
 

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63 Cantemir, Dimitrie. Geschichte des osmanischen Reichs nach seinem Anwachse und Abnehmen. Aus dem Englischen übersetzt. Hamburg, (Piscator f.) Herold, 1745. 4to. 64, 852, (2) pp. With title vignette, 3 headpieces, 2 tailpieces, 5 initials, folding plan, and 23 portraits (all engraved). Contemp. calf with giltstamped ownership "N. H. v. Engelhard" to upper cover.
  € 6,500
"First edition in German" (Atabey), translated by J. L. Schmidt. The principal work of Dimitrie Cantemir, Prince of Moldavia (1673-1723), author of numerous learned historical works. With the author's portrait, portraits of the Turkish rulers, and a layout plan of the city of Constantinople. - Endpapers stamped "Andre S." and with ms. ownership "H. W. Lado" (both 18th-century ownerships); deleted stamp to title page; occasional edge repairs. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 192. Graesse II, 38. Ebert 3465. OCLC 630479705.
 

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64 [Carey, Mathew]. A Short Account of Algiers, and of its Several Wars Against Spain, France, England, Holland, Venice, and Other Powers of Europe [...]. Second Edition, Improved. Philadelphia, Mathew Carey, 1794. 8vo. 50, (2) pp. With a folding engr. map of the Barbary Coast. Marbled wrappers.
  € 950
A classic specimen of the American "Barbary captivity narrative". "During the early national period, hundreds of Americans were held captive in the north African states of Morocco, Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli. Most were captured off American ships that had been seized by Barbary corsairs in the Mediterranean, and most - but not all - were ransomed back to the United States after a captivity that lasted anywhere from a few months to more than a decade" (Daniel Williams, in: Early American Literature Vol. 36/2 [2001], p. 314). Offers "a concise view of the origin of the rupture between Algiers and the United States. To which is added, a copious appendix, containing letters from Captains Penrose, M'Shane, and sundry other American captives, with a description of the treatment those prisoners' experience" (subtitle). The Irish-born publisher Mathew Carey (1760-1839), a protegé of Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and the Marquis de Lafayette, had emigrated to the U.S. in 1784. While his publishing business struggled, he wrote on various social topics and provided political commentary, reporting on debates in the state legislature. Carey printed the first American version of the Douay-Rheims Bible, popularly known as the "Carey Bible", the first Catholic version of the Bible printed in the U.S. - Browned throughout. Rare. (more)
  ¶ Evans 26733. OCLC 3496109. Not in Gay.
 

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65 Carne, John. Syria, the Holy Land, Asia Minor, &c. illustrated. London u. a., Fisher, 1836-1838. 4to. 3 vols. With 3 engr. title pages, 2 engr. maps, and 113 (instead of 117) plates. (4), 80 pp. 76 pp. 100, (4) pp. Contemp. cloth.
  € 850
First edition. The attractive views of Alexandria, Antioch, Beirut, Damascus, Jaffa, Jerusalem, Rhodes, Tripoli etc. are engraved from drawings by W. H. Bartlett, W. Purser and others. - Slightly rubbed and bumped, spine faded and with small tears. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 291. Aboussouan 187. Weber I, 1125. Cf. Howgego II, E4 (p. 194). Tobler 167.
 

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One of the most valuable Middle Eastern travel accounts of the period
66 Cartwright, John. The preachers travels. Wherein is set downe a true iournall to the confines of the East Indies, through the great countreyes of Syria, Mesopotamia, Armenia, Media, Hircania and Parthia. With the Authors returne by the way of Persia Susiana, Assiria, Chaldaea, and Arabia [...]. Also a true relation of Sir Anthonie Sherleys Entertainmend there [...]. London, printed for Thomas Thorpe, 1611. 8vo. (6),107, (1) pp. 19th-century three-quarter calf over marbled boards, gilt label. All edges red.
  € 45,000
An account by John Cartwright of his travels in the Middle East in the early 17th century. An English preacher (also identified on the title page as a "sometimes student in Magdalen College in Oxford"), the author accompanied John Mildenhall, the English merchant and traveller, on his journey from Aleppo to Kashan in Persia. "After separating from Mildenhall, Cartwright proceeded to Esfahan and continued to travel widely in the Middle East. The account of his journeys is one of the most valuable of the period" (Howgego). In addition to describing the numerous places on his various itineraries, Cartwright also writes of the routes in use, products of note, and the potentials for commerce. The text also includes a brief account of the experiences of Anthony Sherley, an English adventurer whose own account of Persia was not published until 1613. A very rare book, one of the earliest English narratives of travel in the Near East. - Title page slightly soiled. Bottom edge closely trimmed throughout, affecting numerous catchwords and signature marks. Light age-toning throughout. A few contemporary ink marks on pages 64 and 65. A very good copy with the 1860 engraved bookplate of the library of the Earls of Macclesfield on front pastedown. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 686. Howgego I, C58. Bell C95. OCLC 37749438, 4687781.
 

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67 Cassas, Louis François. Voyage pittoresque de la Syrie, de la Phoenicie, de la Palestine, et de la Basse Egypte. [Paris, 1799]. Imperial folio (540 x 360 mm). 7 parts of text and 3 vols. with 30 parts of plates bound in one. 7, 8, 8, 15, 12, 20, 8 pp. With 177 engr. plates, of which 28 are either double-page-sized or folded. Later half leather with gilt title to spine, marbled boards and endpapers.
  € 28,000
First edition; a wide-margined, spotless copy on superior paper, complete with all the text matter published. This monumental pictorial account of Cassas's travels in the Middle East was commissioned by the French ambassador to the Ottoman court. Cassas travelled in Egypt, Asia Minor, Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, and Cyprus, sketching many sites which had never been recorded in print before. He also drew scenes from daily life, including a desert caravan, a wedding, and street scenes. The work was intended to comprise 330 plates with accompanying text, but only 30 parts were issued, without a title page, and with text to accompany the first seven parts only. The present set includes the bifolium of text which accompanied the first delivery of plates. Copies vary in the number of plates: Atabey considers "around 180" the standard, but most copies coming up for auction during the last decades (last Christie's, 3 June 2009, lot 119: £22,500 with the first two pages of text only) contained considerably fewer than that and nearly all of them lacked most of the accompanying text, all of which is present here. - A fine copy preserved in a charming late 19th-century binding, to which the talented binder also added a hand-drawn title page, as none was ever printed for this monumental work. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 201. Blackmer 295. Brunet I, 1616. Cohen/R. 204-5 (173 plates). Monglond IV, 993-1005 (180 plates). pkpk
 

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68 Castellan, A. L. Moeurs, usages, costumes des Othomans, et abrégé de leur histoire. Paris, Nepveu, 1812. 12mo. 6 vols. With 6 engraved frontispieces and 66 engraved plates, all in original hand colour. Contemp. calf gilt; all edges gilt.
  € 15,000
First edition. "Plates are by Dalvimart, most of them reduced from those in William Alexander’s ‘Costume of Turkey’" (Hiler). The pretty plates (some aquatints) depict not only various costumes and head coverings, but also dramatic scenes. - Well-preserved, appealingly bound copy with engraved bookplate of Baron de La Roche Lacarelle to pastedowns. Removed from the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 300. Aboussouan 189. Hage Chahine 821. Lipperheide Lb 42. Colas 545. Hiler 143. Auboyneau 370. Brunet I, 1226. Graesse I, 530.
 

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69 Castelli, Pietro. Opobalsamu[m] Triumphans. Basel, Franz Perna, 1640. 4to. Engraved t. p., (6), 51 (1) pp. Written space rules throughout. Marbled boards.
  € 3,500
Early botanical study of the Balsam of Mecca (Balm of Gilead), a resinous gum of the tree Commiphora opobalsamum, native to southern Arabia. The resin was valued for use in medicine and perfume in ancient Greece and the Roman Empire; thus Pliny the Elder mentions it as one of the ingredients of the "Royal Perfume" of the Parthians in his "Naturalis Historia". - One of several editions published the same year; Perna himself produced another version without his imprint on the title page. "Concerns controversy with Antonio Manfredi and Vincenzio Panulio" (Krivatsy). - Born and educated at Rome, the surgeon and botanist Pietro Castelli (1574-1662) moved to Messina in 1634. Here, he laid out the botanical gardens, where he cultivated many exotic medicinal plants. - Heavy brownstaining throughout, still a good copy of this rare work. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 1:062780A. Cf. Krivatsy 2252.
 

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70 Castro, Dom João de & de Carvalho, Antonio Nunes. [Logbook of the Red Sea and Arabian Coast. With Atlas Volume]. Roteiro em que se contem a Viagem que fizeram os Portuguezes no Anno de 1541, partindo da nobre Cidade de Goa atee Soez, que he no fim, e Stremidade do Mar Roxo. Com o sitio, e pintura de todo o Syno Arabico [...] tirado a luz pela primeira vez do manuscrito original, e acrescentado com o Itinerarium Maris Rubri [...]. Paris, Baudry & Barrois, 1833. 8vo. (6), LIV, IX, 334, (2) pp. With engr. frontispiece portrait of Castro, engr. portrait of Estevão da Gama, and folding map of the Arabian coast (51 x 39.5 cm) with closed tear at right. With folio atlas volume (30.5 x 42.5 cm): (32) composed of 16 (mostly) hand-coloured maps and views. Text bound in contemp. quarter calf on marbled boards with gilt titles to spine (joints rubbed), album in contemp. marbled boards with green calf spine (worn).
  € 7,500
Very scarce (unrecorded on ABPC) account of this 16th-century sea voyage around the Arabian Peninsula, including the rare folio atlas of plates. The present work is the first full appearance of this journal in print, published from the original manuscript logbooks of Castro's journey. The present copy is illustrated with 16 beautiful large-size folding maps and views of the coast (each c. 57 x 42 cm, hand-coloured and including vignettes and miniature views of cities and inhabitants). Table XV shows the port of "Toro" - thought to be the ancient city of Aelana, near modern-day Aqaba, including a depiction of a small village with Turkish soldiers attacking Christians - most likely the earliest image ever composed of this region of the Arabian coast. Castro's voyage took him up the Red Sea. He alighted on both the African and the Arabian coast until he reached Suez; his account includes imaginative depictions of the various ports he encountered en route. His manuscript touches on both navigational matters and events of general interest: for example, he devotes a long passage to refuting the theory that the Red Sea really is red (p. 257) by drawing up daily samples for examination. As the British Library catalogue notes, the original manuscript was reputed to have been bought by Sir Walter Raleigh for £60. - From the library of Portuguese statesman Antonio Capucho with his engraved bookplate to pastedown. (more)
  ¶ Welsh 4780. Catalogue of the manuscript maps, charts and plans [...] in the British Museum, p. 386. Scholberg, Bibliography of Goa & the Portuguese in India, DC7. Avila Perez 1562 ("rara"). pkpk
 

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71 Centorio degli Hortensi, Ascanio. Commentarii della guerra di Transilvania. (With:) La seconda parte de' commentarii delle guerre. Venice, Gabriel Giolito de' Ferrari, 1566-1569. 4to. 2 vols. in 1. (40), 266, (2) pp. (32), 298, (2) pp. With woodcut printer's devices on both titles, and different device on reverse of final leaf. Contemp. limp vellum.
  € 3,500
First edition (part 1: second issue) of Centorio's memoirs, here complete with both parts, comprising the years until 1553 (pt. 1) and then continued to 1560 (pt. 2). The author's principal work. Centorio lived in Milan around the middle of the 16th century. "Commentaries on the wars against the Turks from Mohács in 1526 onwards. Offers a detailed account of the conflict between Ferdinand and John Zápolya, as well as of the battles of Castaldo. Although the title of pt. 1 mentions 'Re Lodovico XII', this is about Louis II of Hungary, who drowned after the Battle of Mohács, not about Louis XII of France" (cf. Göllner). Dedications to Ottavio Farnese, duke of Parma and Piacenza, and Consalvo Ferrante di Cordova, duke of Sessa. Includes four sonnets by the author and Lodovico Dolce. "Fine woodcut initials and headpieces" (cf. Apponyi). - Slight waterstain near beginning; front pastedown stamped by the Madrid bookseller Gabriel Sanchez. (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 10794/10799. Göllner 1061 (pt. 1 only). Adams C 1269. BM-STC Italian 165. Atabey 211. Jöcher I, 1804. Cf. Apponyi 381 (pt. 1, 1st issue only). Not in Blackmer.
 

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72 Chair, Somerset de. The Golden Carpet. (London), the Golden Cockerell Press, (1943). Large 4to. 128 pp. With a portrait frontispiece. Original green half calf and cream cloth boards. Includes: Autograph letter signed. No place, 29 June 1943. 8vo. 2 pp. Additional material.
  € 2,800
First edition. An account of the British Army's 1941 campaign in the Middle East, advancing from the Mediterranean to Baghdad. Published during the ongoing war, with several poetic pieces about the Middle East appended. Number 45 of 500 copies printed on Arnold's mould-made paper (nos. 1-30 of which were bound in full morocco). Signed and inscribed by the author to the Anglo-Armenian poet Ernest Altounyan: "for Altounyan / the conversations are resumed (on paper), with the author's sincere friendship / Somerset de Clair / 21 June 1943". Tipped in is a 2-page ALS from the author to Altounyan: "Let me lay the Golden Carpet before you. I have used you in the preface as a link between the Levant fighting in this war and the Revolt in the Desert [...]". He discusses some "security cuts" made to the ms. before publication, "such as the fact that [...] Glubb had only 150 men with him in the Desert Patrol although he was so much feared by the Iraqis." - Altounyan, based in Syria, wrote "Ornament of Honour" in 1937 addressed to T. E. Lawrence, written in Aleppo after Lawrence's death. He had known Lawrence for a long time and wrote the poem as a memorial embodying everything he believed to be their common philosophy of life. Of Altounyan, Lawrence wrote (in a letter to Robert Graves): "I think Frederick Manning, and an Armenian called Altounyan and E. M. Forster are three I most care for since Hogarth died." - Laid in is an autograph letter signed (21 April 1945, 1 p.) to Altounyan from Col. Franklin Lushington, author of "Yeoman Service: A Short History of the Kent Yeomanry 1939-1945", returning the volume with thanks. - Spine sunned; boards somewhat fingerstained; some browning to de Chair's ALS, otherwise in fine condition. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 7080861.
 

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73 Chalkokondyles, Laonikos. L'histoire de la decadence de l'empire grec. Paris, Mathieu Guillemot, 1632. Folio (250 x 360 mm). 4 parts in 1 vol. (16), 1015, (29) pp. 289 cols., (3) pp. 4 pp., cols. 5-128 (+ 2 ff.), (2) pp. 65 ff., 66-114, (4) pp. (several mispaginations). With engr. t. p., 2 engr. plates, and numerous engravings in the text. Contemp. calf. All edges red.
  € 6,500
Chronicle of the early history of the Ottoman empire; one of several editions printed in the same year. First published in its French translation in 1577, this work by the Byzantine historian Chalkokondyles (c. 1423-90) was republished frequently throughout the 17th century, always including the account of Ottoman costumes and an interpretation of the seventeen enigmatic illustrations of Byzantine prophecies foretelling the downfall of the Ottoman Empire. The folding plate depicts a bird’s-eye view of Constantinople with its prominent buildings. The chronicle itself is illustrated by numerous portraits of rulers. The costume plates were originally designed for the travel account of Nicolas de Nicolay (1517-83), first published in 1567 (cf. Lipperheide Lb 2), who had visited the Ottoman court as a diplomat in the services of King Henry II. - Hinges and extremeties professionally repaired. Engraved title closely trimmed at top; slight loss to edge of plate showing the Turkish army as well as one costume plate. Occasional brownstaining and edge defects throughout. From the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Cf. Atabey 214. Navari (Greek) 138. Hage Chahine 860-862. Navari (Greek) 138. Hamilton 23. Not in Blackmer.
 

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74 Champollion, Jean François. Monuments de l'Egypte et de la Nubie. Paris, Firmin Didot Freres, 1835-1845. 4 volumes, broadside folio (c. 715 x 555 mm). Half-titles in volumes 2-4. Chromolithographic additional title and 502 lithographic plates (of c. 512; 4 of the missing plates known in other copies, and the other four listed in the table of contents but possibly not issued) of which 26 hand-coloured, 19 chromolithographs, and one folding. Modern calf-backed boards.
  € 95,000
First edition of Champollion's spectacular atlas of hieroglyphs. A tall copy with deckle edges, comprising more plates than both the Blackmer and Brunet copies. Champollion had succeeded in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs using museum collections, and planned the journey that produced the present book in order to confirm his findings in situ with a broader range of source material. He travelled along the Nile from Alexandria to Aswan, gathering and reproducing hieroglyphic material along the way - much of which had not been published before, as is the case with most of the material from the Nubian temples. Because of a complex publication history, bibliographies do not agree on the number of plates in a complete set, but De Ricci describes 'un exemplaire bien complet' which includes 507 plates (located at the University of Paris Art and Archaeology Library). - Minor wear to boards. Some spotting to interior, some leaves browned, a few marginal tears, of which a very few with old repairs, occasional small marginal dampstain. Small shelf mark ('8066'/'8069') in the foot of the plate list in each volume. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 309 (499 plates only, though possibly less). Brunet I, 1780 (calling for 500 plates). De Ricci 71. Graesse II, 116.
 

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75 Chardin, [Jean]. Journal du voyage du chevalier Chardin en Perse et aux Indes orientales, par la mer Noire et par la Colchide qui contient le voyage de Paris à Hispahan. Lyon, Thomas Amaulry, 1687. 8vo. 2 vols. (24), 438 pp. 439, (9) pp. With engr. portrait frontispiece, additional engr. title, folding engra. map and 15 engr. plates (12 folding). Contemp. French full calf with giltstamped spines. Edges sprinkled in red.
  € 2,800
Second French edition of Chardin's account of his travels in Persia and India. Includes extracts from the Qur'an (sura 26) as well as Muslim religious songs extolling the greatness of Prophet and the city of Mecca. The French traveller Jean Chardin (1643-1713) had spent the years 1665-70 and 1671-77 in the Middle East and is considered the most knowledgeable westerner of his period with regard to Persian geography and customs (cf. Henze). "He apparently knew Esfahan better than Paris and visited nearly every part of the country. His account of the Persian court and his business transactions with the shah are of considerable interest" (Howgego). "The son of a jeweller, Chardin first went to the Levant in 1665 in order to purchase gems. He made a second journey there in 1671, spending much time in the company of the artist Guillaume Grelot, whom he met in Constantinople and whose drawings inspired the engravings in the present work. Chardin's acute observations and valuable insights into oriental life were highly praised by Montesquieu, Rousseau, Gibbon and Helvetius, all of whom drew on his work in their own writings" (Atabey 218). Persecuted as a Protestant, Chardin settled in London in 1681 and was appointed jeweller to the Royal Court. His journal, originally written in French, was first published in an English translation (London, 1686); the same year, the first French edition appeared in Amsterdam - translated back from the English (cf. Howgego). As Chardin did not consider himself qualified to remark on India, the early editions do not include an account of this part of his journey (though it was ultimately published in 1711). - Some browning; spine-ends chipped; a few tears to individual plates professionally repaired. Altogether a good copy. Rare; OCLC cites a single copy (in the BnF), while Quebec appears to possess a four-volume 12mo variant, and a separate first volume is in the Newberry Library. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 457498604. Cf. Howgego I, 216f. Henze I, 557f.
 

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76 (Chiarello, Giambattista). Historia degl' avenimenti dell' armi imperiali contro a' ribelli, et ottomani, confederationi, e trattati seguiti frà le potenze di Cesare, Polonia, Venetia, e Moscovia. Venice, Steffano Curti, 1687. 4to. (24), 575 (but: 577), (13) pp. With engr. title vignette, 6 folding engr. plates and folding engr. map. Contemp. Italian half vellum with giltstamped red spine label. All edges red.
  € 7,500
First edition of this rare chronicle of the Turkish wars of 1683-86. Includes an extensive account of the siege of Vienna, a fine map of Hungary, and plans of Vienna, Esztergom, Nové Zámky, Košice, Buda, and the bridge of Osijek. - Some browning and brownstaining due to paper; occasional underlinings in red pencil. (more)
  ¶ STC 225. Apponyi 1304. Kelényi 1162. Sturminger 966 & 3839.
 

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77 [Chmielenski, Constant; Pseud.:] Constant de Tours. Le Train d'Orient et les voyages par terre et par mer de Paris a Constantinople. Paris, Societé Francaise d'éditions d'art, [1903]. Large 4to. 272 pp. Publisher's original illustrated red cloth, stamped in gold and black. All edges gilt.
  € 450
Second edition of this popular, profusely illustrated guide through the countries and places visited by the Orient Express, which took up service in 1883. The elaborate art nouveau binding recalls that of the first edition, published by Émile Gaillard in 1894. - Some browning throughout, but well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 457665773.
 

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78 Churi, Joseph H. Sea Nile, the Desert, and Nigritia. Travels in Company with Captain Peel, R.N. 1851-1852. [...] With Thirteen Arabic Songs, as Sung by the Egyptian Sailors on the Nile. London, published by the author, 1853. Large 8vo. XII, 331, (1) pp. With wood-engraved frontispiece of the Homra tree. Original publisher's brown boards with title in gilt to spine.
  € 2,000
First edition. - The Lebanese Maronite Churi trained at the Congregation of Propaganda in Rome from 1842 to 1849. He later left Rome and made his way to London, where he gave lessons in Arabic, Latin, Italian, and Hebrew. Captain W. Peel was amongst his pupils and persuaded him to accompany him on a tour of the Middle East between October 1850 and February 1851. The present work is an account of a second journey the pair undertook to Egypt and the Sudan between August 1851 and February 1852. - Some wear to spine and boards. Mild occasional foxing, otherwise in very good condition. Nice original, unblemished yellow endpapers. Rare. (more)
  ¶ Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 135 (erroneously s. v. "Chusi"). OCLC 4709982. Not in Gay.
 

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79 Clermont-Ganneau, Charles (ed.). Histoire de Calife le pêcheur et du Calife Haroun Er-Rechid. Conte inédit des Mille et une Nuits. Jerusalem, typographie de Terre Sainte, 1869. 8vo. 128 pp. Original printed blue wrappers.
  € 2,500
First separate edition of this tale from the Thousand and One Nights. The Arabic text, printed here in its entirety with a French translation by the editor, is taken from the six-volume Constantinople edition. - Insignificant edge defects, otherwise a good, sound copy. Rare. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin VI, 18. OCLC 4447422.
 

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80 Clodius, Johann Christian (praes.) / Clodius, Heinrich Jonathan (resp.). Scopelismi criminis Arabiae Rudera e varii generis antiquitatibus excussa [...]. Leipzig, Zeidler, 1730. 4to. (2), 38 pp. Papered spine.
  € 500
Only edition. - Rare Leipzig dissertation, composed under the Arabist J. C. Clodius (1676-1745), on the ill-documented Arabian practise of "scopelism" as recorded by Ulpian: apparently a custom according to which a large rock was placed upon a field as a deadly warning to one's enemy. While the author draws mainly from Greek sources, the work does contain several passages in Arabic type. - Some browning. Duplicate from the Gotha Library (ms. note to title page). (more)
  ¶ OCLC 850971637.
 

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81 Conseil Sanitaire Maritime et Quarantenaire d'Égypte. Rapport sur le Pèlerinage au Hedjaz de l'année de l'Hégire 1353 (A.D. 1935). Alexandria, A. Procaccia, 1935. Folio (313 x 242 mm). (2), 103, (1) pp. With a folding map, 4 photo plates, 1 diagram plate, and 5 folding tables.
  € 750
Statistical analysis of the health care and logistics of the Hajj of 1353 (AD 1935), covering the origins, travel routes, illnesses etc. of the roughly 80,000 pilgrims who visited the Holy Sites of Islam that year. The present volume is the eighth in the extremely rare series covering the early-20th-century Hajj, a period of transition toward steeply increasing numbers of pilgrims, now in excess of three million persons a year. - Upper cover slightly brownstained and dusty, spine slightly chipped, otherwise fine. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 559756723.
 

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82 Contarini, Giovanni Pietro. Historia von dem krieg, welchen newlich der Türckisch Keiser Selim der ander wieder die Venediger erreget hat. In Welscher und Lateinischer Sprach erst außgangen, jetzt aber von Georgen Henisch von Bartfeld verteutschet. Basel, Peter Perna, 1573. 4to. (8), 181, (1) pp. With folding woodcut map. Modern half calf.
  € 12,000
First German edition. - "This is an important source work for the battle of Lepanto. Contarini has written a detailed account of the battle, including the events leading up to it. He includes many interesting statistics - the source of the various ships, numbers of men taking part, etc." (Navari). "One of the most extensive accounts of the Battle of Lepanto, with details as to the Venetian, Spanish, and Papal ships" (cf. Göllner). - Title page numbered; a few old underlinings. Closely trimmed at upper edge (occasionally touching headlines); insignificant brownstaining. Very rare: not a single copy in postwar German auction records. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ VD 16, C 4965. IA 143.974. BM-STC 221. Blackmer 396 (note). Schottenloher 43475 c. Apponyi 1837. Kertbeny 860. Göllner 1617.
 

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The earliest western study of Wahhabism
83 [Corancez, Louis Alexandre Olivier de]. Histoire des Wahabis, depouis leur origine jusqu'a la fin de 1809. Paris, Crapelet, 1810. 8vo. (4), VIII, 222 pp. Somewhat later cloth with giltstamped black label to gilt spine.
  € 3,500
First edition of this fundamental study of Wahhabism, not translated into Arabic until 2005 ("Tarih al-wahhabiyin mundu naš'atihim hatta 'am 1809 m.", published in Riyadh by Darat al-Malik 'Abd-al-'Aziz). Corancez had lived in Aleppo for eight years as French consul. He married a Syrian and had first-hand information about the Wahhabi movement in Egypt, Syria, and Baghdad. He published his book soon after the followers of the Moslem reformer Abd-el Wahhab conquered the holy cities of Mecca and Medina in 1805, an event that fueled a strong interest in the movement throughout Europe. "This sect, which abhorred all loose living, attracted the attention of a number of travellers. Corancez' account of the Wahabis precedes by many years that of Burckhardt, which was published posthumously in 1830, although both men were living and travelling in Syria at the same time, and presumably knew each other" (Atabey). - Slight brownstaining to beginning and end. Title page stamped "Bibliothéque de Auguste Gerard". Sold for £3,800 at Sotheby's (Atabey sale, contemporary half morocco). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 750. Gay 3461. Querard I, 143. Atabey 282. Not in Blackmer.
 

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84 Cordeiro, Luciano. Batalhas da India. Como se perdeu Ormuz. Processo inedito do seculo XVII. Lisbon, Imprensa Nacional, 1896. 8vo. XV, (1), 297, (1) pp. Original printed wrappers.
  € 650
First edition. Classic, minute account by Luciano Cordeiro (1844-1900) of the events that led to the fall of Hormuz to the Anglo-Persian forces in 1622. Based on contemporary documents, many of which are reproduced here. - Slight edge chipping; evenly browned throughout as common. A good copy. (more)
  ¶ Wilson 48. OCLC 27860289.
 

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85 [Costumes]. Neu-eröffnetes Amphitheatrum [...] aus dem Gantzen America [...] Asia [...]. Neu-eröffnetes Amphitheatrum Turcicum. Erfurth, Johann Michael Funcke, 1723-1728. Folio (214 x 342 mm). 3 vols. bound in one. (4), 120 (instead of 124) pp. (2), 142 pp. 172, (4) pp. Two title pages printed in red and black. With a total of 97 (instead of 98) half-page woodcuts in the text. Period style dark brown calf, elaborately gilt decorated spine and boards, red morocco spine label, raised bands, marbled endpapers.
  € 35,000
First editions of three separately issued parts of the very scarce "newly-opened amphitheater", comprising the America, Asia, and Turkey volumes. The exceptional large woodcuts show the native inhabitants of the various parts of the world. Of special interest is the rare volume dedicated only to Ottoman society, as well as that on Asia: together, they cover the Islamic countries of the early modern period, including details on the Arabian Peninsula. Among the illustrations are various Muslim clerics, Northern Arabians and desert Arabians in Bedouin costume, coffee salesmen, sweetmeats salesmen, and a Turkish gentleman carrying the Qur'an on his head, as well as Persians, the Sultan, Janissaries, archers, dancers, etc. The Asia volume, produced later, repeats a single illustration but contains much new matter on Arabia, including a discussion of the Muslim religion, the Qur'an, ablutions performed with sand, and the trade in incense, coffee, and spices, as well as pearl fishing in Bahrain (p. 54). The America volume covers the discovery and exploration of America, with woodcut illustrations including portraits of Columbus, Vespucci, Magellan, and 30 depictions of Native Americans from throughout the New World, including Virginia, California, Pennsylvania, Maryland, etc. - This present set omits the parts on Europe and Africa, which were published first, and thus contains parts 3 (America) and 4 (Asia) of the four-part "Neu-eröffnetes Amphitheatrum" (the final part of which was produced only after a five-year hiatus), along with the "Neu-eröffnetes Amphitheatrum Turcicum", separately issued in 1723, from which the 1728 volume on Asia drew freely. Severely browned throughout due to paper. Title page of "America" vol. remargined; edge-wear to first and last few leaves only; wants quire G (pp. 25-28, including one illustration). Quire K in "Turkey" vol. (pp. 37-40) with expert paper repairs. In a highly appealing modern binding. (more)
  ¶ Lipperheide Ac 5. Colas 2187. Hiler 652. Sabin 52360. Palmer 364. Not in Atabey or Blackmer. Not in Hünersdorff (Coffee).
 

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With one of the earliest depictions of a soccer game
86 [Costumes - Bertelli, Pietro]. Diversarum nationum habitus. Centum et quattuor iconibus in aere incisis diligenter expressi [...]. Padua, Alciato de' Alciati & Pietro Bertelli, 1594. 8vo. 2 vols. (8) pp., 2 frontispieces, 2 engr. t. p., and 182 engravings (2 with flaps) altogether. 19th century auburn calf with gilt fillets, rebacked to style; leading edges gilt; gilt inner dentelle; marbled endpapers.
  € 9,500
Second edition of the two-volume set (in 1596 followed a third volume which would expand the number of engravings to a total of 256). In the engraved title page of volume I, the date of printing has been corrected from "1592" to "1594". A very fine costume work: most of the plates show a single person (or small groups of people) in typical local and professional costume, with identifiying captions. Some plates are of ethnological interest, such as one of a Congolese gentleman being carried about in a hammock. Others depict curious scenes: Venetians fighting for show and in earnest, St Mark's Square and boats on the Canal Grande (with the Rialto Bridge), as well as games (soccer, and a vicious entertainment that involved battering a cat to death), busts of famous men, etc. Of special interest are the two plates with flaps: one of young ladies in a canopied gondola, another of a similarly obscured Turkish lady on horseback (in both cases, the women can be revealed by lifting the engraving of the curtain). The set is generally strong in Middle Eastern costumes, including many Ottoman nobles, courtiers, and commoners, Persians, "Arabs habitu gentili", "Arabs Nobilis", etc. - Some brownstaining and fingerstaining; title pages trimmed and remargined; old ms. ownerships cancelled. An appealingly bound copy. (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 5608. Brunet I, 815. Lipperheide Aa 32 (= 20). Hiler 83. Colas 316. Vinet 2092. Thieme/Becker III, 488. IA 117.999. Cf. Cicognara 1589. BM-STC Italian 90. Not in Adams.
 

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87 [Arabian Peninsula]. - Cox, Percy. Some Excursions in Oman. In: The Geographical Journal. Vol. LXVI No. 3 (September 1925). London, The Royal Geographical Society, 1925. 8vo. pp. 193-227 (entire volume: viii, 193-288 pp., with 22 photographic illustrations and a folding colour map). Original printed blue wrappers.
  € 800
Extensive account of an expedition in the hinterlands of Oman (much of which is now territory of the United Arab Emirates) undertaken by Major-General Cox: from Abu Dhabi to Baraimi and onwards to Jabal Akhdhar (or Green Mountains) and back to Muscat by the Wadi Samail, and from Ras-al-Khaima to Baraimi, then directly onwards to the coast at Shinas and on by the shore to Sohar. The illustrations show Fort Jalali in Muscat, Beni Habib Village in Jabal Akhdhar, the entrance to Elphinstone Inlet, Idaiyeh, the Masaikin Plain, the fort at Nejwah, Tanuf, Jabal Khidr: a peak of the Jabal Akhdhar, a view of the Wadi Mi'aidin towards Birkat al Moz in Sharaija, and Muti, at the base of Jabal Akhdhar. The folding double map shows the travel route (with a highly detailed plan of the area between Ras-al-Kahimah in the North and the Baraimi Oasis in the South). - Sir Percy Cox (1864-1937), longtime Acting Political Resident in the Gulf, is regarded as one of the major figures in the creation of modern Iraq. He was to serve as president of the Royal Geographic Society from 1933 to 1936. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 772.
 

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88 [Arabian Peninsula]. - Craufurd, C[harles Edward Vereker]. The Dhofar District. In: The Geographical Journal. Vol. LXIII No. 2 (February 1919). London, The Royal Geographical Society, 1919. 8vo. pp. 97-105 (entire volume: iv, 65-128 pp., with 18 photographic illustrations and a folding colour map). Original printed blue wrappers.
  € 650
Early account of a visit to the seaport of Dhofar (Oman) on the southern coast of the Peninsula, including an interesting account of the local boats and the sailing skills of their owners. The illustrations show Makalla in Hadramaut, a camel drawing water in Dhofar, and the ruins of the temple of al-Bilad. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 777. OCLC 49427292.
 

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89 [Arabian Peninsula]. - Craufurd, C[harles Edward Vereker]. The Dhofar District. (From: The Geographical Journal. Vol. LXIII No. 2 [February 1919]). London, The Royal Geographical Society, 1919. 8vo. pp. 97-105. With 2 photoplates. Modern wrappers.
  € 250
Early account of a visit to the seaport of Dhofar (Oman) on the southern coast of the Peninsula, including an interesting account of the local boats and the sailing skills of their owners. The illustrations show Makalla in Hadramaut, a camel drawing water in Dhofar, and the ruins of the temple of al-Bilad. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 777. OCLC 49427292.
 

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90 Crichton, Andrew. History of Arabia, ancient and modern. Edinburgh, London , Oliver & Boyd; Simpkin & Marshall, 1833. 8vo. 2 vols. 464 pp. 464 pp. Each volume with a steel-engraved illustration on the title-page (Muhammad in vol. 1, the city of Mocha in vol. 2), folding steel-engraved map of Arabia (29 x 23 cm); 3 wood-engraved full-page plates; 5 wood-engraved illustrations in text, table in text. 20th-century red half sheepskin, marbled boards, marbled edges.
  € 1,500
First edition of a history of Arabia from ancient to modern times by the biographer and historian Andrew Crichton (1790-1855). It contains extensive descriptions of Arabia's geography and natural history, an account of its inhabitants, antiquities, political condition, and early commerce, the life and religion of Muhammad, the origin and suppression of the Wahhabis, the Caliphs of Baghdad, Hejaz, the Hajj, and much more. The illustrations include depictions of the entrance to Petra, Medina and the Mosque of the Prophet, an Arab of rank in Yemenite costume, Mecca during the pilgrimage, a young female of the Coffee Mountains, and Abdallah ibn Saoud, Chief of the Wahhabis. Label pasted on spine, library label of the Southworth Library on inside front cover, embossed stamp on title-pages. Some minor shelf wear, second volume soiled on pp. 179-215, otherwise in good condition. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 780. Gay 3462. OCLC 11689514. pkpk

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91 [Crnka, Fran / Alfonso de Ulloa?]. Historia di Zighet, ispugnata da Suliman, re de' turchi, l'anno MDLXVI. Nuovamente mandata in luce. Venedig, Bolognino Zaltieri, 1570. 4to. 24, (2) pp. With woodcut printer's device to t. p. 18th century marbled wrappers.
  € 2,500
Rare second Italian edition (published a year after the almost unobtainable first Turin printing) of this historically important account of the events of the Battle of Szigetvár, fought between the Turkish and the Habsburgian forces. The final page treats the number of Turkish soldiers killed in the battle. - On 8 September 1566, after a month-long siege, the Ottoman army captured the fortress of Szigetvár and beheaded the defender, Miklós Zrínyi; more than 20,000 soldiers died. Shortly before the decisive battle, Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent, who personally led the campaign, died of old age after a reign of 46 years - the longest in Ottoman history. In spite of the Turkish victory, the death of their leader, the heavy losses suffered during the siege, and an early winter caused the Ottoman army to withdraw to Istanbul. Only in 1689 did the Hungarians re-capture the city. - The first edition ("Historia Sigheti") was published in Latin by Caspar Stainhofer in Vienna in 1568. It was purportedly a translation from the Croat language, prepared by Samuel Budina (cf. Apponyi 422). The supposed author, Fran Crnka (Ferenc Czerno), was Zrínyi's surviving chamberlain. According to Göllner, the actual author (though more likely, the editor) may have been Alfonso de Ulloa (d. 1580), who also published "Commentari della Guerra" and "Historie di Europa", both appearing at Zaltieri's press in the same year as the present work. - Extremely rare; a single copy at auctions internationally since 1950. (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 13812. Apponyi 439. Göllner 1270. BM-STC Italian 652. Hammer 761. Szabó 603. Ballagi 718. Hubay 277. OCLC 64419121. Not in Adams.
 

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92 [Cyanea]. Cyanea. Oder die am Bosphoro Thracico, ligende hohe Stein-Klippen. Von welchen zu sehen seyn, gegen Mittag das Vor-Meer Propontis, mitternachts das Schwartze-Meer, Pontus Euxinus, mit denenselben umbligenden Ländern, wie auch den Insulen Cypern und Candien. Augsburg, Astaler f. Enderlin, 1687. 8vo. (4), 74, (2) pp. With 27 (17 folding) engr. plates and folding engr. map. Contemp. vellum (wants ties).
  € 12,000
One of several descriptions of the Mediterranean published by Enderlin. Includes reports of Constantinople, Moscow, and Kiev as well as the islands of Cyprus, Crete, and the Crimean. The plates show views of Candia, Canea, Famagusta, Kaminiek and Constantinople, as well as plants and animals. - Index to illustrations cropped and mounted on reverse of title. Some browning and brownstaining. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 23:279658Z. Blackmer 1303. Cf. Atabey 402.
 

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93 [Dapper, Olfert]. Umbständliche und eigentliche Beschreibung von Asia: In sich haltend die Landschafften Mesopotamien, Babylonien, Assyrien, Anatolien oder Klein-Asien. Ins Hochteutsche getreulichst übersetztet von J. Ch. Beern. Nuremberg, Froberg f. Hoffmann, 1681. Folio (220 x 332 mm). (8), 556, (12) pp. With engr. frontispiece, 3 double-page-sized engraved maps, 20 engr. plates (13 double-page-sized, 1 folding), and 8 engravings in the text. Contemp. calf with gilt spine.
  € 6,000
First German edition of Dapper's description of the Middle East, including Mesopotamia or Algizira, Assyria, and Anatolia; the second part is entirely devoted to Arabia. Dapper's work is of special importance for its original and new information on Islam, Arab science, astronomy, philosophy, and historiography, as well as for its illustrations. "Dr. Olfert Dapper (1636-1689), physician, geographical and historical scholar, was the author of a series of works dealing with Africa, America and Asia. The fine plates [...] are after a number of mapmakers and artists, including Christiaan van Adrichom, Juan Bautista Villalpando and Wenzel Hollar among others" (Blackmer). Includes accounts of Mecca (with a description of the Hajj), Jeddah, Medina, Sana'a, etc. The engravings show costumes, religious rites, specimens of local flora, views, etc., including Aden, Mocha, Maskat, Babylon, Baghdad, Ninive, Ephesus, and Smyrna (re-engraved from the Dutch original edition). - Old repair to view of the Tower of Babylon (slight loss to image). Engraved armorial bookplate "ex Bibliotheca Blomiana" to pastedown. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 39:133144U. STC D 200. Blackmer 450. Tiele 300 (note).
 

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94 Dickson, H. R. P. The Arab of the Desert. A Glimpse into Badawin Life in Kuwait and Sau'di Arabia. London, Allen & Unwin, 1951. Original publisher's red cloth.
  € 350
Second edition of this classic work. With frontispiece portrait of HH Sheikh Sir Ahmad al Jabir al Sabah, contemporary Ruler of Kuwait. - In very good condition. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 6947893. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 840 (1st ed.).
 

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95 Doughty, Charles M[ontagu]. Travels in Arabia Deserta. London & Boston, Philip Lee Warner / Jonathan Cape, 1921. 8vo. 2 vols. XXVI, 622 pp. XIV, 690 pp. With 2 portraits, 8 plates (5 folding), and coloured lithogr. map, loosely stored in cover compartment. Original cloth.
  € 950
First reprint of the 1888 first edition. - Doughty's journey, undertaken between 1875 and 1878, "did much to advance knowledge of north-western and central Arabia" (cf. Henze). - Insignificant browning; some pages uncut. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 859. Howgego III, D29. Cf. Henze II, 88 (1888 first ed.). Weber I, 1092 (ed. 1924). NYPL Arabia coll. 166 (1st ed.). Fück 198 (1888 & 1923).
 

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96 Doughty, Charles M[ontagu]. Travels in Arabia Deserta. London, Jonathan Cape, 1936. 2 vols. 674 pp. 696 pp. With two folding maps. Original cloths with giltstamped titles to spine. 4to.
  € 350
"New and definitive edition" of the famous work first issued in 1888, with a new introduction by T. E. Lawrence. Doughty's journey, undertaken between 1875 and 1878, "did much to advance knowledge of north-western and central Arabia" (cf. Henze). - Slight foxing to untrimmed fore-edge, otherwise well-preserved. From the library of Peter Fraser with his bookplate to pastedown. (more)
  ¶ Howgego III, D29. OCLC 6443964. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 859. Henze II, 88 (1888 first ed.). Weber I, 1092 (1924 ed.). NYPL Arabia coll. 166 (1st ed.). Fück 198 (1888 & 1923).
 

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97 Driesch, Gerard Cornelius van den. Historische Nachricht von der Röm. Kayserl. Groß-Botschafft nach Constantinopel [...]. Nuremberg, Peter Conrad Monath, 1723. 4to. (18), 494, (38) pp. With engr. frontispiece and 12 (instead of 13) engr. plates (2 folding). Contemp. calf with giltstamped spine label. Edges sprinkled in red.
  € 3,500
First authorized German edition. Driesch, a native of Cologne, was secretary to Damian Hugo von Pyrmont, ambassador of Charles VI to the Sublime Porte, in which capacity he went to Constantinople in 1719. "Contains unprejudiced accounts of the oriental customs" (cf. Griep/L.). Seven of the plates show portraits, the others show the entrance of the delegation, the audience, a Turkish bath, etc. - Complete save for the plan of Constantinople. Occasional slight browning and waterstaining; binding professionally restored. From the library of the Budapest numismatist and collector Béla Procopius (1868-1945), sometime Hungarian ambassador to Athens, with his stamp on the title page. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 362. Weber II, 484. Lipperheide Lb 29. Hiler 248. Griep/L. 364. Not in Blackmer.
 

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98 Drouville, Gaspard. Voyage en Perse, fait en 1812 et 1813. Troisième édition. Paris, Masson & Yonet, 1828. 2 vols. 8vo. (4), XI, (1), XXV, (26)-264, (2) pp. (4), 259, (1) pp. With 2 engr. frontispieces and 6 engr. plates, all in contemp. colour. Contemp. marbled half calf with double giltstamped spine labels. Marbled endpapers.
  € 850
Third edition. - Drouville was a cavalry officer who went to Persia in the service of the Tsar and spent three years there. His vivid account of Persian manners, customs, and military organisation contains charming costume plates in contemporary colour. - Occasional minor brownstaining; professional repairs to spine-ends. (more)
  ¶ Hage Chahine 1413. Wilson 62. Graesse II, 435. Cf. Howgego II, G2 (1st and 2nd ed.). Henze II, 97. Lipperheide Lc 9. Colas 901. Hiler 249 (all for the 1825 second ed. 1825 only). Schwab 144. Diba Collection p. 180 (first ed.).
 

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99 Duguet, [Juslin]. Le pèlerinage de la Mecque au point de vue religieux social et sanitaire. Par le Docteur Duguet, Médecin General, Inspecteur géneral du Conseil sanitaire, maritime et quarantenaire d'Égypte. Avec une préface de Justin Godart. Paris, Éditions Rieder, 1932. Large 8vo. XII, 337, (1) pp., l. bl. f. Original printed wrappers. With 8 illustrations printed on 4 plates .
  € 450
First edition. - "The true subject of this book is not named in the title, yet two-thirds of the whole are given up to cholera. To introduce his subject the author gives a description of the pilgrimage which is so readable that it is almost ungracious to say that one or two points are open to criticism [...] In the body of the book the author describes the epidemics at Mecca, the hospitals (!), the development of preventive measures outside the Hedjaz, and his hopes for the future. The policies of the Turks, King Husain, and Ibn Sa'ud, the change in defence from long quarantine to inoculation and disinfection, and the growth of the International Sanitary Conference are explained. He records inhuman wickedness and magnificent courage and generosity. A squeamish layman should not read some of the pages just before dinner or bed [...] The conclusion is that all pilgrims should be protected by inoculation against cholera, plague, and smallpox before leaving their homes [...] There are a few misprints, one of which makes the name of Dr. Olschanietzki even less pronounceable than it is by nature. A very useful book" (A. S. Tritton, book review in: Bulletin of the School of Oriental Studies VII, 1 [1933] 224). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 871. OCLC 1931511.
 

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100 East India Affairs. Reports from the Reporters of External Commerce, Bangal, Madras, and Bombay (Private Trade) for the year 1811-12. London, for the House of Commons, 6 December 1813. Folio (205 x 350 mm). 67, (3) pp. Sewn.
  € 850
Includes detailed commercial statistics for the trade produce and exported merchandise of the Arabian and Persian Gulf for the year 1812. - Additional pagination 170-238 by a contemporary hand. Untrimmed copy. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 864084666.
 

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101 [East India Company]. Anno decimo tertio Georgii III. Regis. An Act for establishing certain Regulations for the better Management of the Affairs of the East India Company, as well in India as in Europe. [Fi al-sanath al-salisah `ashar min julus al-Malik Jurj al-Salis. Dasturi bara-yi istihkam-i bandubast-i mushakhkhas banabar bihbudi intizam-i mu` amalat-i Inglish Kampani dar Hindustan chunankih dar Firangistan]. London, Charles Eyre and William Strahan, 1774. Small folio (232 x 280 mm). 36 ff. Contemp. marbled wrappers. All edges gilt.
  € 18,000
The Regulating Act of 1773, published in Persian and English on opposite pages. - British interest in the Persia and the Arabian Gulf originated in the 16th century and steadily increased as British India’s importance rose in the 18th century. In the beginning, the agenda was primarily of a commercial character: realizing the region's significance, the British fleet supported Shah Abbas in expelling the Portuguese from Hormuz in 1622. In return, the British East India Company was permitted to establish a trading post in the coastal city of Bandar 'Abbas, which became their principal port in the Gulf. The Company became responsible for conducting British foreign policy in the region, and concluded various treaties, agreements and engagements with Gulf states. In 1763 the EIC established a permanent residency at Bushehr, on the Persian side of the Gulf. By the early 1770s, the East India Company was in severe financial straights due both to corruption and nepotism as well as from steeply declining tea sales to America and heavy annual payments made to maintain the trading monopoly. When approached for assistance, the government enacted legislation to supervise ("regulate") the activities of the Company. This "Act for establishing certain Regulations for the better Management of the Affairs of the East India Company" constituted the first step toward eventual British government control of India, thus radically limiting the role of EIC in the administration of India. In 1784, little more than a decade later, Pitt's India Act would take reforms even further. - Another issue in the same year is known, with identical typesetting, but in which each page of text is enclosed within an engraved frame (these copies are printed in a taller folio format ). Slight edge repairs; spine restored. From the library of William Aldersey, president of the board of trade in Bengal, with his ownership (dated 1774) to recto of f. 1. (more)
  ¶ ESTC T145421. OCLC 560572771.
 

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102 Egerton, Lady Francis. Journal of a Tour in the Holy Land, in May and June 1840. London, Harrison and Company, 1841. 8vo. (8), 141, (3) pp. With lithogr. frontispiece and 3 lithogr. plates, some illustrations in the text. Original publisher's green blind-stamped decorated cloth, spine title in gold.
  € 450
First edition of this journal of a tour through the Holy Land, printed for private use to support a school for Irish girls. The journal provides interesting information on the many cities and places visited in Holy Land by a lady during the first half of the 19th century. The work includes a lithographed frontispiece and 3 lithographed plates, made from original drawings by Lord Francis Egerton, and some illustrations in text. The society for which the journal was published was formed in 1823 having as its sole object the temporal and eternal interests of the female population of Ireland. - Corners of binding slightly bumped. Good, untrimmed copy of a travel account by a lady's visit to the Holy Land. (more)
  ¶ Abbey, Travel 384. Abboussouan 302. Blackmer 536. Weber I, 323. Röhricht 396. Robinson, Wayward women, p. 112. Tobler p. 164.
 

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The ancient trading routes
103 Eichhorn, Johann Gottfried. Geschichte des ostindischen Handels vor Mohammed. Gotha, Carl Wilhelm Ettinger, 1775. 8vo. X, 82 pp. Wrappers.
  € 3,500
First edition of this exceptionally rare study in historical economics, exploring the ancient trade routes to East India and Arabia in pre-Muhammadian times, citing many Greek sources. The linguist J. G. Eichhorn (1752-1827) was professor of oriental languages at Göttingen, where he also taught political history and literary history. - A very clean, well-preserved copy: contemporary note of acquisition on title page; two typographical errors noted on the errata page have been corrected by the owner. (more)
  ¶ Kress 7102. Roscher 913. ADB V, 731. OCLC 65352288.
 

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104 Elphinstone, Mountstuart. An account of the Kingdom of Caubul, and its dependencies in Persia, Tartary, and India. London, Longman and others, 1815. 4to (268 x 205 mm). 675 pp. With 2 maps, one folding, 14 aquatint plates, all but one coloured by hand. Contemporary straight-grained brown morocco gilt by Lubbock of Newcastle (rebacked). Marbled endpapers.
  € 9,500
Rare first edition of this detailed account of Kabulistan. The pretty engravings mainly depict costumes. "According to A. Janta, Elphinstone's encompassing scope and psychological insight have never been surpassed: for the historically leaning ethnologist, Elphinstone's work remains a source of the very highest caliber" (cf. Henze). - Armorial bookplate of John Waldie. Small tears to folding map professionally repaired. (more)
  ¶ Howgego II, E10. Abbey, Travel 504. Tooley (1954) 209. Wilson 66. Henze II, 165. Lipperheide Ld 16. Colas 960. Hiler 269. Brunet II, 966. Graesse II, 469.
 

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105 Elphinstone, Mountstuart. An account of the Kingdom of Caubul, and its dependencies in Persia, Tartary, and India: comprising a view of the Afghaun nation, and a history of the Dooraunee monarchy. The second edition, with an entirely new map. London, Longman et al., 1819. 8vo. 2 parts in one volume. XXIII, 512 pp. XII, 495 pp. With 14 (13 hand-coloured) aquatint plates and an engr. map. Contemp. red half morocco with marbled boards, endpapers and edges.
  € 7,500
Second edition of this detailed account of Kabulistan. The pretty engravings mainly depict costumes. "According to A. Janta, Elphinstone's encompassing scope and psychological insight have never been surpassed: for the historically leaning ethnologist, Elphinstone's work remains a source of the very highest caliber" (cf. Henze). - Occasional insignificant brownstaining. The pretty binding was probably prepared for Lt. Joseph Davey Cunningham (1812-51), who in 1849 published the standard "History of the Sikhs" (his autogr. ownership, "J. D. Cunningham, Caubul", on the flyleaf). Latterly in the collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Abbey 504 (note). Hiler 269. Cf. Lipperheide Ld 16. Colas 960. Henze II, 164. Wilson 66. Howgego II, E10 (first and later eds.). Brunet II, 966.
 

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Vasco da Gama in Hebrew
106 Farissol, Abraham ben Mordecai. [Igeret orhot shalem], id est, Itinera mundi, sic dicta nempe cosmographia. Oxford, Sheldonian Theatre, 1691. (16), 196 pp. (With:) Bobowski, Wojciech / Hyde, Thomas. Tractatus Alberti Bobovii Turcarum Imp. Mohammedis IVti olim interpretis primarii, de Turcarum liturgia, peregrinatio Meccana, circumcisione, aegrotorum visitatione etc. Ibid., 1690. (2), 31, (1) pp. Marbled half calf with giltstamped title to spine. Top edge gilt.
  € 8,500
First Latin edition of the cosmographical and geographical work of Abraham Farissol, first published in Hebrew in 1586. Includes the Hebrew text together with the Latin translation by Thomas Hyde and copious notes, including sections in Arabic. Farissol incorporated accounts of Portuguese and Spanish exploration including the New World and Vasco da Gama's voyage to India. Also includes a work on Turkish liturgy and the pilgrimage to Mecca by Wojciech Bobowski, a renegade Pole employed as a teacher, interpreter and musician at the Ottoman court of Mahomet IV. Composed at the behest of Thomas Smith (1683-1719) during his tenure as chaplain to the English ambassador at Constantinople, the manuscript was bought back to England and translated into Latin by Hyde. - Binding rubbed and chafed, otherwise in good condition. (more)
  ¶ Auboyneau 265 (p. 34). Wing F438. Sabin 60934. Steinschneider 4222 no. 2. Fürst I, 276. Not in Blackmer or Atabey.
 

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107 Faroughy, Abbas. The Bahrein Islands (750-1951). A contribution to the study of Power Politics in the Persian Gulf. An historical, economic, and geogra[p]hical survey. New York, Verry, Fisher & Co., 1951. 8vo. 128 pp. With printed portrait frontispiece (Salman ibn Hamad Al Khalifa, The Sheik of Bahrein), 3 plates (including a colour plate of the Bahrain flag), and a printed map. Contemp. red cloth with printed cover label and giltstamped spine title.
  € 650
Fundamental 1950s study of Bahrain's geography, history, and politics. Includes selected bibliography and an appendix of documents. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 402008. Not in Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula.
 

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The world's nations illustrated: one of the greatest publishing ventures ever, the rarest work to be found complete
108 Ferrario, Giulio (ed.). Il costume antico e moderno o storia del governo, della milizia, della religione, delle arti, scienze ed usanze di tutti i popoli antichi e moderni provata coi monumenti dell' antichita e rappresentata cogli analoghi disegni. Milan, tipografia dell'editore, 1829-1834. Folio (380 x 265 mm). 37 vols. incl. supplements and index. With 7 engr. folding maps, 5 engr. maps, 1619 coloured aquatints (2 double-page-sized), 2 engr. portraits, 2 engr. plates of musical notes, and 4 tables. Late 19th century half calf with giltstamped spine title. Untrimmed.
  € 280,000
Without question the largest pictorial encyclopedia of the world published during the 19th century, and one of the rarest works to be found complete. Printed in a press run of no more than 300 copies, this set is numbered "12" and was inscribed to a friend of the author ("del socio Signor G. Ferrario"); as such, it was printed on superior paper and coloured particularly carefully (according to Brunet, most of the 300 copies produced were issued entirely uncoloured). The purpose of this 37-volume set in large folio format was to provide a complete account of all known parts of the world not only by describing in detail the various peoples' costumes, governments, religion, habits, military, arts and science, but also by showing them in splendid illustrations, all of which are here individually coloured by hand. The engravings include not only many costumes, but also buildings, objects of religious and of everyday use, monuments, historical scenes and much more. The plates are printed on wove paper and bear the publisher's drystamp. In spite of the enormous number of plates, the colouring is meticulous throughout. - Initially planned for no more than 13 volumes (1816-1827) and also published in French, this present Italian edition is the only one that was issued complete with all supplements and the plates in their impressive folio format. - Of the utmost rarity: we could not trace a single complete copy on the market since 1950. Auction records list only the abridged 8vo reprint or single volumes of the present folio edition (Sotheby's, May 28, 2002, lot 426: £8,720 for vol. I, pt. 3 only). Interior shows occasional slight foxing to blank margins. Altogether an excellent, complete set of the luxury edition: uniformly bound, untrimmed and wide-margined. (more)
  ¶ Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 231. Lipperheide Ad 7. Colas 1051. Hiler 311. Brunet II, 1232f.
 

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109 Field, Henry. Camel Brands and Graffiti from Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Iran, and Arabia. Baltimore, American Oriental Society, 1952. Large 8vo. VI, 41, (1) pp. With 43 black-and-white figures on 16 plates. Original printed wrappers.
  € 350
Supplement to the Journal of the American Oriental Society, issued with vol. 72, no. 4. Fundamental study of Bedouin desert camel brands and graffiti found throughout the North Arabian Desert. Includes several graffiti recorded by Alois Musil, T. E. Lawrence, and Lady Anne Blunt, a section on "The Origin and Distribution of Arab Camel Brands" by Hans A. Winkler, and a bibliography. - Wrappers show slight signs of wear, otherwise fine. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 942. OCLC 3453666.
 

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A Scoundrel's Conversion to Islam
110 Finati, Giovanni / Bankes, William John (ed.). Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Giovanni Finati, Native of Ferrara; who, under the name of Mahomet, made the Campaigns against the Wahabees for the Recovery of Mecca and Medina; and since acted as Interpreter to European Travellers in some of the Parts Least Visited of Asia and Africa. Translated from the Italian as dictated by Himself. London, (William Clowes for) John Murray, 1830. 8vo. 2 vols. XXVII, (1), 296 pp. VIII, 430 pp. With folding engr. map. Deep chestnut calf bindings, blindstamped and giltstamped covers with giltstamped title to spine. Sprinkled edges.
  € 8,500
First edition. - "Of all the Western travelers to Mecca, Giovanni Finati is the only out-and-out scoundrel - as the two-volume account of his travels, published in 1830, makes perfectly clear [...] But even scoundrels, apparently, are not immune to the impact of the Hajj" (Lunde). Finati travelled extensively in the Middle East, often acting as guide and translator to European explorers in the region. As a young man, he enlisted in the service of Muhammed Ali, took part in the capture of Mekkah and Medina and converted to Islam. Bankes travelled with Finati to Upper Egypt, Nubia, Syria and Palestine between 1815 and 1818. He also visited Syria with Buckingham, and was great friends with Hobhouse and Byron. The 'Narrative' includes sections on Mekkah and Medina, the Yemen, Jerusalem, Cyprus, Petra, Palmyra and Cairo, together with an eye-witness account of the Massacre of the Mamelukes by Mahomet-Ali. - Occasional slight foxing, but a fine copy in an appealing but later binding. Rare; the Burrell copy (bound in modern half calf) fetched £9,200 at Sotheby's (15 Oct 1999, lot 255); at the previous day's Travel Sale, a copy in poorer condition realised £6,325. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 954. Howgego II, F6. S. Lunde, "The Lure Of Mecca", in: Saudi Aramco World 1974/6, pp. 14-21. Not in Atabey, Blackmer, Cobham-Jeffery, Röhricht or Weber.
 

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111 Findlay, Alexander George. A Directory for the Navigation of the Indian Ocean [...]. Second Edition. With Descriptions of its Coasts, Islands, etc., from the Cape of Good Hope to the Strait of Sunda and Western Australia, including also the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf; the Winds, Monsoons, and Currents, and the Passages from Europe to its various Ports. London, Richard Holmes Laurie, 1870. Large 8vo (160 x 250 mm). (2), VI, (2), VII-XXXVI, 639, 639a-f, 640-1110, (2), 22 pp. With 15 (mostly folding) maps (many in colour) and numerous text ilustrations. Contemp. half calf with giltstamped spine title and fillets.
  € 1,500
Second, enlarged edition of this standard work, first published in 1866. An encyclopedic volume of over 1000 pages with a detailed index. The chapters include descriptions of the coasts and islands of the Cape Colony; coast of Kaffraria and Natal, Eastern Africa; Madagascar and the Mozambique Channel; the coast of Africa, between Cape Delgado and the Red Sea; the Red Sea, etc. In particular, Findlay devotes much attention to the coasts of Arabia and onwards to the Arabian Gulf, providing rich detail on the port of Aden, navigating and anchoring around Ras Arah and Ghubbet Seylan, the population of Masirah Island, the climate of the Gulf and its threats to western health, topography of the coastal settlements, information on the reefs and pearl banks, etc. - Binding rubbed; hinges splitting at top. Some foxing throughout; plates show occasional tears. A later edition (from Humphrey Winterton's library) fetched £720 at Sotheby's in 2003. (more)
  ¶ Mill (Cat. of the RGS Library) 160. OCLC 217065553.

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112 Forbin, Louis Nicolas Philippe Auguste. Voyage dans le Levant en 1817 et 1818. Paris, de l'Imprimerie Royale, 1819. Text vol. in 8vo and atlas in folio (670 x 503 mm). (4), 460 pp. (4), 65 pp. Half-titles in both vols.; 80 lithographed, sepia aquatint or engraved plates and plans, the 8 fine aquatints by Debucourt after Forbin, the lithographed subjects for G. Engelmann after Lecomte, Deseynes, Castellan, Carle, and Horace Vernet, Fragonard, Thiénon, Legros, Isabey and others, large folding engraved plan at the end of text vol. 19th century marbled half calf with giltstamped title to gilt spine.
  € 35,000
First edition. Only 325 copies of this work were produced. "Forbin's was one of the first important French books to use lithography on a grand scale, and the standard of production is equal to that of Napoléon's 'Description de l'Egypte' or Denon's 'Voyage'" (Navari, Blackmer). Forbin succeeded Denon as director of museums in 1816 and was authorised to purchase antiquities for the Louvre (his son-in-law, Marcellus, expedited the acquisition of the recently discovered Venus de Milo). In August 1817 he began a year-long journey to the Levant accompanied by the artist Pierre Prévost and the engineer de Bellefonds. His journey took him to Melos, Athens, Constantinople, Smyrna, Ephesus, Acre, Jaffa, Jerusalem, Cairo, Luxor, and Thebes. - This set includes the frequently lacking 8vo text volume: this has the plan of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre bound at the end with a list of plates which were sold separately. The atlas volume repeats the text (entirely reset in-folio, sometimes found in a separate folio volume) and includes the magnificent, highly desirable plates (after Carle Vernet, Fragonard, Isabey, and Forbin himself, as well as Prevost), which show fine views of Greece, the Dead Sea, Jerusalem, Ramla, Gaza, and Egypt. - Occasional slight foxing, still a splendid copy from the library of the Ducs de Luynes at the Château de Dampierre: their bookplate reproducing the arms of Charles Marie d'Albert de Luynes (1783-1839), 7th Duc de Luynes, on pastedown. The Aboussouan copy (comprising both the folio and the octavo volume) commanded £20,000 at Sotheby's in 1993, while in 2002 the Atabey copy of the folio volume alone fetched £22,000. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 447f. Blackmer 614. Aboussouan 338. Weber I, 68-70. Röhricht 1660. Tobler 144f. Colas 1089. Hiler 321. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 163. Brunet II, 1337. Graesse II, 614. Cf. Lipperheide Ma 16 (2nd ed.).
 

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113 Forster, Charles. The historical geography of Arabia; or, the patriarchal evidence of revealed religion: a memoir, with illustrative maps; and an appendix, containing translations, with an alphabet and glossary, of the Hamyaritic inscriptions recently discovered in Hadramaut. London, Duncan and Malcolm, 1844. 2 vols. 8vo. LXXXIII, (1), 357 pp. VI (but: IV; mispaginated, complete), 509, (3) pp. With 2 large folding plates (1 map, 1 scroll) in pockets at front and 4 plates (including 2 folding plates of inscriptions). Original brown cloth gilt.
  € 1,500
Only edition. "An attempt at the proof of the descent of the Arabs from Ishmael" (Ghani). - Binding slightly rubbed and worn; pocketed scroll plate somewhat frayed at edges. (more)
  ¶ Gay 3570. Brunet 19594. Ghani 136. pkpk
 

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114 Forster, Charles. The Historical Geography of Arabia; or, the Patriarchal Evidences of Revealed Religion: a Memoir, with Illustrative Maps; and an Appendix, containing Translations, with an Alphabet and Glossary, of the Hamyaritic Inscriptions recently discovered in Hadramaut. London, Duncan and Malcolm, 1844. 8vo. 2 vols. lxxxiii, (1), 357 pp; vi, 509 pp, (1), with two large folding frontispiece maps of the Arabian peninsula (56 cm x 41 cm), a large folding chart of inscriptions, 1 engraved plate of inscriptions, and one further folding translation of the same inscription. Lacking - apparently never bound with - the "vignette plate of Nakab el Hajar" supposed to face p. 335. Repairs to both maps.
  € 950
Only edition of this detailed study of place names, tribal geneaologies, and pre-Islamic inscriptions. "An attempt at the proof of the descent of the Arabs from Ishmael" (Ghani). Includes an interesting attack on Edward Gibbon's 'geographical' explanation for the rise of Islam out of Mecca; Forster denounces Gibbon's "scepticism" and "artful insinuations" by pointing out some of his errors in historical geography, meanwhile defending the claim of a Scriptural prophecy in favour of the descendants of Ishmael. (more)
  ¶ Gay 3570. Ghani 136. Brunet 19594. NYPL Arabia Coll. 166. OCLC 4892705.
 

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"An important book in the growing interest of Orientalism" (Ghani)
115 Francklin, William. Observations made on a tour from Bengal to Persia in the years 1786-7. With a short account of the remains of the celebrated palace of Persepolis; and other interesting events. London, T. Cadell, 1790. 8vo. VIII, 351, (1) pp. Handsome period style brown gilt tooled half calf with marbled boards and red gilt morocco label. Period ink inscription on the first page of the Preface: "G. Matcham". With an autograph letter signed from Colonel Francklin to Major Moor, dated 1835, attached to the front endpaper. 4to. 2 pp. Brown ink on laid paper.
  € 2,500
Second edition, with an autograph letter signed by the author. While the writing is not particularly clear, the letter is in very good condition. Most likely from the library of English explorer and Officer of East India Company George Matcham (1753-1833). Being William Francklin's older contemporary, Matcham served in the Company in 1771-85 and extensively travelled across the Near East and the Red Sea on the way from India to England and back (cf. ODNB). William Francklin (1763-1839) was an Officer of the East India Company and a prominent orientalist; member, and in later years, librarian of the council, of the Royal Asiatic Society. He was also a member of the Asiatic Society of Bengal. "A distinguished officer, Francklin also enjoyed considerable reputation as an oriental scholar. In 1786 he made a tour of Persia, in the course of which he lived at Shiraz for eight months as the close friend of a Persian family, and was thus able to write a fuller account of Persian customs than had before appeared. This was published as 'Observations Made on a Tour from Bengal to Persia' (Calcutta, 1788) and was translated into French in 1797" (ODNB). Francklin's account was also published in German the same year as our English edition. The first edition was published in Calcutta in 1788. "An important book in the growing interest of 'Orientalism.' There are numerous references to Hafez. (Francklin's book was read by Byron, among others). The book is also important because of the retelling of comments the author had heard about Karim Khan Zand. The author states eye-witnesses had told him Karim Rhan always rode at the head of his troops; his soldiers liked him; there was nothing great in him but he was considered a just man even though during the last year of his reign he committed some cruel acts. We are also informed that Karim Khan was a 'debaucher.' The author saw a full cycle of Ta'zie during his stay in Shiraz" (Ghani). "Describes Cochin, Tellicherry, Anjengo, Goa, Bombay etc." (Kaul Travels 858). - A very good, handsome copy. (more)
  ¶ Howgego I, E8. Ghani 138. Cox I, 257. Henze II, 165.
 

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116 Frischmuth, Johann (praes.) / Baumann, Andreas (resp.). Exercitium academicum, ad locae quaedam scriptuae illustranda, [...] quibus Turcarum Persarumque doctores Muhammedem veri nominis, et a Deo promissum, fuisse prophetam probare satagunt. Jena, Samuel Krebs' Wwe., 1685. 4to. (24) pp. Numerous passages interspersed in Arabic and Hebrew characters. Papered spine.
  € 650
First edition. - Philosophical dissertation by the German theologian, linguist and oriental scholar Johann Frischmuth (1619-87) about various passages in the Christian Bible which are interpreted by Islam to contain references to the Prophet Muhammad: Deuteronomy 33:2; Psalm 50:2; Isaiah 21:7; Malachi 4:5-6; and John 16:7. - Slightly browned. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 3:009831S. Chauvin XII, 590. Arnold 277. Bibl. de Sacy I, 86f.
 

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117 Fürer von Haimendorf, Christoph. Itinerarium Aegypti, Arabiae, Palaestinae, Syriae, aliarumque Regionum Orientalium. Nuremberg, Abraham Wagenmann, 1621. Small 4to. With fine engraved portrait of the author after Peter Issel to verso of title, engraved armorial device to verso of dedication f., 6 folding engraved plates, and woodcut printer's device to imprimatur f. at end. Contemporary limp vellum.
  € 12,500
First edition, second issue (with title dated 1621). The first complete copy at auction since the Camille Aboussouan sale in 1993. This second issue has two more plates than the first. "Fürer [...] travelled extensively from 1563-66, first in Italy and then to the Ionian Islands, Egypt and Palestine. The work is concerned with the latter, though Fürer does provide some information on Corfu, Zakynthos, Crete and Cyprus. He is the first to give a description of Vesalius's tomb on Zakynthos" (Blackmer). - "Mons Calvarius" plate trimmed just within border at foot; some (mostly light) waterstaining to lower margins, mostly light marginal foxing. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 995. VD 17, 23:247329C. Blackmer 640. Aboussouan 363. Weber II, 191. Ibrahim-Hilmy 249. Gay 53. Tobler 70. Graesse II, 643. Brunet II, 1417 ("volume rare et assez recherché").
 

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118 Gagnier, Jean. La vie de Mahomet; traduite et compilée de l'Alcoran, des traditions authentiques de la Sonna, et des meilleures auteurs arabes. Amsterdam, Wetsteins & Smith, 1732. 8vo. 2 vols. (2), XLII, (6), 460 pp. (6), 413, (32) pp. with 2 engr. frontispieces, 2 engr. title vignettes, and folding plate. Contemp. polished calf bindings with triple cover fillets, spines richly gilt. Marbled endpapers. All edges gilt.
  € 2,800
First edition, long the standard Life of the Prophet. - "This truly excellent, historical biography provides an account of Muhammad's life including all the fables and miracles. The author was the first to use superior, recent sources and usually quotes from the Arabic authors verbatim. His translations are nothing less than brilliant, and his work was long considered the best biography of the Prophet. Many later authors used it" (cf. Enay). Jean Gagnier (1670-1740) taught oriental languages at Oxford. The plate showing the Kaaba in Mecca is based on a ms. in the Bodleian Library. - Insignificant browning. Engraved bookplate to pastedown. A very appealing copy, perfectly preserved. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin XI, pp. 4-7. Gay 3619. Brunet 28000. Silvestre de Sacy 1438. Enay 33.
 

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119 Galenus, Claudius. Methodus medendi, vel de morbis curandis. Thoma Linacro Anglo interprete. Libri quatuordecim. In fine apposuimus quae ipse Linacer recognovit in opere De sanitate tuenda. Paris, Didier Maheu (for Godefroy Hittorp), (June) 1519. Folio (331 x 218 mm). 206 ff. Title within four-part white on black title border with grotesques, putti, etc. Contemporary Venetian half calf, decorated with central knot patterns surrounded by ropework in blind, over oak boards, with one (of four) clasps, remains of others.
  € 25,000
First edition of Thomas Linacre's translation of Galen's principal work on therapeutics; the original Greek text was not published until the Aldine edition of 1525. "Galen stands second only to Hippocrates in importance in ancient Greek medicine. His writings dominated Byzantine, Arabic, and mediaeval medicine for over a millennium, being superseded in anatomy only with Vesalius, in physiology with Harvey, and in pathology with Boerhaave" (Garrison and Morton). In the Abbasid period (after 750 AD), Arab Muslims began to be interested in Greek scientific and medical texts and had some of Galen's texts translated into Arabic. As a result, some texts of Galen exist only in Arabic translation, while others exist only in medieval Latin translations of the Arabic. In some cases scholars have even attempted to translate from the Latin or Arabic back into Greek where the original is lost. - Thomas Linacre (1460?-1524) was the first and most important translator of Greek medical writers; he sought to base medical teaching on the original texts of Galen and Hippocrates, rather than the versions that had come down through Arabic sources. As a physician and Greek scholar, he was at the forefront of the reform of English medicine. He studied in Padua, where he received his M.D. in 1496, and helped edit the Aldine editio princeps of Aristotle (1495-98). Upon his return to England, he received an M.D. at Oxford and taught Greek privately, one of his students being Sir Thomas More. Later he was appointed physician to Henry VIII. He was instrumental in the foundation in 1518 of the College of Physicians of London (later known as the Royal College of Physicians) and was its director until his death. A medical humanist by training, Linacre was also "one of the finest Greek scholars of his day; his major effort, therefore, was directed toward bringing to English physicians a series of classical medical texts that he considered essential and that were, in fact, superior to other medical writings published in England at that time [...] His very considerable Continental reputation, especially in Greek medical scholarship, was clearly recognized by Erasmus: '[...] owing to the studies of Thomas Linacre, Galen has begun to be so eloquent and informative that even in his own tongue he may seem to be less so'" (DSB). - A single small wormhole through first half. Slight fingerstaining and waterstaining to margins near beginning; binding somewhat rubbed and bumped; some contemporary annotations. A fine, crisp copy. (more)
  ¶ Adams G 93. BM-STC French 196. Durling 1971. Wellcome 2634. Brunet II, 1450.
 

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The pilgrimage in the 18th century
120 Galland, [Julien Claude]. Recueil des rits et cérémonies du pelerinage de la Mecque, auquel on a joint divers ecrits relatifs à la religion, aux sciences & aux moeurs des Turcs. Amsterdam & Paris, Desaint & Saillant, 1754. 8vo. IV, 215, (1) pp. (Bound with:) Fénelon, [Gabriel Jacques] de Salignac de la Mothe. Directions pour la conscience d'un Roi, composées pour l'instruction de Louis de France. La Haye, Jean Neaulme, 1748. XII, 107, (1) pp. T. p. in red and black. Contemp. French full calf, spine gilt with floral designs in 5 compartments and giltstamped label. Marbled endpapers. All edges red.
  € 2,800
Only edition. "Galland's account of the rituals surrounding the pilgrimage to Mekkah includes enlightening description of many of the important shrines and sites within the city. Extensive footnotes describe the history and physical appearance of such features as the Kaaba, the Black Stone, and Mount Ararat, as well as explaining relevant Arabic terms and the importance of certain religious figures in the Islamic tradition" (Atabey cat.). "Galland, 'dragoman' or interpreter in the Levant, nephew of the celebrated orientalist Antoine Galland, translated many works into French, the present work being a collected edition of five Arabic and Turkish pieces" (Blackmer). Also contains a discussion of Ottoman science (the "Traduction d'une dissertation sur les sciences des Turcs, et sur l'ordre qu'ils gardent dans le cours de leurs études" by Zaini Efendi, pp. 85-98) and an extensive essay on the Greek island of Chios, ruled by Genoa from 1436 to 1566, when the Ottomans conquered the island (pp. 99-172), as well as an account of the Sultana Esma with Yakub Pasha, governor of Silistria. - Bound at the end is a later edition of Fénelon's well-known Mirror for Magistrates, written for the Dauphin, whose instructor Fénelon was (with contemporary note indexing this second work written on reverse of front flyleaf). - Slight browning throughout; lower half of title page remargined with a lithographed facsimile, extremeties repaired. Altogether an attractive copy; the Atabey copy (in a contemporary morocco binding for the provost of Paris) fetched £10,158 (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 996. Atabey 470. Aboussouan 369. Blackmer 643. Gay 3639. Van Hulthem I, 2509. Grenoble 5218. Nyon 21020. OCLC 13232933.
 

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121 Galland, [Julien Claude]. Recueil des rits et cérémonies du pelerinage de la Mecque, auquel on a joint divers ecrits relatifs à la religion, aux sciences & aux moeurs des Turcs. Amsterdam & Paris, Desaint & Saillant, 1754. 8vo. VIII, 215, (1) pp. Contemp. French marbled full calf with giltstamped spine title and floral designs to spine compartments. All edges red.
  € 4,500
Only edition. "Galland's account of the rituals surrounding the pilgrimage to Mekkah includes enlightening descriptions of many of the important shrines and sites within the city. Extensive footnotes describe the history and physical appearance of such features as the Kaaba, the Black Stone, and Mount Ararat, as well as explaining relevant Arabic terms and the importance of certain religious figures in the Islamic tradition" (Atabey cat.). "This very interesting work contains five separate essays. The first three are translations from Arabic and Turkish authorities; the last two are eye-witness accounts - one a long description of Chios and the other a description of the marriage of Sultana Esma with Yakub Pasha, governor of Silistria" (Navari). "Galland, 'dragoman' or interpreter in the Levant, nephew of the celebrated orientalist Antoine Galland, translated many works into French, the present work being a collected edition of five Arabic and Turkish pieces" (Blackmer). Also contains a discussion of Ottoman science (the "Traduction d'une dissertation sur les sciences des Turcs, et sur l'ordre qu'ils gardent dans le cours de leurs études" by Zaini Efendi, pp. 85-98) and an extensive essay on the Greek island of Chios, ruled by Genoa from 1436 until 1566, when the Ottomans conquered the island (pp. 99-172), as well as an account of the Sultana Esma with Yakub Pasha, governor of Silistria. - Some brownstaining near beginning and end of volume. From the library of Sefik E. Atabey with his collection label on pastedown. Another copy in the same collection, in a contemporary morocco binding for the provost of Paris, fetched £10,158 (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 996. Atabey 470. Blackmer 643. Aboussouan 369. Gay 3639. Van Hulthem I, 2509. Grenoble 5218. Nyon 21020. OCLC 13232933.
 

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122 Garzoni, Pietro. Istoria della repubblica di Venezia in tempo della Sacra Lega contra Maometto IV., e tre suoi successori, Gran Sultani de' Turchi. Venice, Giovanni Manfrè, 1705. Large 4to. (8), 838, (40) pp., final blank f. With several woodcut headpieces. 19th century green half mororcco gilt with marbled covers.
  € 6,500
First edition. - "Garzoni [1652-1719] was appointed official Venetian historiographer in 1692. His work deals mainly with the Sacra Lega and the Venetian victories against the Turks in the Morea during the war of 1684-90" (Atabey, 2nd ed. only). A second volume, a sequel in name only, deals with the War of Spanish Succession and was not appended until 1716. - Binding rubbed, corners somewhat bumped. Interior shows occasional browning, but largely quite clean. A good, wide-margined copy, this has been annotated throughout in pencil by an Arabic hand, probably in the early 20th century. Rare; no copy of the first edition on the market for 25 years. (more)
  ¶ Brunet VI, 25458. Libr. Vinciana 1032. Graesse III, 82. OCLC 832293066. Cf. Atabey 479 (1707-19 second ed. only). Not in Blackmer.
 

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123 Gaudefroy-Demombynes, [Maurice]. Le pèlerinage a la Mekka. Étude d'histoire religieuse. Paris, Paul Geuthner, 1923. Large 8vo. (4), VIII, 332 pp., 1 bl. f. With a frontispiece showing a mural from the Holy Mosque. Original printed wrappers.
  € 650
First edition. - Principal work of the French Arabist Maurice Gaudefroy-Demombynes (1862-1957), a religio-historical study of the pilgrimage to Mecca. The author taught at the École nationale des langues orientales vivantes (now the Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales) and also translated into French the travelogue of the Arabic explorer Ibn Jobair (1145-1217). - Margins slightly browned and brittle, still a very good, untrimmed copy. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1008.
 

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124 Gay, Jean. Bibliographie des ouvrages relatifs a l'Afrique et a l'Arabie. Catalogue méthodique [...]. San Remo & Paris, J. Gay & fils / Maisonneuve & Cie., 1875. 8vo. XI, (1), 312 pp. Contemp. half calf with giltstamped title to spine. Edges sprinkled in red.
  € 350
First edition. - No. 94 of 500 numbered copies of this standard bibliography of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. - Spine and hinges somewhat rubbed, otherwise fair. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1010. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 255. Besterman 167 & 440. OCLC 5665824.
 

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125 General Staff, India, 1917. Some Notes on the Country above Baghdad. Provisional Edition. Simla, Government Central Press, 1917. (6), 29, (1) pp. Original printed cloth with fore-edge flap. 8vo.
  € 950
Only edition. "The area dealt with in this handbook is bounded on the north by the caravan route between Dair-az-Zaur and Mosul, on the east by that between Mosul and Baghdad; on the south by that between Baghdad and Fallujah; and on the west by the river Euphrates. The tract thus defined includes portions of the Baghdad and Mosul Wilayats, and of the Sanjaq of Zaur" (note on p. [iii]). - Some brownstaining to endpapers and edges, otherwise in fine condition. Rare: only two copies in libraries via OCLC (British Library; Texas A&M Univ. Library). From the library of Peter Hopkirk with his bookplate on front pastedown. (more)
  ¶ Catalogue No. O.B. 44. Case No. 17217. OCLC 48133490.
 

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126 Georgiewitz, Bartholomaeus. De Turcarum moribus epitome. Lyon, J. de Tournes, 1558. 12mo. 184, (8) pp. With woodcut printer's device to t. p. and 6 woodcuts in the text. 18th-century calf.
  € 1,800
Second edition (first published in 1553) of this occasional work on the customs of the Turks, a popular subject in mid-16th century Europe. Contains details as to the religious rites and ceremonies of the Muslims, military and agriculture in the Ottoman Empire, the fate of the Christian captives, etc. Several woodcuts show scenes of torture. - Slightly browned throughout; hinges repaired. Title has 18th century ownership stamp of "Sir Richard Betenson, Bart." (the 4th Baronet Betenson, of Bradburn Place, Sevenoaks, Kent, d. 1786). Later in the library of Thomas Perczel de Bonyhad (his 1960 engr. bookplate on pastedown); last in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. Rare: a single copy in America (Harvard Univ. Library, not in OCLC). (more)
  ¶ BM-STC French 200. Adams G 456. Göllner 983. Apponyi 1779. Estreicher VIII, 102. Szabó III, 454. Cartier 405. Németh H 633. OCLC 257552046. Cf. Blackmer 671 (ed. 1566).
 

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127 Gervais-Courtellemont, [Jules]. Mon voyage a la Mecque. Paris, Librairie Hachette, 1896. 8vo. (2), 236 pp. With frontispiece, large folding panorama, and 30 text illustrations. Original illustrated wrappers.
  € 2,000
Rare first edition. Jules Gervais-Courtellemont (1863-1931), a convert to Islam, was one of the very few Western visitors to Mecca during his time. The classic account of his pilgrimage is of special interest due to the numerous illustrations drawn after photographs by the author and documenting buildings that have survived only greatly changed or which have disappeared altogether. - An untrimmed, well-preserved copy with very slight browning. Uncommon; auction records list the 2nd edition only (published in the same year), fetching as much as £950 (Sotheby's, Oct 14, 1998, lot 740); last sold for £750 (Sotheby's, Oct 15, 2003, lot 638). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1016. Howgego III, G10. OCLC 23429140.
 

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128 Gervais-Courtellemont, [Jules]. Mon voyage a la Mecque. Deuxième édition. Paris, Hachette, 1896. 8vo. (2), 236 pp. With frontispiece, large folding panorama, and 30 wood-engraved text illustrations (some full-page). Contemp. green half calf with giltstamped title to spine. Marbled endpapers.
  € 1,000
Second edition. - Jules Gervais-Courtellemont (1863-1931), a convert to Islam, was one of the few Western visitors to Mecca during his time. His classic account of his pilgrimage is of special interest for the numerous illustrations engraved after photographs by the author. Many of the buildings and sites thus documented have since changed significantly or disappeared altogether. - Foxed throughout; old library stamp on t. p. Binding rubbed and bumped; spine faded. From the library of the "Cercle Militaire d'Amiens" with their name giltstamped to lower spine-end. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1016. OCLC 490071086.
 

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129 Giovio, Paolo. Commentario de le cose de Turchi, et del S. Georgio Scanderbeg, Principe di Epyro. Venice, Bernardino de Bindoni), 1544(-1545). 8vo. 50, (2) ff. With small woodcut on final page. Contemp. vellum with ms. spine title ("Vita Di Scanderbec").
  € 9,500
Extremely rare account of the military resistance to Ottoman rule in Albania, led by the Albanian noble George Kastrioti (1405-68), widely known as "Skanderbeg" (from Turkish 'Iskender Bey', 'Lord Alexander'). "A synopsis of Paolo Giovio's 'Commentario delle cose de Turchi' and Marinus Barleti's 'Historia de vita et gestis Scanderbegi'" (cf. Göllner), two of the principal 16th-century works on the man who, as most of the Balkans came under the suzerainty of the Ottoman Empire, increasingly was perceived as the late hero of the western world. "Skanderbeg's military skills presented a major obstacle to Ottoman expansion, and he was considered by many in western Europe to be a model of Christian resistance against the Ottoman Muslims. Skanderbeg is Albania's most important national hero and a key figure of the Albanian National Awakening" (Wikipedia). - Some brownstaining throughout. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 21160. Pétrovitch 20. Göllner 827. Cf. Brunet III, 586.
 

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Containing the first edition of the "Vitae" with the portraits of the Turkish sultans
130 Giovio, Paolo. Vitae illustrium virorum. Basel, Peter Perna, 1578-1577. Folio. 3 works in 5 parts in 1 volume. With a total of 220 woodcut portraits within borders by Tobias Stimmer and 3 titles within woodcut borders. (12), 427, (1) pp. (8), 176, (26), 177-225, (1) pp. (Bound with:) Elogia virorum literis illustrium. Basel, Perna, 1577. (12), 232, (4) pp. (Bound with:) Elogia virorum bellica virtute illustrium. Basel, Perna, 1596. (8), 258, (10) pp. Contemp. vellum with faded ms. title to spine. Ties restored.
  € 15,000
Perfect, wide-margined copy of the three major Renaissance portrait books in contemporary vellum: the fourth collected edition of the "Vitae"; the first to contain the supplement on the lives of the Turkish sultans, which includes eleven portraits. These "are based on a collection of portraits presented by the Turkish admiral Barbarossa to Virginio Orsini in Marseilles which came into the possession of Giovio. It then emerged that they were similar to another collection which Giovio had acquired earlier. The portrait of Mehmet II is supposed to be based on that by Gentile Bellini, which Giovio also claimed was in his own collection" (Atabey). The other two works with portraits of Christopher Colombus, Agricola, Boccaccio, Dante, Machiavelli, Sir Thomas More, and many others are also based on the drawings in Giovio's collection in Como, which were famous for being the most reliable portraits extant. - Front pastedown with contemporary engraved heraldic bookplate and Senecan maxim by a contemporary hand. Occasional slight browning due to paper, otherwise clean and spotless throughout with contemporary owner's signature to title page. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 503. Blackmer 691. VD 16, G 2078, 2067, and 2062. Hieronymus, GG 404, 403a, and 403b. BM-STC German 360 (lists all three works together as "Opera"). Adams G 667 (only the "Vitae"). Sotheby's Cat. The Ottoman World I, 28/V/2002, lot 495 (the complete "Opera", as our copy, but in later binding - £16,730). Brunet III, 584. Lipperheide 487, 486. pkpk
 

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131 [Glen, Joseph]. Shipwreck of the H.E.I.Co.'s Gun Brig "Ariel". O'er true a tale. London, Alfred Boot, 1872. 8vo. 14, (2) pp. (1f. and 15f. representing the printed wrapper).
  € 850
Only edition, signed by the author. - Thrilling, exceedingly rare account of the wreck of the brig "Ariel" in the Arabian Gulf between Basra and Bushehr in a storm on St. Patrick's Day, 17th March, 1820. Of some ninety crewmen, but five reached Kharg Island alive: the surgeon, John Glen; the boatswain, James Johnstone; a seaman named Brown, a boy named Wall, and an unnamed "native cook", and the surgeon wrote this report more than half a century after the event. - Signed by the author on the wrapper cover: "by Joseph Glen", and the title amended by striking out the word "Shipwreck" and substituting "Foundering". The volume includes an 1884 newspaper clipping containing an obituary of the 1796-born Glen, noting how the Sheik of Kharg had received the survivors "with much kindness, and ministered to their wants". Title page stained. No copy in auction records or library catalogues internationally. (more)
  ¶ Not in OCLC.
 

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The complete set in the original Arabic
132 Goeje, M[ichael] J[ohan] de. Bibliotheca Geographorum Arabicorum. Pars I-VIII. Leiden, E. J. Brill, 1870-1894; 1906. 8vo. 8 vols. bound in 4. 20th-c. green half cloth with giltstamped spines and marbled boards. Includes additional vol. 3 in brown half cloth.
  € 15,000
Rare, complete set of this scholarly edition of Arabic travel reports, all in the original Arabic throughout. All first editions; pt. 3 within the set is the 1906 second edition, but the 1877 first edition of that volume is included separately. Contains: Pt. 1) Abu-Ishak-al-Farisi-al-Istakhri, Viae regnorum, descriptio ditionis moslemicae. Pt. 2) Abul-Kasim, Viae et regna, descriptio ditionis moslemicae. Pt. 3) Al-Mokaddasi, Descriptio imperii moslemici. Pt. 4) M. J. de Goeje, Indices, glossarium et addenda ad partes I-III. Pt. 5. Ibn-al-Fakih, Compendium libri Kitab-al-Boldân. Pt. 6) Ibn-Khordadhbeh, Kitâb al-masâlik wa'l mamâlik auctore. Pt. 7) Abii Ali Ahmed ibn Omar Ibn Rosteh, Kitab al-a'lâk An-Nafisa VII. Pt. 8) al-Masudi, Kitâb at-Tanbih Wa'l-Ischrâb. - In excellent condition. From the library of the Dutch scholar Gautier H. A. Juynboll (1935-2010), former president of the Union des Arabisants et d’Islamisants (UEAI). Of the utmost rarity, no copy on the market for the recent decades; complete sets are almost never encountered even in libraries. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1049. OCLC 460363709. pkpk
 

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133 Goeje, M[ichael] J[an] de. Mémoire sur les Carmathes du Bahrain et les Fatimides. Leiden, E. J. Brill, 1886. 8vo. 1 bl. f., (6), 232 pp. Original front printed wrapper cover bound within contemp. red half morocco with marbled boards and giltstamped spine. Marbled endpapers.
  € 2,500
Mémoires d'Histoire et de Géographie Orientales, No. 1, second edition (first published in 1862). Standard work on a mediaeval Shi'a Ismaili group, the Qarmatians of Bahrain, which at this period included much of eastern Arabia as well as the islands that comprise the present state. For much of the 10th century the Qarmatians were the most powerful force in the Persian Gulf and Middle East, controlling the coast of Oman and collecting tribute from the caliph in Baghdad. They instigated what has been termed a "century of terrorism" in Kufa: they considered the pilgrimage to Mecca a superstition and, once in control of the Bahraini state, they launched raids along the pilgrim routes crossing Arabia. In 906 they ambushed the pilgrim caravan returning from Mecca and massacred 20,000 pilgrims. The Qarmatians came close to raiding Baghdad in 927 and sacked Mecca and Medina in 930. The assault on Islam's holiest sites saw the Qarmatians desecrate the Well of Zamzam with corpses of Hajj pilgrims and take the Black Stone from Mecca to Al-Hasa. - The Dutch Arabist and Orientalist de Goeje (1836-1909) taught at the University of Leiden. He was editor of the "Encyclopaedia of Islam" and collated the Bodleian manuscripts of al-Idrisi. - A few contemporary pencil notes in the margins. With an appendix containing relevant Arabic texts. Minor rubbing to binding, but altogether a fine copy of this rare work; no copy in auction records. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1052. OCLC 4738568. Cf. Fück 211 (for Goeje).
 

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134 Gorecki, Leonhard. Descriptio belli Ivoniae, Voivodae Valachiae, quod anno MDLXXIIII, cum Selymo II, Turcarum imperatore, gessit. Huic accessit Io. Lasicii historia de ingressu Polonorum in Valachiam cum Bogdano, & caede Turcarum. Frankfurt, Wechel, 1578. 8vo. 156, (2) pp. With woodcut printer's device to title page. Modern vellum.
  € 8,500
Joint printing of these two works by Leonhard Gorecki and Johann Lasicius about the Romanian struggle against Turkish rule. A German version in quarto was published simultaneously. The account includes the insurgencies of the Valachian governors Bogdan and Ivonia in 1572 and 1574. With the support of Polish troops the Romanians achieved an early victory against the Ottomans, but their luck changed with the assassination of Ivonia. - A clean copy, formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ VD 16, G 2666. BM-STC German 364. Göllner 1693. Kertbény 898. Estreicher XVII, 247. Schottenloher 43476 a. Graesse III, 119.
 

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135 Gouin, Édouard. L'Égypte au XIXe siècle. Histoire militaire et politique, anecdotique et pittoresque de Méhémet-Ali, Ibrahim-Pacha, Soliman-Pacha. Paris, Paul Boizard, 1847. 4to. (4), IV, 470, (2) pp. With 20 coloured wood-engraved plates. Contemp. marbled half cloth with giltstamped spine title.
  € 750
Only edition of this military and political history of Egypt in the early 19th century, illustrated with coloured plates after drawings by J.-A. Beaucé. - Some foxing throughout; plates rather severely browned due to paper. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 271. Gay 2043. Sander 306.
 

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136 Griffiths, Julius. Travels in Europe, Asia Minor, and Arabia. London, T. Cadell & W. Davies (printed by John Brown in Edinburgh), 1805. Large 4to. XIX, (1), 396 pp. With engraved frontispiece (W. I. Thomson pinx., E. Mitchell sculp.), engr. folding map, and 4 engr. plates (2 folding). Later marbled half calf with giltstamped red spine label.
  € 1,200
First edition, dedicated to the travel writer Elizabeth Craven (Margravine of Brandenburg-Ansbach, formerly wife of the Earl of Berkeley, and friend of Horace Walpole). Griffiths travelled the Orient in 1785 in Greek disguise. His journey took him via Constantinople and Chios, Smyrna, Sardis, Konia, and Taurus to Syria, Antioch, and Aleppo. In Mascat, Oman, he gives a rather baffled account of an oriental dance ("nautch"). - Some browning due to paper, but well-preserved. An untrimmed copy. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 530. Blackmer 755 (wanting half-title). Weber II, 607 (counting 2 plates only). Gay 3573. Graesse III, 155. OCLC 4951921.
 

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137 Guer, Jean-Antoine. Moeurs et usages des Turcs, leur religion, leur gouvernement civil, militaire, et politique, avec un abrégé de l'histoire ottomane. Paris, Coustelier Merigot & Piget, 1746-1747. 4to. 2 vols. (4), XXIV, 453, (19) pp. (2), VIII, 537, (2) pp. With engr. title vignette, 10 engr. initials, 20 engr. text vignettes, 2 engr. frontispieces, and 28 engr. plates. Contemp. calf gilt with giltstamped spine labels.
  € 6,500
First edition (vol. 2: second ed.). "This work is especially valued for its engravings of Turkish costume figures and genre scences by Duflos after Boucher and Hallé" (Navari Greek), as well as for "its fine folding panorama of Constantinople" (Atabey). "The French writer and jurist Guer (1713-64) had not travelled. His work is based on a wide knowledge of historiography and travel literature. It is singled out by the high quality of its wealth of illustrations" (cf. Chatzipanagioti-Sangmeister). The first edition was published by Coustelier in Paris, 1746-47; the same year saw the second edition (Merigot & Piget in Paris) as well as the third (Mortier in Amsterdam). Nearly all sets in the trade are mixed copies. - A good, nearly unbrowned copy from the library of Baron Karl Ludwig von Pöllnitz with his autograph ownership to titles. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 534. Auboyneau 301. Blackmer 762. Weber II, 761. Chatzipanagioti-S. 382. Cohen/R. 465. Colas 1348. Hiler 401. Hage Chahine 2000. Navari (Greek) 308. Sander 872. Brunet II, 1783. Cf. Aboussouan 308. Lipperheide Lb 31 (Mortier).
 

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138 Guer, Jean-Antoine. Moeurs et usages des Turcs, leur religion, leur gouvernement civil, militaire, et politique, avec un abrégé de l'histoire ottomane. Paris, Merigot & Piget, 1747. 4to. 2 vols. (4), XXIV, 453, (19) pp. (2), VIII, 537, (2) pp. With 2 engr. title vignettes, 10 engr. initials, 20 engr. text vignettes, 2 engr. frontispieces, and 28 engr. plates. Contemp. calf gilt with giltstamped spine labels.
  € 5,800
Second issue in the year of first publication. "This work is especially valued for its engravings of Turkish costume figures and genre scences by Duflos after Boucher and Hallé" (Navari Greek), as well as for "its fine folding panorama of Constantinople" (Atabey). "The French writer and jurist Guer (1713-1764) had not travelled. His work is based on a wide knowledge of historiography and travel literature. It is singled out by the high quality of its wealth of illustrations" (Chatzipanagioti-Sangmeister). The first edition was published by Coustelier in Paris, 1746-47; the same year saw the second edition (Merigot und Piget in Paris) as well as the third (Mortier in Amsterdam). - Inconspicuous repairs to folds of Constantinople view; occasional slight browning. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 534. Auboyneau 301. Blackmer 762. Weber II, 761. Chatzipanagioti-S. 382. Cohen/R. 465. Colas 1348. Hage Chahine 2000. Navari (Greek) 308. Sander 872. Cf. Aboussoan 308. Lipperheide Lb 31 (Mortier). Brunet II, 1783 (1746).
 

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139 Guerreiro, João Tavares de Velez. Jornada, que Antonio de Albuquerque Coelho, governador, e capitaõ general da cidade do Nome de Deos de Macao na China, fez de Goa atè chegar á dita cidade no anno de 1718. Dividida em duas partes. Lisbon, Officina da Musica (Jayme de la Te y Sagau), 1732. 8vo. (16), 427, (1) pp. With each page in a frame of thick-thin rules, mitred at the corners, 4 woodcut headpieces (plus 1 repeat) including 1 with the Portuguese coat of arms, 1 woodcut tailpiece, woodcut decorated initials. Contemp. tanned sheepskin, gold-tooled spine with red morocco label, rebacked.
  € 9,500
Second edition (after the 1718 Macao edition printed entirely from woodblocks) of a journal of the voyage of António de Albuquerque Coelho (ca. 1682-1745) from Goa in India to Macao on the coast of southern China. The journal was written by João Tavares de Velez Guerreiro, a captain in the Portuguese navy serving in India, who accompanied the governor on the voyage as his chief of staff. Coelho had been appointed governor of the city of Macao in 1717, and they arrived there in May 1718. They travelled via Madras, through the Malay peninsula and along the coasts of Indochina and China. Part 1 gives an account of the voyage itself and part 2 an account of their stay in Johor at the southern tip of the Malay peninsula, where they played a role in a Sumatran adventurer's coup d'état. The two parts of the text are not bibliographically separate, part 2 beginning on p. 187, halfway through quire M. The publisher Jaime (or Jayme) de la Te y Sagau, better known for his musical publications and his own musical compositions, dedicated the book to the Duke of Cadaval, ending the dedication with a sonnet. It mentions the first Duke, Nuno Álvares Pereira de Melo, but he appears to have died in 1725 or 1727, so it may be directed to the third Duke Jaime (1684-1749). - Printed on thick paper. With a 1732 inscription on the title-page. The first few leaves are slightly tattered at the fore-edge, not approaching the text, and have been professionally restored, and there are some stains on the fore-edge. Boards show a few minor cuts and scrapes, but binding remains in good condition. A valuable eye-witness account of India, Southeast Asia and China in 1718. (more)
  ¶ Howgego A47. Cordier, Sinica 3219. Löwendahl 377. PorBase (4 copies).
 

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140 Hadji Abd-el-Hamid Bey (L[ouis-Laurent] du Couret). Les mystères du désert. Souvenirs de voyages en Asie et en Afrique. Paris, E. Dentu, 1859. 2 vols. 12mo. XXXIV, (2), 492 pp. (4), 484 pp. With 2 folding maps. Contemp. marbled red half calf with giltstamped title to spine. Marbled endpapers.
  € 950
First edition. - The French traveller L. du Couret (1812-67) is said to have made his first journey to the East in 1836, joining the Egyptian army in Syria and visiting Nubia, Senner, Kordofan, and Darfur. He states that he embraced Islam and made the pilgrimage to Mecca. He remains a dubious character, and some critics have even doubted his existence, attributing his works to the imagination of Alexandre Dumas père, author of the "Three Musketeers", who at least contributed a preface to du Couret's 1854 "Voyage au Pays des Niam-Niams". (more)
  ¶ Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 6. OCLC 10196303. Cf. Gay 29. NYPL Arabia coll. 166 (1860 ed.).
 

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141 Hakluyt, Richard. The Second Volume of the Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation, made by Sea or over-land to the South and South-east parts of he World, at any time within the compasse of these 1600 yeres. Divided into two severall parts. London, George Bishop, 1599. Large 4to. 213, 204 pp. Modern maroon morocco (by Jenkins and Cecil) on raised band with gilt dentelles; decorative gilt floral stamping between boards. All edges gilt.
  € 4,500
Second edition. - Principal work of the great English geographer Hakluyt (1552-1616), containing a wealth of travel reports, mainly by captains and explorers who had visited countries important for the English trade. The present volume is dedicated to Northern Africa and the Middle East, including Egypt, the Mediterranean, and the Holy Land, "as also to Arabia, downe the River of Euphrates, to Babylon and Balsara", continuing through the Arabian Gulf to "Ormuz, Chaul, Goa, and to many Islands adioyning upon the South parts of Asia". A separate section deals with the Hajj and the Holy Cities of Mecca and Medina: "The Citie of Mecca in the Arabian tongue is called Macca, that is to say, an habitation. The citie is invironed about with exceeding high and barren mountaines, and in the plaine betweene the sayde mountaines and the citie are many pleasant gardens, where groweth great abundaunce of figges, grapes, apples, and melons [...] The women of the place are courteous, iocund, and lovely, faire, with alluring eyes, being hote and libidinous, and the most of them naughtie packes [...]". - Gentle offsetting to the extremeties of the new endsheets and following leaves; minor foxing to title page. Magnificent red morocco binding from the library of the businessman and patron of the arts, (Lewis) Rodman Wanamaker (1863-1928; his armorial bookplate to front pastedown). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1105. Howgego I, H8. Weber II, 33. BM-STC 12626a. Sabin 29597. Church 322. Graesse III, 198.
 

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142 Hamdi Bey, Osman / Launay, Marie de. Les costumes populaires de la Turquie en 1873. Constantinople, imprimerie du "Levant Times & Shipping Gazette", 1873. Folio (284 x 372 mm). 3 consecutively paginated parts in one vol. 319, (1), VII, (1) pp. With 74 plates after photographs by Sébah. Contemp. giltstamped red half morocco. All edges red.
  € 25,000
First edition. - The three sections are devoted to "Turquie d'Europe" (including Greece), "Ilas ottomanes" (including Cyprus), and "Turquie d'Asie" (including Mecca and the Lebanon). The plates are based on studio portrait photographs by Pascal Sébah (1823-86), then at his peak. Sébah's Istanbul studio catered to the western European interest in the exotic "orient" and the growing numbers of tourists visiting the Muslim world who wished to take home images of the cities, ancient ruins in the surrounding area, portraits, and local people in traditional costumes. "Sebah rose to prominence because of his well-organized compositions, careful lighting, effective posing, attractive models, great attention to detail, and for the excellent print quality" (http://gary.saretzky.com/photohistory). - Occasional browning and foxing; still a good, beautifully bound copy. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 551. Blackmer 957. Lipperheide Lb 65. Colas 1374. Hiler 411.
 

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143 Hammer[-Purgstall], Joseph von. Geschichte des Osmanischen Reiches, grossentheils aus bisher unbenützten Handschriften und Archiven. Pest, C. A. Hartleben, 1827-1835. Large 8vo. 10 vols. Contemp. marbled half calf with giltstamped spine label. With 10 woodcut vignettes on half-title, 8 engr. maps, and a large plan of Constantinople (rather browned).
  € 2,800
First edition of the author's principal publication, a standard work unsurpassed to this day. Also discusses the holy cities of Mecca and Medina, which were part of the Ottoman Empire since 1517. Hammer, father of Ottoman Studies and founder of modern orientalist scholarship in Austria, was one of the 19th century's greatest specialists on the Near East. - The map belonging to vol. 7 is bound at the end of vol. 8 in error. Bindings somewhat rubbed; spines, spine-ends and corners bumped. From the library of the Royal Prussian Hussar Guard Regiment (with their stamps, giltstamped spine labels, and giltstamped shelfmark). (more)
  ¶ ADB X, 483. Brunet III, 32. Graesse III, 205. Goedeke VII, 765, 75. OCLC 6139878.
 

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The law of the Ottoman Empire
144 Hammer-Purgstall, Joseph von. Des osmanischen Reichs Staatsverfassung und Staatsverwaltung. Vienna, Camesina, 1815. 8vo. 2 vols. XLII, (2), 499, (1) pp. X, 531 (but: 532) pp. Contemp. wrappers.
  € 1,800
First edition. Encompassing account of the legal constitution, administration, and public, civil, and fiscal law of the Ottoman Empire, compiled by the great Austrian oriental scholar Joseph von Hammer-Purgstall. - Somewhat browned throughout. Untrimmed copy, somewhat rough at the edges. Bookplate of Oskar Göschen to pastedowns; last in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Goedeke VII, 760, 39. Wurzbach VII, 270 & 274.
 

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"Particularly important to lovers of falconry" (Schwerdt)
145 Hammer-Purgstall, Joseph von (ed. & transl.). Falknerklee, bestehend in drey ungedruckten Werken über die Falknerey. Aus dem Türkischen und Griechischen verdeutscht, und in Text und Übersetzung herausgegeben. (In dreyhundert Abdrücken). Pest, (A. Strauß' Wwe.) in Commission bei C. A. Hartleben, 1840. Large 8vo. Lithogr. frontispiece, (8), XXXII pp., 1 f., 115 pp., 49 ff. (Turkish text). Contemp. marbled half cloth with gilt red label to spine, with the original wrappers (depicting a falcon lithographed in white on bluish ground) bound within.
  € 2,500
Only edition, privately printed in 300 copies. Editio princeps of a "trifolium" of mediaeval works on falconry: 1. Bâz nâmeh ("Book of Falcons"). Turkish text and German translation of one of the earliest surviving texts in Ottoman Turkish, copied from a manuscript preserved in the Ambrosiana in Milan (cf. Harting, Bibliotheca Accipitraria no. 337). The most important of the three pieces contained in "Falknerklee", this work contains 155 chapters dealing with natural history and the training and care of the birds of prey. - 2. Hierakosophion ("Knowledge of the Hawk"). A shorter version of the Greek "Orneosophion" for Michael VIII Palaeologus (cf. Harting no. 330). Edited in Greek and translated from a manuscript preserved in Vienna. - 3. Emperor Maximilian, "Von der Falknerey" ("On Falconry"). First printed edition of an "Ordinance of the Emperor relative to the state of falconry in Austria" (Schwerdt), edited after the manuscript (cf. Harting no. 89). Hammer added a short-title list of 63 works on falconry in 14 languages and a glossary of technical terms in Arabic, Persian, Ottoman Turkish, Chagatai, and Greek. - Joints slightly rubbed. Some foxing as common for this work, but still a fine copy with gilt top edge (outer and lower edges uncut). (more)
  ¶ Goedeke VII, 768, 108. Harting 112. Schwerdt I, 228. Lindner 11.0809.01. pkpk
 

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146 Han, Paul Conrad Balthasar. Venediger Löwen-Muth und Türckischer Ubermuth. Nuremberg, Miltenberger f. Hoffmann, [1669]. 12mo. (8), 367 (instead of 369), (1) pp. (wanting p. 47/48). With double-page-sized frontispiece and 9 (2 folding) engr. plates. (Bound with) II: [Stiege, Ch.]. Berahtschlagung der Götter über Deutschland. Ibid., 1669. (12), 295, (1) pp. With double-page-sized engr. title page. Contemp. vellum.
  € 3,500
One of three editions published in the same year: a rare historico-geographical account of Crete, with a focus on the capture of the island by the Ottoman fleet in 1645 and the ensuing siege. Includes a view of the naval battle of the Dardanelles as well as views of Crete, Rhodes, Malta, Cyprus and Soudha. The number of plates varies from copy to copy. - Wants fol. B12. Some engravings show unsophisticated colouring. Slight paper defect to frontispiece (professionally repaired); some browning and brownstaining throughout. Bound with this is a rare German pamphlet of Baroque political satire. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ I: BM-STC H 261. Atabey 560 (note). Blackmer 538 (note). - II: Holzmann/B. VI, 2263. Not in BM-STC, Faber du Faur or Goedeke.
 

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Including a complete translation of the Quran into German
147 Happel, Eberhard Werner. Thesaurus exoticorum. Alßdann eine kurtzbündige Beschreibung von Ungarn. Hamburg & Frankfurt, Wiering & Hertel, 1688. Folio (221 x 352 mm). 5 parts in 1 vol. (10), 120, 192, 160 (but: 156), 288 (but: 388), (4), 115, (1) pp. (without 4 ff. of index). With engraved t. p., 26 double-page-sized engravings (mostly folding), 3 folding engr. maps, 3 folding woodcut plates, and numerous text engravings. Marbled pastedowns. Contemp. calf.
  € 7,500
Second edition, often referred to as the first (the extremely rare first edition proper was published in 1684). This exceptionally wide-ranging collection of politics and travel reports, anecdotes, scientific discoveries, and experiments is a testament to Happel's shrewd journalistic understanding of popular taste. The woodcuts constitute the principal work of Thomas Wiering (cf. Thieme/Becker XXXV, 537). "Has special interest for the American collector, as it consists of a series of 15 curious representations of the aborigines of America, all with detailed descriptions of their manners, customs, religion" (Sabin). Mainly concerned with the Turkish Wars in Europe (and also mentions the campaigns in southern Greece from 1684 to 1688). The last part is a complete translation of the Quran into German, edited by Johann Lange (after a Dutch translation that in turn follows du Ryer's 1647 French version). - Engraved title page shows ink censorship to pudenda of allegorical figure; four-line ms. inscription (dated 1690). Several plates trimmed closely or remargined (occasional slight loss to image). Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 39:131766W (citing 25 plates and 2 engr. maps). STC H 315. Dünnhaupt 15.1. Borba de Moraes 393. Hayn/Gotendorf III, 84. Jantz 1291. Alden 688/117. Sturminger 1464. Sabin 30279. Graesse III, 208.
 

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148 Harrison, Paul W. The Arab at Home. New York, Thomas Y. Crowell, 1924. 8vo. XII, 345, (1) pp. With frontispiece, folding map and 37 plates. Original giltstamped green cloth.
  € 500
First edition, first printing. This work, dedicated to Abdul Aziz bin Saud, one of the author's "best friends", catered to a Western public eager to learn about the Arab people and about Ibn Saud, whose military success against the Al-Rashidi and consolidation of control over the Nejd had brought him to international awareness. The following year, he would conquer the Hejaz. - Ex-library copy, rubbed and bumped, with edge defects to several plates and some damage to back cover; some brownstaining; lending card tucked into envelope on back pastedown. Ms. church library ownership to half-title. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Biobliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1134 (cites a 1923 London edition in error).
 

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149 Harrison, Paul W. The Arab at Home. New York, Thomas Y. Crowell, 1924. 8vo. XII, 345, (1) pp. With frontispiece, folding map and 37 plates. Original giltstamped green cloth.
  € 400
First edition, second printing. This work, dedicated to Abdul Aziz bin Saud, one of the author's "best friends", catered to a Western public eager to learn about the Arab people and about Ibn Saud, whose military success against the Al-Rashidi and consolidation of control over the Nejd had brought him to international awareness. The following year, he would conquer the Hejaz. - Wants front endpaper; some markings to title page, otherwise clean and tight throughout. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1134 (cites a 1923 London edition in error).
 

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150 Harrison, Paul W. The Arab at Home. London, Hutchinson & Co., [1924]. 8vo. XII, 345, (1) pp. With frontispiece, folding map and 37 plates. Original giltstamped blue cloth.
  € 400
First British edition, printed in the U.S.A. This work, dedicated to Abdul Aziz bin Saud, one of the author's "best friends", catered to a Western public eager to learn about the Arab people and about Ibn Saud, whose military success against the Al-Rashidi and consolidation of control over the Nejd had brought him to international awareness. The following year, he would conquer the Hejaz. - Foxing and brownstaining to interior. Rear hinge split. Removed from the Times Book Club, London, with their inconspicuous bookplate on rear pastedown and contemporary accession stamp (2 July 1926). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1134 (cites a 1923 London edition in error).
 

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151 Hedenborg, Johan. Turkiska nationens seder, bruk och klädedrägter. Stockholm, L. J. Hjerta, 1839. Large 4to. 216, (2) pp. With title page, portrait, map, 47 plates (46 coloured), and illustrated endpapers, all lithographed. Publisher's original cloth gilt.
  € 2,800
First and only edition. Hedenborg spent many years in Asia Minor, Egypt, and Arabia as physician to the Swedish embassy. "His costume plates are charming depictions of the residents of Constantinople, court functionaries, and street traders" (Atabey). - Endpapers and title page stamped "Trolleholms Bibliotek"; lithographed bookplate of Count Carl Trolle-Bonde (1843-1912). Last in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer (his autograph pencil ownership, dated London 1992, to pastedown). (more)
  ¶ Atabey 567. Blackmer 800. Not in Lipperheide or Colas.
 

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152 Hedenborg, Johan. Turkiska nationens seder, bruk och klädedrägter. Stockholm, L. J. Hjerta, 1839[-1842]. Large 4to. 216, (2) pp. With lithogr. portrait frontispiece, map and 47 plates (46 of which are costume lithographs in original colour). Original illustrated wrappers bound within contemp. brown cloth with giltstamped front cover illustration (spine rebacked with giltstamped label).
  € 2,200
First edition. - When Count Loevenhjelm was appointed Swedish ambassador to the Porte, the naturalist Hedenborg (1787-1865) accompanied him as his medical attendant. He published another work on Egypt and died in Rhodes. The attractive plates in this present work depict the costumes of a wide range of the inhabitants of Constantinople. The Atabey copy sold for £600 in 2002, as did the Blackmer copy several years earlier. - Binding rubbed; interior browned, showing the occasional fingerstain. Rare. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 567. Blackmer 800. Howgego II, E5 (p. 195). Göllner 40. OCLC 34458777. Not in Lipperheide, Colas or Hiler.
 

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153 Heim, Arnold. Die artesischen Quellen der Bahrein-Inseln im Persischen Golf. Basel, Emile Birkhaeuser & Cie., 1928. Large 8vo. (2), 6 pp. With a full-page map in the text. Later wrappers.
  € 150
Extract from the "Eclogae Geologicae Helvetiae" ("Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Geologischen Gesellschaft"), vol. 21. Rare study of the artesian wells found at the flat north end of the Bahrain islands, an important source of irrigation and drinking water in an area considered one of the hottest in the world. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 163079784. Not in Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula.
 

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One of the rarest pilgrimage accounts ever printed
154 Helffrich, Johann. Kurtzer und warhafftiger Bericht, von der Reis aus Venedig nach Hierusalem, von dannen in Aegypten, auff den Berg Sinai, und folgends widerumb gen Venedig. (Leipzig, Jacob Berwaldts Erben, 1578). 4to. 106 ff. With woodcut printer's device and 27 (including 25 full-page) woodcuts and 4 folding woodcut tables. Late 19th c. smoothed calf with gilt spine title.
  € 25,000
Almost unobtainable first publication of this frequently reprinted and anthologized account of a journey through the orient undertaken in 1565/66; dedicated to Elector August of Saxony. One of several variant issues, all produced at the same time and all of the utmost rarity (there is also a 146 ff. variant, VD16 ZV 7596, and one with an additional "1577" date on the title page, not recorded in VD16). - "A valuable original report" (cf. Paulitschke), hailed by Tobler as a comprehensive, reliable, and critical work. The Leipzig traveller Helffrich focuses his observations on local customs. Folios C2-D2 (day 20 through 28) describe Cyprus; the text woodcuts mainly show costumes (soldiers, nobles, veiled ladies riding into town, etc) and antiquities (Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Dome of the Rock, Sphinx). The folding plates illustrate views of the St. Catherine's Monastery, the Citadel of Cairo and the pyramids as well as an Islamic procession on horseback on the occasion of a circumcision ceremony. - Gently cleaned, retaining very insignificant browning; a few old notes to margins; contemporary caption "deß [...] Kilianß bruder" above illustration on f. X4v. Old ms. shelfmark to title page; stamp of the Rostock University Library on verso. Edge flaw in f. A2 professionally repaired. As so often, only the left part of the folding plate showing the procession is present (the edge has been repaired). Some duststaining and repairs to final leaf (with colophone and printer's device). Extremely rare: no copy in postwar auction records internationally; no copy of this issue in the America. (more)
  ¶ VD 16, H 1647 (three copies only). Tobler 78. Kainbacher 167. Leder 215. OCLC 258482939. Cf. Röhricht 739. Atabey Sale 1448 (later ed.). Weber II, 39. Gay 61. Graesse III, 234. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 296. Lipperheide Lb 9. Paulitschke 395. Boucher de la Richarderie I, 241. Not in Brunet, Cicogna, Colas, Ebert, Griep/L., Henze, Hiler, Howgego or Soranzo, not in Blackmer, Aboussouan or Wilbour Library Cat. This ed. not in Adams or BM-STC German.
 

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One of the landmarks in Arabic studies
155 Herbelot, [Barthélemi]. Bibliotheque orientale, ou dictionnaire universel, contenant généralement tout ce qui regarde la connoissance des peuples de l'Orient. Paris, Compagnie des libraires, 1697. Folio (262 x 400 mm). (32), 1059 [but: 1057], (1) pp. T. p. printed in red and black. Contemp. calf on six raised bands with giltstamped label to richly gilt spine (rubbed).
  € 1,500
First edition of this copious, variously reprinted dictionary of the culture and history of the Near East. "One of the landmarks in Arabic studies" (Hamilton 36). Continued by A. Galland after the death of Herbelot. - Somewhat brownstained; slight worming in lower margin near beginning. From the library of Ditton Park in Buckinghamshire (now Berkshire), owned by Ralph Montagu, 1st Duke of Montagu (1638-1709), with engr. bookplate on front pastedown. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 572. Fück 98. Graesse II, 376. Hoefer XXIV, 283. Zischka 15. OCLC 53777588.
 

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156 Al-Hizb as-Suyu i al-Misri. Sittun aman min nidal al-suyuiyin al-misriyin. [Cairo, Al-Hizb as-Suyu i al-Misri], 1979. 116 pp. Original wrappers. 8vo.
  € 350
Treatise on the history of the Egyptian Communist party (Al-Hizb as-Suyu i al-Misri) and other communist organizations in Egypt from 1920 to 1979. As early as October 1920, but three years after the Bolshevist October Revolution, the Egyptian Socialist Party constituted itself as the true representative of the Egyptian working class. The following year, the Party sent Hosni al-Arabi to Moscow to negotiate a possible reception into the Communist International, and in 1922, the name of the party was officially changed to "Egyptian Communist Party". After several splits, re-formations, and dissolvements, the Party was newly founded in 1975 after Anwar as-Sadat lifted the ban on the movement. - Well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 246522674.
 

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157 Hoefer, Ferdinand. Chaldée, Assyrie, Médie, Babylonie, Mésopotamie, Phénicie, Palmyrène. Paris, Firmin Didot Frères, 1852. 8vo. (4), 440 pp. With a folding map (215 x 265 mm) and 30 steel engravings. Contemp. green half morocco with giltstamped spine.
  € 450
First edition, published as vol. 51 in the series "L'Univers. Histoire et description de tous les peuples": a geographical and topographical account of the Middle East, focusing on the ancient cultural regions of Chaldea, Assyria, Media, Babylonia, Mesopotamia, Phoenicia, and Palmyra, now largely covered by Iraq and Iran and reaching from Asia Minor to the western shores of the Arabian Gulf. The plates show monuments and landmarks, specimens of cuneiform writing, engraved stones, etc. - Some foxing, but a tight, well-preserved copy. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 370244338.
 

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158 [Husayn ibn `Ali, King of Hejaz]. The King of Hedjaz and Arab Independence. With a Facsimile of the Proclamation of June 27, 1916. Together with the Proclamation issued at Baghdad by Lieut.-General Sir Stanley Maude, after the occupation of that city by the British Forces. London, Hayman, Christy & Lilly, Ltd., 1917. 8vo. 14, (2) pp. With portrait frontispiece and folding Arabic facsimile. Original printed wrappers.
  € 1,500
Rare British pamphlet advertising the independence of Hejaz from Ottoman rule, following the Arab Revolt in which T. E. Lawrence had played so vital a role. Husayn strove for acknowledgement as "King of Arabia", though the powers would recognize him only as King of Hejaz. In 1924 Abd al-Aziz ibn Saud conquered Hejaz and proclaimed the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia six years later. - Contemporary stamps of the "State Normal School, Los Angeles, California" ("with the compliments of the Over-Seas Club, Aldwych, London") on wrapper cover; interior clean. Rare, the last copy at auction sold in 1999 (Sotheby's, Oct 14, 1999, lot 439, £800). (more)
  ¶ OCLC 3949330.
 

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159 Irwin, Eyles. A Series of Adventures in the Course of a Voyage up the Red-Sea, on the Coasts of Arabia and Egypt. The third edition. London, J. Dodsley, 1787. 8vo. 2 vols. in one. XVI, 387, (1) pp. (2), 401, (1) pp. With 9 engr. plates, maps and plans (some folding). Modern library cloth with giltstamped title to spine.
  € 2,000
Third edition (first published in 1780). The East India Company servant Eyles Irwin, born in Calcutta in 1751, was appointed to survey the Black Town in 1771 and "was made superintendent of the lands belonging to Madras [...] In 1776 he became caught up in the political storm that overtook the governor of Madras, George Pigot, who was placed in confinement by members of his own council. Irwin supported Pigot, and in August he was suspended from the company's service. Early in 1777 he left India in order to seek redress in England. Irwin later published an account of his journey home, which was entitled 'A series of adventures [...]'. In this he displayed his classical education and described his experiences and observations during the journey, which lasted eleven months [...] Irwin returned to India in 1780 as a senior merchant and his route was again overland, but this time via Aleppo, Baghdad, and the Persian Gulf" (ODNB). The author recounts his imprisonment in Yanbu, Arabia, and further voyage to Jeddah, as well as his adventures in Egypt, his journeys through the Peloponnese and Balkans as well as Persia. He includes an "Ode to the Persian Gulf", which extols the beauties of Bahrain. In 1802, Irwin was to produce a musical play, "The Bedouins, or Arabs of the Desert: a Comic Opera in Three Acts" (1802), which played in Dublin for three nights. - Somewhat browned but altogether well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ Gay 66. Brunet III, 459. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1293 (2nd edition). Ibrahim-Hilmy 325 (1st and 2nd edition). Blackmer 865.
 

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Supplementing Niebuhr
160 Irwin, Eyles. Begebenheiten einer Reise auf dem rothen Meer, auf der arabischen und ägyptischen Küste, ingleichen durch die thebaische Wüste. Aus dem Englischen übersetzt. Leipzig, Weidmanns Erben und Reich, 1781. 8vo. (10), 476 pp. With 4 folding engr. plates and 3 folding engr. maps. Contemp. half vellum with blue marbled boards. All edges red.
  € 1,800
First German edition. "Irwin's report contains several additions to the observations of C. Niebuhr" (cf. Henze II, 688), and significantly more detailed maps and charts. The East India Company servant Eyles Irwin, born in Calcutta in 1751, was appointed to survey the Black Town in 1771 and "was made superintendent of the lands belonging to Madras [...] In 1776 he became caught up in the political storm that overtook the governor of Madras, George Pigot, who was placed in confinement by members of his own council. Irwin supported Pigot, and in August he was suspended from the company's service. Early in 1777 he left India in order to seek redress in England. Irwin later published an account of his journey home, which was entitled 'A series of adventures [...]'. In this he displayed his classical education and described his experiences and observations during the journey, which lasted eleven months [...] Irwin returned to India in 1780 as a senior merchant and his route was again overland, but this time via Aleppo, Baghdad, and the Persian Gulf" (ODNB). The author recounts his imprisonment in Yanbu, Arabia, and further voyage to Jeddah, as well as his adventures in Egypt, his journeys through the Peloponnese and the Balkans as well as Persia. He includes an "Ode to the Persian Gulf", in which he extols the beauties of Bahrain. In 1802, Irwin was to produce a musical play, "The Bedouins, or Arabs of the Desert: a Comic Opera in Three Acts (1802), which played in Dublin for three nights. - Translated by Johann Andreas Engelbrecht (1733-1803), commercial correspondent and average adjuster (not "J. A. E[beling]", as a contemporary owner has resolved the initials under the preface). Binding somewhat rubbed and bumped; pencil scribblings to last leaf but one. Slight brownstaining. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 865 (note). Chatzipanagioti-S. 463. Holzmann/B. II, 11272. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 326. Gay 66. Cox I, 232. Brunet III, 459. Graesse III, 430. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1293 (2nd London ed.).
 

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161 Ives, Edward. A Voyage from England to India, in the Year MDCCLIV, and an Historical Narrative or the Operations of the Squadron and Army in India, under the Command of Vice-Admiral Watson and Colonel Clive [...]. Also, a Journey from Persia to England, by an Unusual Route [...]. London, Edward & Charles Dilly, 1773. Large 4to. XII, 506 pp. With 2 folding maps and 13 plates. Modern red calf retaining original giltstamped spine label.
  € 4,500
First edition. - The British surgeon Edward Ives travelled to East India on an Admiral's ship in 1754. After working at a local hospital for a while, he returned to England in 1758. His return route through the Middle East was the same as that chosen, but a few years later, by Carsten Niebuhr: from Basra via Hille, Baghdad, Mosul, Diarbekr, Biredjik, and Haleb to Latakia. He was the first author to provide a detailed description of the ruins of Ktesiphon, previously visited by Pietro della Valle (cf. Henze). "Ives' presence at many of the transactions which he describes and his personal intimacy with Watson give his historical narrative an unusual importance, and his account of the manners and customs of the countries he visited are those of an enlightened and acute observer [...] The appendix contains an 'Account of the Diseases prevalent in Adml. Watson's squadron, a description of most of the Trees, Shrubs, and Plants of India, with their medicinal virtues'" (Cox). - Insignificant browning; a good copy. (more)
  ¶ Howgego I, P117. Wilson 107. Diba 115. Cox I, 299. Henze II, 690f. Graesse III, 439.
 

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162 Jackson, James Grey. An Account of the Empire of Marocco, and the District of Suse. London, W. Bulmer, 1809. Large 4to. XVI, 287, (1) pp. With 11 (5 folding) aquatints and 2 folding engraved maps. Modern marbled half calf, bound to style.
  € 1,500
First edition. "For sixteen years, Jackson lived in various parts of Morocco, where he tirelessly collected information on this country as well as on the interior of North Africa, including intelligence regarding commerce and trade routes to Timbuktu, and about that city" (cf. Henze). The plates show views as well as the local flora and fauna. The final addendum contains a brief list of phrases in the local dialects, including "Have you a horse?" and "camel", "dates", etc. - Slight brownstaining, but a good copy. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Abbey 296. Gay 1248. Henze II, 696. Graesse III, 441. Cf. Brunet III, 477 (3rd ed.).
 

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163 Jacob, Harold [Fenton]. Perfumes of Araby. Silhouettes of Al Yemen. London, Martin Secker, [1915]. Large 8vo. 263, (1) pp. With photoengr. frontispiece. Uncut. Publisher's beige cloth stamped in gilt and white; top edge stained blue.
  € 1,500
First edition. - Rare account of Yemen by Indian Army Lieutenant-Colonel Harold Fenton Jacob, Political Agent in Aden. - From the library of M(urray) A(lexander) M(ungo) Graham (1924-2008) with his ownership stamp (dated 3 Nov. 1965) on front pastedown. Graham, a Rhodesian-born chemical engineer for BP in Yemen, enjoyed great respect as an amateur historian of the military, naval and postal history of British Aden. - Covers very slightly soiled; corners insignificantly bumped. Minor foxing and brownstaining to first and final pages, endpapers and tissue guard toned. A good copy. The Peter Hopkirk copy, in comparable condition, fetched £805 at Sotheby's 1998 sale. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1301. OCLC 5142318.
 

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The first printing of any work by Katib Chelebi in any language
164 Katib Chelebi (Hajji Khalifah). Cronologia historica scritta in lingua Turca, Persiana, & Araba, da Hazi Halifé Mustafá, e tradotta nell'idioma Italiano da Gio. Rinaldo Carli [...]. Venice, Andrea Poletti, 1697. 4to. (8), 206 pp., final blank f. With woodcut printer's device on t. p. Contemp. vellum with ms. title to spine.
  € 9,500
First Italian edition of the "Taqwim al-Tawarikh", an annalistic chronicle from the creation of Man to the year 1648, when it was composed by the famous Turkish polymath Katib Chelebi (1609-57). This is, at the same time, the first printing of any work of Katib Chelebi's in any language: the chronicle was not published in the original mixture of Persian and Ottoman Turkish until 1733, by Müteferrika. "[T]he work originated as an excerpt of [Chelebi's previous effort,] 'Fazlakat aqwal al-ahyar', but continued up to Chelebi's own time [...] Becoming highly popular as an easy reference work, it was continued after Chelebi's death by several authors, including Hüseyin Hezarfenn, Seyhi, and Ibrahim Müteferrika, who published it as the twelfth product of his press [...] Equally popular in Europe as a reference work, it was translated into Latin, Italian, and French. Today, the afterword is the main part of interest, as it contains a brief discussion of the regularities or laws of history, and an initial elaboration of his ideas of causation in history, which are later copies by Na´ima (d. 1128/1716) in his theoretical discussion" (Kafadar, Karateke, Fleischer: Historians of the Ottoman Emprire, s.v.). - Slight worming to upper gutter; binding restored at top edge. Contemporary Italian ownership to title page. Not a single copy in auction records since 1950. (more)
  ¶ Babinger, GOW, 197. OCLC 563174142, 457543094.
 

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165 [Katib Chelebi]. Khalifeh, Mustafa ben Abdullah Haji / Mitchell, James (transl.). [Tuhfat al-kibâr fi asfâr al-Bihâr.] The History of the Maritime Wars of the Turks. Chapters I to IV. London, A. J. Valpy for the Oriental Translation Fund, 1831. Folio. XIII, (1), 80, (4) pp. Orange cloth with giltstamped spine title, boards blindstamped "Foreign Office".
  € 1,500
First English translation of Kâtib Çelebi's great work on the history of the Ottoman navy, "The Gift to the Great Ones on Naval Campaigns". Written in 1657, the book was the second to be printed at Ibrahim Müteferrika's famous Constantinople press (in 1729). It emphasises the importance of the Turkish activities in the seas and the Ottoman contribution to the navigational history, long a strangely neglected subject. Kâtib Çelebi, who is one of the outstanding names of the Ottoman world of scholarship in 17th century and one of the most prolific authors in terms of the number and types of his works during that period, was a man of knowledge, ideas and culture who was widely spoken about in the Ottoman period of the Islamic World. - Withdrawn from the Foreign Office Library with their engraved armorial bookplate and withdrawal stamp. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 29073533.
 

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166 Keane, J[ohn] F[ryer]. Six Months in Meccah: an account of the Mohammedan pilgrimage to Meccah. London, (Charles Dickens & Evands for) Tinsley Brothers, 1881. 8vo. (10), 212 pp. Original illustrated cloth.
  € 650
First edition of this report of the Hajj performed by J. F. Keane (or, Haji Mohammed Amin) during the pilgrim season of 1877/78 - one of the several 19th-century pilgrimages to Mecca performed by Westerners of which we have written accounts. - Ms. ownership of Benson Murray, NYC, on front pastedown. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1347. Howgego III, K4. Weber I, 819. Fück 197. OCLC 2698374.
 

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167 Keyzer (Keijzer), S[alomo]. De bedevaart der inlanders naar Mekka. Volledige beschrijving van alles wat op de bedevaart en de bedevaart-gangers uit Nederlandsch-Indië betrekking heeft. Nieuwe uitgaaf. Leiden, Gualtherus Kolff, 1871. (2), VI, (9)-191, (1) pp. Original gilt red cloth. With 6 chromolithographed plates. Large 8vo.
  € 2,500
One of the first scholarly investigations of Islam in the 19th-c. Dutch East Indies. The attractive plates, chromolithographed by C. W. Mieling, feature pilgrims of various nations in traditional costume as well as topographical views of holy sites. The ethnologist Salomo Keyzer (1823-68), who lectured in Islamic Law at Delft, is also known for his Dutch Qur'an translation. - Bookplate of J. C. C. C. Campagne to front pastedown. Rear hinge shows minor split; occasional insignificant staining to margins of plates; altogether well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ Landwehr, Coloured Plates, 332. Boland/Farjon 103. OCLC 64080507. KITLV 524. Not in Bastin/Brommer.
 

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168 Khan, [Gazanfar Ali]. With the Pilgrims to Mecca. The Great Pilgrimage of A.H. 1319; A.D. 1902 by Hadji Khan, M.R.A.S. (Special Correspondent of the "Morning Post") and Wilfrid Sparroy (Author of "Persian Children of the Royal Family") with an introduction by Professor A. Vambéry. London, John Lane, 1905. 8vo. 314 pp. T. p. printed in red and black. With frontispiece and 24 photo illustrations on plates. Publisher's original giltstamped and illustrated green cloth. Top edge gilt.
  € 3,500
First book edition of this detailed account of the 1902 Hajj (the greater part of the work had first appeared in the London "Morning Post"). - Brownstained throughout. Rare. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1354. OCLC 1897964.
 

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169 Khoury, H(eneine) B. Glimpses Behind the Veil. London, Sampson Low, Marston & Co., [1935]. Large 8vo. X, 342 pp. With portrait frontispiece and 62 illustrations on 23 plates. Original red cloth.
  € 150
First edition. - "The travels (c. 1934) of an Arab girl in the Near and Middle East, including a journey with her brother through Lebanon, Iran and the Persian Gulf. The author, a feminist of sorts, visits Tehran, the Caspian region, Esfahan, Persepolis, Shiraz and Bushehr. She views Reza Shah favorably, 'the roads are safe', modernization, industrial plants, etc." (Ghani). Also contains chapters on her sojourn in the "romantic pearl islands of Bahrein" (with an illustration of the author in local Bahraini costume, a gift of the ruler and his wife). - Occasional slight foxing, but well preserved. (more)
  ¶ Ghani 208. OCLC 18175528. Not in Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula.
 

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In contemporary colour
170 Kindleben, Christian Wilhelm. Galanterieen der Türken. "Frankfurt und Leipzig" [= Altona, J. H. Kaven & Comp.], 1783. 8vo. 2 parts in 1 vol. XVI, 340 pp. (3)-136 pp. With engr. frontispiece by Wentzel (counted in the pagination) and 40 folding costume plates by Endler, in original hand colour. Modern marbled boards retaining original giltstamped red spine label.
  € 4,500
First edition. - A frequently loose account of oriental conditions and excesses; "based exclusively on earlier travel publications" (cf. Chatzipanagioti-S.). The appendix of pt. 2 has a separate title: "History of a noble Turkish lady who, dressed as a man, found her fortune and death amongst weaponry in Europe". The prologue admits that this appendix "bears no connexion with the preceding matter" - indeed, it has nothing to to with Ottoman history at all, but is a satire on German conditions during the Seven Years' War, replete with allusions which would bear closer study. The author, Christian Wilhelm Kindleben (1748-85), was sometime assistant to Basedow at the Philanthropinum reform school in Dessau. - The engravings show costumes for gentlemen and ladies; "the images of the Sultana combine elements drawn from various illustrations found in Ferriol's 'Recueil'" (cf. Chatzipanagioti-S.). - Evenly browned throughout. German postwar trade records cite a single coloured copy. (more)
  ¶ Chatzipanagioti-S. 481 (= 482; citing merely 39 plates). Frauen reisen 316. Lipperheide 1419 (Lb 3). Colas 1607. Hiler 496. Hayn/Gotendorf III, 559 (and V, 111; VII, 723). Goedeke IV/1, 929, 33.
 

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171 Knolles, Richard. The generall historie of the Turkes, from the first beginning of that nation to the rising of the Ottoman familie [...]. Together with the lives and conquests of the Ottoman kings and emperours. [London], Adam Islip, 1638. Folio (235 x 335 mm). (10), 1500, (20), 31, (33) pp. Original half vellum over wooden boards. Gilt embossed red label to spine. All edges red.
  € 3,000
Fifth edition. "The great history of the Turks by Knolles (c. 1550-1610), the prose of which earned the praise of Samuel Johnson, and was later utilised by such travellers as Byron [...] The fine medallion portraits of the Turkish kings, emperors and sultans together with their (mostly) Christian adversaries, were adapted by Laurence Johnson from Jean Jacques Boissard's 'Vitae et Icones Sultanorum' (1596)" (Blackmer 919). "The recent victories of Mahomet III over the Christians must have rendered the Turkish question of vital interest to the security of Europe, and the struggle remained in the balance till the end of the seventeenth century" (Hind II, 36-38). - The first folio edition appeared in 1603. James VI of Scotland became James I of England in March of that year following the death of Elizabeth I. Knolles took advantage of the dynastic transition by dedicating the work to "the High and Mightie Prince James". Knolles' "Historie" is based heavily on a range of 16th-century printed chronicles and reports. It is, therefore, essentially a synthesis of other works, but a carefully crafted synthesis produced in English. Nothing of this scale and detail had appeared before in English on the Ottomans, and it would be another fifty years before a subsequent work in English would become the authority on the subject. Despite this fact, both Samuel Johnson and Lord Byron turned to Knolles centuries later, and both alluded to the richness of his prose style. William Shakespeare, moreover, likely used Knolles’ work (and possibly an earlier manuscript version) as a source for his 'Othello' (1603/04) (cf. Parry, 2003). - First and final leaves remargined. Two bookplates showing the arms of Lord George Macartney (1737-1806) on pastedown. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 920. ESTC S112920. STC (2nd ed.) 15055. Cf. Atabey 1076. Wing K702, R2407, R2408. V. J. Parry, Richard Knolles’ History of the Turks. Ed. Salih Ozbaran. Istanbul, The Economic and Social History Foundation of Turkey, 2003.
 

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172 La Harpe, Jean François de. Abrégé de l'histoire générale des voyages. Paris, Hotel de Thou, Laporte (vols. 22-23, and Moutardier (supplement vols.), 1780-1801. 8vo. 32 vols. With 2 engraved frontispieces and 102 engraved views and maps (27 folding). Contemporary mottled calf, gold-tooled spines, marbled edges and endpapers.
  € 8,500
First edition of a splendid collection of voyages, based on Prévost's "Histoire générale des voyages", and illustrated with remarkably evocative plates. The work contains the most important voyages to Africa, Asia, America and the Pacific from the earliest Portuguese explorers to the 18th century, extensively commenting on the culture, natural history, customs and languages of the various regions. The sections on Arabia include a large map of the Arabian Gulf (67 x 52 cm) and an illustration of a sacred camel from Mecca. - Spines have manuscript library labels; the bindings show some light wear. In very good condition overall. (more)
  ¶ Beddie 10. Forbes 14. Hage Chahine 2566. Hill 964. Sabin 38632. Graesse IV, 79. OCLC 2410433.
 

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173 La Mottraye, Aubry de. Voyages en Europe, Asie & Afrique. Den Haag, Johnson & van Duren, 1727. Folio (200 x 315 mm). 2 vols. (14), 472, 23 pp. (6), 496, 39 pp. With 2 engr. frontispieces, 2 engr. title vignettes, 47 engr. plates (some folding) after Hogarth, Picard and others, and 4 folding engr. maps. Modern half calf.
  € 4,500
First edition in French. "This important work describes La Mottraye’s travels over a 26-year period which took him through Northern Europe to Tartary and the Levant. The plates are of particular interest and include many signed by Hogarth which form part of his early work. They illustrate antiquities, objets d’art, and scenes of the eastern life. Especially interesting is a plate showing a dance at a Greek wedding, with each member of the party dressed in a different costume" (Blackmer). Chapter XII of vol. 1 discusses the Quran, and the Appendix contains extracts from a manuscript on the Muslim faith as well as a section on the Islamic calendar. "Aubry de la Mottraye, a Huguenot, travelled extensively throughout Europe, Asia and Africa during the years 1696 to 1729, beginning in Scandinavia, where he became a confidant of Charles XII. He then went on to Tartary and the Levant. The work contains several notable costume plates, particularly relating to the Levant, some of which may have been inspired by Ferriol and Le Hay's 'Recueil de cent estamped représentant différentes nations du Levant' (1714)" (Atabey). - Occasional edge defects, repaired. Slight brownstaining. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 946. Weber II, 443. Röhricht (Palästina), p. 287. Tobler 116. Chatzipanagioti-S. 504. Hage Chahine 2602. Lipperheide Cl 6. Graesse IV, 90.
 

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First edition, perfectly preserved
174 Laborde, Léon [Emmanuel Simon Joseph] de. Voyage de l'Arabie Pétrée. Paris, Giard, 1830. Imperial folio (420 x 585 mm). 2 vols. bound in one. (8), 87, (1) pp. With large lithographed title vignette and coat of arms of Wilhelm II on dedication leaf. 69 lithographed plates, maps and plans after Laborde and Linant de Bellefonds, mostly mounted on India paper (3 of which folding or double-page and 1 coloured). Half calf, marbled boards and endpapers. Spine with six raised bands and gilt title.
  € 40,000
First edition of "an important work" (Blackmer), complete with all the magnificent views in large folio format. All subsequent editions, including the English one, were published in octavo and retained only a few plates of the original edition, all in considerably reduced format. Laborde made the journey to Petra with the engineer Linant de Bellefonds in 1828, travelling from Suez via St. Catherine's and through Wadi al-Araba to Akabah. Although Burckhardt, Irby and Mangles had explored Petra before Laborde, he was the first to make detailed drawings of the area. - Occasional slight foxing to margins and India backing paper; plates in excellent condition. A fine, clean copy of the original edition, dedicated to the Elector Wilhelm II of Hesse (1777-1847). Rare: the last complete copy came up for auction in 2009 (Christie's, 3 June, lot 120: £23,750). (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 929. Gay 929. Henze III, 101. Brunet III, 714. Vicaire IV, 758f. Not in Atabey. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1386 (2nd ed. only). Howgego 335, L2 (ed. 1830-33).
 

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175 Lacroix, A[uguste] de. Storia privata e politica d' Abd-el-Kader. Bologna, Giuseppe Tiocchi, 1846. 8vo. 277, (3) pp. With engr. portrait and folding lithogr. manuscript facsimile. Contemp. marbled green half cloth with giltstamped spine title.
  € 950
Early study of the Algerian rebel Abd el-Qadir, the Emir of Mascara (1807-83), published at the height of his insurrection against the French invaders. On 21 December 1847, after being denied refuge in Morocco because of French diplomatic and military pressure on its leaders, `Abd al-Qadir surrendered to General Louis de Lamoricière in exchange for the promise that he would be allowed to go to Alexandria or Acre. Two days later, his surrender was made official to the French Governor-General of Algeria, Henri d'Orléans, duc d'Aumale. The French government refused to honour Lamoricière's promise and `Abd Al-Qadir was exiled to France. - Binding rubbed; some brownstaining to interior. Rare. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 48656095.
 

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176 Lafitau, Joseph-François, SJ. Histoire des decouvertes et conquestes des Portugais dans le nouveau monde. Paris, Saugrain & Coignard, 1734. 4to. 4 vols. With folding frontispiece, large folding map of the world, and 14 folding plates. Uniform contemp. full calf, spines with raised bands and richly gilt decorated. All edges sprinkled in red.
  € 2,800
Second edition of this famous work, first published the previous year and devoted to the Portuguese conquests in both hemispheres (concentrating on Africa and Asia). The frontispiece (bound after p. 2 in this set) shows a view of the Indian fleet at anchor in Lisbon. The world map shows the voyages of Vasco da Gama, Cabral and Magellan. Apart from portraits of the Portuguese conquistadors, the plates show views of Aden, Hormuz, Cochin, Goa, Chaul, Bassein, Mozambique, Malacca, etc. Vol. IV in particular deals with the "côté de l'Arabie & de la Perse", the "Princes Arabes" and the Arabian Gulf ("tout le Golphe Persique"), as well as "l'Isle de Baharen" (Bahrain), which the King of Hormuz sought to keep in his possession, and the 1559 Turkish siege of the island. Vol. III mentions Prince Abdullah's retreat to Mecca, while vol. II describes pearl-fishing in the Arabian Gulf and the Portuguese conquest of Al-Qatif and Bahrain. There is also a mention of the beautiful Arabian horse presented to the Viceroy of Goa by the King of Hormuz, much desired by the Idalcan. "An esteemed and well-written work" (Sabin). - Spine-ends chipped, corners slightly bumped; insignificant browning due to paper; generally a fine, well-preserved copy from the library of the historian Gabriel Cottreau with his bookplate on pastedowns. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1388. Cf. de Backer/Sommervogel IV, 1363 (1st ed.). Cox II, 513. Borba de Moraes I, 386. Brunet III, 1745. Sabin 38592. pkpk
 

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177 Lammens, Henri, SJ. L'Arabie occidentale avant l'Hegire. Beirut, Imprimerie Catholique, 1928. 4to. (4), 343, (1) pp. Original printed wrappers.
  € 500
First edition. - The French monk Henri Lammens (1862-1937) spent most of his life in Lebanon. He lectured in Islamic history at the Jesuit University of Beirut and was editor of the journal "al-Machreq". Here, Lammens discusses the situation of Christians and Jews in Mecca before the advent of Islam, the military organisation in Mecca, Arabic religious ceremonies, the border between Syria and Hijaz, etc. - Slight edge and spine defects. Ownership note "Shaffer" on t. p. Untrimmed, partly uncut copy. (more)
  ¶ Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1401.
 

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178 Lammens, Henri, SJ. La Mecque a la veille de l'Hégire. Beirut, Imprimerie Catholique, 1924. 4to. (3), 100-437, (3) pp. With a folding table. Original printed wrappers.
  € 500
Extract from the "Mélanges de l'Université Saint-Joseph" in Beirut, tome IX, fasc. 4. - The French monk Henri Lammens (1862-1937) spent most of his life in Lebanon. He lectured in Islamic history at the Jesuit University of Beirut and was editor of the journal "al-Machreq". - From the library of the U.S. archaeologist and diplomat Easton T. Kelsey, signed and dated "Beirut, Syria, July 1936" on the flyleaf. (more)
  ¶ Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1408.
 

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179 Laporte, [Joseph] de. Le Voyageur François, ou La Connoissance de l'Ancien et du Nouveau Monde. Quatrième édition. Tome II. Paris, L. Cellot, 1771. 8vo. 498, 2 pp. Contemp. calf with giltstamped label to richly gilt spine. All edges red. marbled endpapers.
  € 450
This volume of Joseph de Laporte's epistolary travel report treats Turkey, the Caucasus, Armenia as well as Persia, the Arabian Peninsula, and Palestine. - Clean copy in French chateaux binding. Engraved heraldic bookplate of the Chateau de Louppy on front pastedown. (more)
  ¶ Brunet III, 836. Graesse IV, 106. OCLC 630393174.
 

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180 Laporte, [Joseph] de. Le Voyageur François, ou La Connoissance de l'Ancien et du Nouveau Monde. Tome III. Paris, Vincent, 1766. Large 12mo. (4), 545, (1) pp. Contemp. full calf with two giltstamped labels to gilt spine. Marbled endpapers. All edges red.
  € 500
The only volume of Joseph de Laporte's epistolary travel report to deal with Ormuz, "le golfe Arabique", "la Mecque", Socotra, Qeshm Island, and Portugeuese India. - Slight traces of worming to lower cover, but a good, appealingly-bound copy. (more)
  ¶ Brunet III, 836. Graesse IV, 106. OCLC 833064851.
 

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181 Lawrence, T(homas) E(dward). The Home Letters of T. E. Lawrence and his Brothers. Oxford, Basil Blackwell, 1954. 8vo. XVI, 730, (2) pp. With a frontispiece and 44 plate illustrations. Publisher's original blue cloth with giltstamped spine; dust jacket slightly chipped.
  € 500
First edition. - The letters of T. E. Lawrence, along with those of his brothers Will (William George) and Frank (Helier), both of whom fell in 1915 on the western front, writtten home to their family and here edited by the eldest brother, the physician Montagu Robert Lawrence (1885-1971). Thomas Edward's letters contain extensive accounts of his wartime operations in the Middle East. - A few pencil marginalia, otherwise a good copy. From the collection of Richard Border, Pulborough, with his autogr. ownership (dated 8 July 1954) on flyleaf. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 3690672.
 

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182 [Lawrence, Thomas Edward]. Harry Pirie-Gordon (ed.). A Brief Record of the Advance of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force under the Command General Sir Edmund H.H. Allenby. July 1917 to October 1918. Compiled from Official Sources and Published by the Palestine News. Cairo, Government Press and Survey of Egypt, 1919. Small folio (234 x 300 mm). (6), 113, (1) pp. With Allenby's portrait frontispiece, 56 coloured maps and facing explanatory texts printed on versos. Contemporary Jerusalem olive wood boards with bevelled edges and giltstamped calf spine.
  € 2,500
First edition, edited by Harry Pirie-Gordon as a souvenir album: an account of the 1917-19 campaign in the Middle East. Contains two reports written by T. E. Lawrence: "Sherifian Co-Operation in September" and "Story of the Arab Movement", in which he details the Ashraf contribution to the War effort and narrates his own involvement in a third-person report. A near-flawless copy, beautifully bound in boards of polished olive wood with the Cross of Jerusalem engraved on the upper cover and the word "Jerusalem" calligraphically painted on the lower one. Includes a printed "Programme of the Passion-Week Ceremonies Which Will be Held at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre" (April 12-20, 1919) with pencilled annotations. (more)
  ¶ O'Brien A011.
 

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183 Leachman, Gerard Evelyn. A Journey in the North-Eastern Arabia. [London, The Royal Geographic Society, 1911]. 256-274 pp., folding map. Blue printed wrappers. 8vo.
  € 250
Captain Leachman's account of a three months' journey in North-Eastern Arabia was published in the "Journal of the Royal Geographic Society". During his journey through today's Saudi Arabia and Iraq he he was involved in a battle between the Anaiza and Shammar tribes near Hail. The map of north-east Arabia shows the routes of Leachman and other explorers. - In good condition throughout. (more)
 

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184 Le Chatelier, Alfred. Les Confréries musulmanes du Hedjaz. Paris, Ernest Leroux, 1887. 12mo. IX, 310 pp. Contemp. cloth.
  € 500
Comprehensive treatise by the French officer and orientalist Alfred le Chatelier (1855-1929) about the various Muslim brotherhoods in the Hejaz, discussing the origins, history, myths, and organisations of local religious orders such as the Kadriya, Khelouatiya, Chadeliya, Aissaoua, Taibiya, Derqaoua, Nakechabendiya, Badaouiya, Beioumiya, Doussouiya, Tidjaniya, Refaiya, Saadiya, Emirghaniya, Seddikiya, Allouaniya, Melamiya, and Senoussiya. (more)
  ¶ Cf. Fück 254 (A. Le Chatelier).
 

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185 Lechevalier, [Jean Baptiste]. Voyage de la Propontide et du Pont-Euxin. Paris, Dentu, 1800-1802. 8vo. 2 vols. XII, 168 pp. (4), (169)-416 pp. With 6 folding engr. maps. Contemp. marbled calf with gilt cover borders and double labels to gilt spines. Marbled endpapers.
  € 3,500
Variant issue of the first edition, probably the second issue altogether. "Le Chevalier had assisted Choiseul-Gouffier in his 'Voyage pittoresque de la Grèce', and was then sent to Jassy to observe Russian troop movements. His work is an account of a journey round the shores of the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea" (Atabey). While Chatzipanagioti-S. differentiates between the first and the second edition, the present variant is not described: the verso of the half-title of vol. 1 shows only the "avis au relieur"; p. 168: "Fin du tome premier"; p. 169 (beginning of text in vol. 2) is unpaginated. Thus, this apparently constitutes the second issue of the first editon. - Lechevalier stood in the service of Choiseul-Gouffier; from 1787 onwards he accompanied Alexander Ipsilanti on a tour of the Mediterranean which lasted several months. The maps show the Sea of Marmara, the Dardanelles, the Black Sea, the Bosporus, Constantinople, and Brussa. - Both title pages have contemporary ownership stamps ("S" with princely crown); a few minor tears to maps have been professionally repaired; some staining to title page of vol. 2. A prettily bound copy, formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 995. Weber II, 649. Atabey 697. Graesse IV, 137. Cf. Chatzipanagioti-S. 538f.
 

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186 [Libya - Barbary Wars.] Ray, William. Horrors of Slavery: or, The American Tars in Tripoli. Troy, Oliver Lyon, 1808. 8vo. 298 pp. Contemp. full calf with sparsely gilt spine and giltstamped red spine label.
  € 2,800
Rare original edition of this slavery narrative by an American naval officer captured by Tripolitanian forces during the First Barbary War. Contains "an account of the loss and capture of the United States frigate Philadelphia; treatment and sufferings of the prisoners; description of the place; manners, customs, &c. of the Tripolitans; public transactions of the United States with that regency, including Gen. Eaton's expedition; interspersed with interesting remarks, anecdotes, and poetry, on various subjects. Written during upwards of nineteen months' imprisonment and vassalage among the Turks" (subtitle). - In 1801, Yusuf Karamanli, Pasha of Tripolitania, had demanded from Thomas Jefferson a radical increase in the tribute which the U.S. government had paid since 1796 for the protection of U.S. commerce from piracy by Ottoman tribes along the North African coast. Jefferson, confident in the ability of the new U.S. Navy to protect American shipping, refused the demands, leading the Pasha to unofficially declare war by chopping down the flagpole before the American consulate. A U.S. naval force blockaded Tripoli in 1803. On October 31 the frigate USS Philadelphia ran aground on an uncharted reef near the harbor and was captured and its entire crew imprisoned by Tripolitan forces. Stephen Decatur carried out a daring commando operation, sailing for Tripoli with eighty volunteers, boarding the berthed Philadelphia and setting it ablaze, thus denying its use to the corsairs. In the ensuing First Barbary War, the Pasha soon found himself threatened with invasion by American ground forces and the reinstatement of his deposed brother, Hamet Karamanli, recruited by the U.S. officer William Eaton. He signed a treaty ending the war on 10 June 1805, resulting in the repatriation of 300 U.S. sailors. It was the first time the U.S. flag had been raised in victory on foreign soil. - Strong browning throughout; some loss to p. 99f. Possibly the first published account of a U.S. encounter with the Muslim world. Very rare; no copy recorded at auction for the last decades. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 2759833. pkpk
 

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187 Lippens, Philippe. Expédition en Arabe centrale. Paris, Librairie d'Amérique et d'Orient Adrien Maisonneuve, 1956. Large 8vo. (2), XI, (1), 214, (2) pp. With 39 black-and-white photo illustrations on plates, 4 colour photo plates, and 1 folding colour map. Illustrated colour wrappers.
  € 1,500
The Belgian scholar and air force captain Count Philippe Auguste Hubert Lippens (1910-89) participated in UN missions to Palestine and was among the discoverers of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1949. He was the third man (and the second European) to enter the first cave of Qumran, then in Transjordan. He undertook an archaeological expedition to central Arabia in 1951 and to the Qumran site in 1953. Among his travel companions was Harry St. John Bridger Philby, who contributed the preface to this memoir. - Untrimmed, uncut copy. (more)
  ¶ pkpk
 

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188 Lithgow, William. Nineteen Years Travels through the most Eminent Places in the Habitable World. London, for John Wright & Thomas Passinger, 1682. (8), 481, (7) pp. With woodcut frontispiece and 6 woodcut plates, all folding. Later brown sheepskin with giltstamped red spine label. Marbled endpapers. 8vo.
  € 3,500
Somewhat later edition of this famous work that saw twelve editions by 1814, originally published under the title "The total discourse, of the rare adventures, and painefull peregrinations of long nineteene years travayles, from Scotland to the most famous kingdomes in Europe, Asia, and Affrica" in 1632; a first draft had appeared in 1614. No copy of this 1682 edition at auction in 35 years. - Lithgow, a Scot, travelled extensively throughout the Levant in three journeys between 1610 and 1622, visiting Greece, Constantinople and the Eastern Mediterranean from 1610-13; North Africa and Italy from 1614-19; and Spain from 1619-21. "He travelled mostly on foot and had a greater knowledge of the interior of the countries he visited than most travellers of this period. He provides interesting details of the society, men, and manners he observed" (Blackmer). Lithgow's work is "probably the earliest authority for coffee-drinking in Europe, Turkish baths, a pigeon post between Aleppo and Bagdad, the long Turkish tobacco-pipes, artificial incubation, and the importation (since about 1550) of currants from Zante to England" (DNB). - Frontispiece laid down. Several minor defects to paper, pre-dating the printing process, to fols. G2, Aa1, Ee3, and Hh5 (hence slight loss to individual letters). Trimmed rather closely, with some headlines shaved. Generally a nice, clean copy. (more)
  ¶ Wing L2541. DNB 33, 361. OCLC 12646376. ESTC (RLIN) R028791. Cf. Blackmer 1021 (1640 second ed. only). Not in Howgego.
 

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An exhortation to fight the Turks, published in 1497
189 Locher, Johann Georg. Libro philomusi, Panegyrici ad Rege[m] Tragedia[m] de Thurcis et Suldano Dyalog[us] de heresiarchis. Strasbourg, Johann (Reinhard) Grüninger, [not before 15 May] 1497. 4to. 62 ff. 30-33 lines and heading line (Roman type 17:145G, 22:89G); several woodcut Greek interspersions (K6v & I3r). With full-page woodcut on reverse of title page, additional full-page woodcut on f. Jiv, and 17 half-page woodcuts in the text (with some repeats). Mid-18th-century boards using an 18th-century antiphonary.
  € 15,000
First edition of the author's first important work, an exhortation to fight the Turks, couched as a Latin tragedy. Jakob Locher (1471-1528) had been created poet laureate but months before. The volume is concluded by a "Dyalogus" against all forms of heresy (and including encomia and dedicatory addresses to the Emperor and the nobles of court and clergy). - Contains fine woodcuts, some of which were used previously in the Strasbourg editions of Terence and the Ship of Fools; at least six blocks were cut originally for this book. "The opening woodcut depicts the author and newly crowned poet laureate" (cf. von Arnim). This is the earlier impression without the armorial woodcut on fol. B6r (as in Schramm); the final line of fol. J3r still reads "tekos" (for "telos"). Typographical errors "Jacboi" on fol. L2r; "Daum" (for "Datum") in final line of fol. L3r; colophone reads "anno christo". A pinhead-sized wormhole throughout the blank margin (not touching text). Top edge trimmed rather closely in places; a few underlinings by a contemporary hand. Altogether a fine, very clean copy. Extremely rare; last seen in the trade more than a decade ago (Shipperdson-Field-Nakles copy, Christie's New York, 17 April 2000, lot 22: $15,275). (more)
  ¶ HC 10153*. Goff L-264. GW M18631. BMC I, 112. BSB-Ink L-206. Schreiber 4513. Grüninger 32. Schramm XX, 23. Slg. Schäfer 212. Goedeke I, 427, 9.
 

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190 Lotti, Lotto. Ch' n' ha Cervel hapa gamb. O sia la liberatione di Vienna assediata dall' armi Ottomane. Poemetto giocoso. In lingua popolare Bolognese consecrato. Parma, heredi di [Mario] Vigna, 1685. 8vo. (16), 121, (3) pp. With engr. frontispiece and 5 engr. plates by Giovanni Giuseppe Cosattini. Contemp. Italian vellum.
  € 1,500
First edition of Lotto Lotti's (1667-1714) poem celebrating the liberation of Vienna from the 1683 Turkish siege, written in the Bologna dialect. "Divided in 5 cantos of 30 to 40 eight-line verses each" (Kábdebo). Among thre pretty engravings are scenes of battle and siege. - Somewhat browned and (finger-)stained throughout; worming to blank margin near beginning; vellum on lower board and spine-end restored professionally. (more)
  ¶ Sturminger 1971. Kábdebo II, 290. British Library (17th c. Italian books) I, 503. ICCU VEAE\001923. Graesse IV, 264.
 

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191 Lotti, Lotto. [Ch' n' ha Cervell ava gamb.] La liberazione di Vienna assediata dalle armi Ottomane. Poemetto giocoso. E la Banzuola. Dialoghi sei. In lingua popolare Bolognese. [Prob. Bologna, c. 1746]. 8vo. (8), 248 pp. With engr. frontispiece and 12 full-page engravings by G. M. Cantarelli. Contemp. blue wrappers.
  € 950
Third edition (probably printed in Bologna) of Lotto Lotti's (1667-1714) poem celebrating the liberation of Vienna from the 1683 Turkish siege, written in the Bologna dialect and first published in Parma in 1685. "Divided in 5 cantos of 30 to 40 eight-line verses each" (Kábdebo). Pretty engravings; the one facing the first canto (a besieging army aiming their cannons) shows contemporary touches of blue colour in places. Includes Lotti's collection of dialogues, "La Banzuola" (likewise illustrated throughout). - Date taken from the engraving on fol. O5v. Untrimmed copy. (more)
  ¶ Sturminger 1973. NUC (pre-1956) vol. 342, p. 194. ICCU UBOE\075844, VEAE\001888. Graesse IV, 264. Cf. Kábdebo II, 290.
 

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192 Low, Charles Rathbone. History of the Indian Navy (1613-1863). London, Richard Bentley, 1877. 8vo. 2 vols. XX, 542 pp. VI, 596 pp. Original blue cloth, title gilt to spines, blind panelling to the boards, pale yellow surface-paper endpapers. Neatly rebacked with the original spines laid down.
  € 2,500
First edition, uncommon in the cloth. Forms the basis for studies of campaigns and exploration wherever the Bombay Marine operated: in the Red Sea, the Persian Gulf, the Arabian Sea, the Laccadives, Maldives and west coast of India, the Andamans, Java and Burma. Of primary importance as a record of the history of the British presence in the Gulf, where the Bombay Marine served as police force, mail carrier, ethnographer, surveyor and, when necessary, strike force for over three centuries - in particular in the period when British relations with the Gulf sheikhdoms were being consolidated. Includes detailed accounts of hydrographic surveys by the Indian Navy, including those in the Persian Gulf. Never surpassed as a history of the maritime arm of India's foreign policy. - Engraved bookplates of the Royal Artillery Library, Woolwich, to the front pastedowns with manuscript annotations of their receipt in April 1878; small paper press-mark labels above. Extremeties slightly rubbed, light browning, but overall a very good set. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1492. NMM V, 2273.
 

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193 Lucas, Paul. Voyage [...], fait en M.DCCXIV, &c. par ordre de Louis XIV. dans la Turquie, l'Asie, Sourie, Paléstine, Haute et Basse Égypte, &c. Amsterdam, Steenhouwer & Uytwers, 1720. 12mo. 2 vols. (20), 436, (8) pp. (2), 345, (26) pp. Title pages printed in red and black. With 32 engr. plates, some folding, and 2 folding engr. maps. Contemp. full calf, cover blindstamped and gilt, spine and leading edges gilt, inner dentelle gilt. Marbled edges and endpapers.
  € 2,500
Second edition (first published in 1719). "Paul Lucas (1664-1737), merchant, naturalist, doctor and antiquary, made many visits to various parts of the Levant following his service with the Venetians at Negroponte in 1688. [...] This work describes Lucas's third voyage of 1714 to 1717 during which he visited Constantinople, Syria, Palestine and Egypt, and also includes a list of the antiquities discovered" (Blackmer). Edited and co-written by Antoine Banier. The plates show Tyre, Damascus, the Great Pyramid and numerous other antiquties, flora and fauna; the maps show Asia Minor and the Nile Delta. "Many commentators have criticised Lucas for the often fabulous nature of his accounts, but his writings convey a vivd sense of the nature of the East, laced with considerable classical erudition" (ibid.). - Occasional insignificant browning. A fine copy from the library of Henry Blackmer with his bookplate on the pastedowns; latterly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 734. Blackmer 1038 (this copy). Weber II, 472. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 394. Gay 2122. Röhricht 2145. Tobler 122. Henze III, 289. Chatzipanagioti-S. 569. Paulitschke 663 (note). OCLC 832706737. Cf. Aboussouan 579 (1719 Rouen ed.).
 

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194 Lusignan, [Sauveur?]. A history of the revolt of Ali Bey, against the Ottoman Porte, including an account of the form of government of Egypt; together with a description of Grand Cairo, and of several places in Egypt, Palestine, and Syria: to which are added, a short account of the present state of the Christians who are subjects to the Turkish government, and the journal of a gentleman who travelled from Aleppo to Bassora. By S. L. London, James Phillips for the author, 1783. 8vo. (12), 259, (3) pp. Untrimmed in the original boards, paper spine lettered in ink.
  € 4,800
First edition, scarce. An important account of the revolt of ‘Ali Bey, the shaykh al-balad of Egypt who declared the country independent of the Ottoman Empire before proceeding to seize control of the Hijaz and invade Syria. "Very little is known of Lusignan, who claims to have known Ali Bey personally. He seems to have been a Greek or more probably a Cypriot who took refuge in London; he advertises himself as a teacher of ancient and modern Greek (on A5v), but there is no mention of him in Legrand. Perhaps he is connected with the Giacomo Lusignan who later acted as a fac-totum for the Earl of Guildford" (Blackmer). - Binding rubbed and a little bumped. Contemporary ownership "F. F." on title page. An excellent, wide-margined copy. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 1041. ESTC T130751 (erroneously calling for a map, which only appeared in the second edition). Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 396. Röhricht 1448.
 

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The only complete copy on the market for decades
195 Luynes, Honoré d'Albert de. Voyage d'exploration à la mer Morte, à Petra et sur la rive gauche du Jourdain. Oeuvre posthume. Paris, Arthus Bertrand, [1874]. 3 vols. and 1 vol of plates. (2), II ff., 388 pp. (6), 222, (6) pp. (4), VI, 326 pp. With 14 lithogr. plates (4 in colour). Printed original wrappers. Folio (390 x 295 mm). Atlas: (4) pp., 85 plates (some double-page-sized), including 65 photogravures by Charles Nègre after Louis Vignes. Original half cloth portfolio. Ties.
  € 38,000
First edition, very rarely encountered complete: only 2 copies sold at international auctions of the past decades (both incomplete; the last set wanting plate 44: Sotheby's, 15 Oct. 2003, lot 676, GBP 8500; only 40 plates from the set, including glass and collodium negatives, fetched 21,450 EUR at Sotheby's Paris [22 March 2003, lot 583]). - Rare travel report describing the scientific expedition to Palestine undertaken by the French archaeologist de Luynes (1802-67) in 1864. - The work is sought for its splendid illustrations based on photos by Henri Sauvaire and the Naval Lieutenant Louis Vignes. Vol. 1 contains the Duke's travel diary; vol. 2 contains the reports "De Petra à Palmyre" by L. Vignes and "Voyage de Jérusalem, à Karak et à Chaubak" by Mauss and Sauvaire; vol. 3 contains the "Géologie" by L. Lartet (with its own set of plates at the end). The atlas is divided into two parts with a total of 85 plates (thus complete): 67 plates pertain to the Duke's report (3 unnumbered and 64 numbered: 1 map and 1 itinerary in colours, 1 engr. double plate, and 64 photogravures by Charles Nègre after photos by Vignes (views of sites, towns, ruins, etc.); Mauss's report is illustrated by 18 numbered plates: 1 double-page-sized itinerary, 3 plans (2 in colour), and 14 lithogr. plates by Cicéri after photos by Vignes and Sauvaire (views of Karak, Zat-Raz, etc.). - Occasional slight foxing (esp. in vol. 3); plates clean and spotless throughout. A fine, complete set in the original printed wrappers as issued; text vols. are uncut and wide-margined. (more)
  ¶ Röhricht (Bibl. Pal.) 515f., no. 2824. Röhricht (Pilgerreisen) 637, no. 872. Henze III, 312. Parr/Badger, The Photobook I, 33.
 

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196 Lyon, George Francis. A Narrative of Travels in Northern Africa, in the Years 1818, 19, and 20. Accompanied by Geographical Notices of Sudan, and of the Course of the Niger. London, John Murray, 1821. 4to. XII, 383, (1) pp. Folding engr. map frontispiece ("Map of a Route through the Regency of Tripoli and Kingdom of Fezzan"), 17 chromolithogr. plates drawn by Lyon and lithographed on stone by G. Harley or D. Dighton, M. Gauci, as well as a text illustration. Modern red cloth with gilt-stamped black spine labels.
  € 4,500
First edition of Lyon's account of his botched Timbuktu expedition, finely illustrated with 17 plates (created by M. Gauci and D. Dighton after Lyon's own drawings) showing the Arabian desert culture. - In 1818, G. F. Lyon (1795-1832) was sent with surgeon-explorer Joseph Ritchie by Sir John Barrow to find the course of the Niger River and the location of Timbuktu. A year later they had only got as far as Murzouk where they both fell ill. Ritchie never recovered and died, but Lyon survived and continued his travels. After a year he returned to Tripoli, the expedition having failed utterly. Upon return, he was promoted and in 1821 - the same year this book was published - given the command of HMS Hecla on his second attempt. Lyon was reputed to have a genuine informed interest in the culture and inhabitants of the lands he visited. Wearing Arab/Muslim dress and speaking fluent Arabic, he managed to blend in with the inhabitants of North Africa. "An important work. Lyon joined the British government scientific mission headed by Ritchie, taking place of Captain Frederick Marryat. They met at Tripoli in November 1818. Ritchie died in 1819 and Lyon took over command of the expedition. He returned to London in July, 1820. Shortly after that he joined Parry's arctic expedition. The fine plates illustrate mostly costumes, and are all after drawings by Lyon" (Blackmer). Fergus Fleming characterizes the relationship between Ritchie and Lyon, who was a "moustachioed extrovert aged twenty-two [...] Lyon was not, on the face of it, suited to African exploration". By his own confession, his main interests were "balls, riding, dining & making a fool of myself". - The plates include: Costume of Tripoli (2 types), Triumphal Arch - Tripoli, Arabs Exercising, The Castle of Bonjem, A Sand Wind on the Desert, Piper and Dancer - Tripoli, The Castle of Morzouk, Tuarick in a Shirt of Leather & Tuarick of Aghades, Tuaricks of Ghraat, Costume of Soudan, Negresses of Soudan, Tibboo Woman in Full Dress, Tibboo of Gatrone, A Tuarick on his Maherrie, camel Conveying a Bride to her husband, A Slave Kaffle. - Offsetting on title from map; map tears repaired. Altogether in very good condition. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 1044. Abbey Travel 304. Howgego II, L52 (p. 376). Henze III, 318. Lipperheide Ma 14 (note). Colas 1920. Hiler 556. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 397. Lambert I, 147. Tooley 311. Fergus Fleming, Barrow's Boys: A Stirring Story of Daring, 2001, pp. 956. Brunet III, 1254. Graesse IV, 312.
 

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197 Malcolm, John. The History of Persia. From the Most Early Period to the Present Time. London, James Moyes for John Murray and Longman & Co., 1815. Small folio. 2 vols. XII, (2), 644 pp. With folding engr. map and 11 plates. VII, (1), 715, (1) pp. With 11 plates. Contemp. full calf with gitstamped spine label.
  € 5,000
First edition of this "ouvrage importante" (Brunet), based on Malcolm's (1769-1833) three diplomatic visits to Persia. While the history it provides extends back to the earliest kings known at the time, the most valuable contribution made by this book is its detailed description of the contemporary Qajar dynasty from its outset. Complete with 24 copper engravings on 23 plates including the large folding map of Persia as well as several portraits and views. Occasional foxing to margins; contemporary ownership to title page. Bindings a little rubbed, with slight weakening to hinges. A good, wide-margined copy. (more)
  ¶ Howgego II, M7. Ghani 236-239. Wilson 134. Brunet III, 1333. Graesse IV, 350. Schwab 360. Sotheby's, Hopkirk sale, 963. Sotheby's, Burrell sale, 496. OCLC 19941897.
 

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198 Maltzan, Heinrich von. Meine Wallfahrt nach Mekka. Reise in der Küstengegend und im Innern von Hedschas. Leipzig, Dyk, 1865. 8vo. 2 vols in one. VI, 377, (1) pp. (2), 373, (1) pp. Half calf with giltstamped spine title.
  € 3,500
First edition, rare. Maltzan, an "oriental traveller of the highest order" (cf. Henze), visited Arabia in 1860 disguised as an Arab. He was one of the first westerners to see Mecca and, upon being discovered, flew the country via Jeddah. - Title and preface stamped; otherwise well preserved. From the collection of the Polish scholar Jan Nargielewicz (1816-86). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula 1522. Howgego III, M21. Fück 197. Henze III, 361. NYPL Arabia coll. 170.
 

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199 Mandelslo, Johann Albrecht von. Morgenländische Reyse-Beschreibung. Hamburg, Christian Guth (printed by Johan Holwein, Schleswig), 1658. Folio. (32), 248, (36) pp. With engraved frontispiece by Christian Rothgiesser, full-page engraved author's portrait, double-page engraved map, and 21 large engravings in text, mostly signed by Rothgiesser; woodcut initials and head- and tailpieces. Contemporary blind-ruled leather, remnants of ties.
  € 11,000
First complete German edition of an important and entertaining travel account by Johann Albrecht von Mandelslo, edited by Adam Olearius. Mandelslo was attached to the diplomatic mission of Frederick III, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp, to Moscow and Persia. Frederick's aim was to negotiate a new trade route for Persian silk and to make his small duchy an important centre of European silk trade. After visiting Moscow, the mission continued along the Volga to Astrakhan and from there to Persia, crossing the Caspian Sea near Shamakhi. Via Ardabil, Qazvin and Kasan the party finally reached the capital, Isfahan. The ambassadors remained in Persia for several months (only to return without concrete results), but Mandelslo travelled further to the east. He sailed from Hormuz to Surat and proceeded through Gujarat to Agra, Lahore, Goa, Bijapur and Malaba, visiting Ceylon, Madagascar, the Cape of Good Hope and St. Helena on his return voyage in 1639. Before his death 5 years later, he had entrusted his rough notes to Olearius, who subsequently published them with a third part containing descriptions of the Coromandel coast, Bengal, Siam, Sumatra, Java, Borneo, Bantam, the Philippines, Formosa (Tai-wan), China and Japan. Small contemporary owner's entry ("Jos[eph] Baudler"?). Some foxing and brownstaining; slight tears in lower margin of pp. 31 and 137. A very good copy of an important account of an embassy to Persia and further to the East. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 23:233226D. Lipperheide Ld 1. Adelung II, pp. 306-308. Alt-Japan-Katalog 943. Bircher A 6927f. Cordier, Japonica, cols. 362-368. Cox I, 271f. Dünnhaupt, pp. 293-294, 30.1. V. Gelder, Het Oost-Indisch avontuur, pp. 77, 99, 263. Howgego I M38. Commissariat, "Mandelslo's Travels in Western India", in: The Geographical Journal, 78 (1931), pp. 375ff.
 

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200 Matthäus de Flentin. De Viennae obsidione soluta, & Turcis fugatis, paraphrasis super hymno Te Deum laudamus. Rome, Paolo Moneta, 1683 ("MCDLXXXIII"). 4to. (8) ff. With armorial title woodcut, initial, and tailpiece. Later wrappers.
  € 950
Rare encomium composed for the relief of Vienna from the Ottoman siege, to be sung to the tune of "Te Deum laudamus". Matthäus de Flentin from Liège also edited, in 1687, Fioravante Martinelli's "Roma ricercata nel suo sito". - Trimmed closely; first and final leaf show additional trimming at lower edge. A single copy in library catalogues (British Library). (more)
  ¶ OCLC 561030898.
 

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201 Mayer, Luigi. Views in Egypt. London, Thomas Bensley for R. Bowyer, 1801 [text watermarked 1794; plates watermarked 1801]. Folio. With 48 fine hand-coloured aquatint plates. (Bound with) II: The same. Views in the Ottoman Empire. 1803 [plates watermarked 1801]. With 24 fine hand-coloured aquatint plates. Contemp. red straight-grain morocco, gilt.
  € 8,500
First editions. - The German-Italian artist Luigi Mayer (1755-1803) was one of the foremost late 18th-century European painters of the Ottoman Empire. He was a close friend of Sir Robert Ainslie, British ambassador to Turkey between 1776 and 1792, and the bulk of his paintings and drawings during this period were commissioned by him. Mayer travelled extensively throughout the Ottoman Empire and became well known for his sketches and paintings of panoramic landscapes of ancient sites from the Balkans to Turkey and Egypt, particularly ancient monuments and the Nile. Many of the works were amassed in Ainslie's collection, which was later presented to the British Museum, providing a valuable insight into the Middle East of that period. "La plupart de ces planches sont interessantes pour les costumes" (Colas). - Title and text of the "Ottoman Empire" volume in English and French; final plate working loose and with some creasing. Offsetting and occasional spotting, mostly to head of first few ff. Spine-ends worn and scuffed; corners worn; a few scratches to binding, rubbed. (more)
  ¶ Abbey, Travel, 369. Atabey 785-787. Blackmer 1097, 1098. Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 26. Colas 2018, 2021. Brunet III, 1556. Graesse IV, 456. Cf. Weber I, 1101 (later ed. 1804). Lipperheide Ma 8 (ed. 1805 only). Hiler 577 (ed. 1804).
 

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202 Mayer, Luigi. A Selection of the Most Interesting of Sir Robert Ainslie's Celebrated Collection of Views in Turkey in Europe, and in Asia. London, T. Bensley f. R. Bowyer, 1811. Folio (340 x 490 mm). 2 ff, 24 coloured aquatints (1 folding). Contemp. half calf with giltstamped red morocco label to marbled front cover, spine rebacked and gilt.
  € 4,500
"The plates in this selection are not re-engraved, but plates available from the stock originally printed for Bowyer, with new title page" (Atabey). Includes views of Constantinople, the Voivode palace of Bucharest, Tripoli and Tortosa, a mosque in Laodicea, as well as antiquities from the Eolian Islands and Ephesus. - The German-Italian artist Luigi Mayer (1755-1803) was one of the foremost late 18th-century European painters of the Ottoman Empire. He was a close friend of Sir Robert Ainslie, British ambassador to Turkey between 1776 and 1792, and the bulk of his paintings and drawings during this period were commissioned by him. Mayer travelled extensively throughout the Ottoman Empire and became well known for his sketches and paintings of panoramic landscapes of ancient sites from the Balkans to Turkey and Egypt, particularly ancient monuments and the Nile. Many of the works were amassed in Ainslie's collection, which was later presented to the British Museum, providing a valuable insight into the Middle East of that period. - Occasional insignificant brownstaining. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 790. Chatzipanagioti-S. 631. Hage Chahine 56. Cf. Blackmer 1100. Abbey 369.
 

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203 McGregor, James. Medical Sketches of the Expedition to Egypt, from India. London, John Murray, Bell & Bradfute, Gilbert & Hodges, 1804. 8vo. (4), XV, (5), 238 (but: 236), 8 pp. (adverts). With folded table. Contemp. boards.
  € 1,800
First edition. - James McGregor (McGrigor, 1771-1858) joined the English army as a surgeon in 1793 and served on Jersey, in Holland, on the Antilles, in India, and in Egypt. "His quite important literary publications consist mainly in reports of a historico-geographical nature and in accounts of various epidemics he witnessed during his campaigns" (Hirsch/H.). - Binding rubbed; somewhat brownstained throughout. Untrimmed copy from the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Hirsch/Hübotter IV, 9. OCLC 14848987. Not in Ibrahim-Hilmy or Wellcome. pkpk
 

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With the portrait of Abdullah ibn Saud in hand colour and the earliest map showing Riyadh
204 Mengin, Felix. Histoire de l'égypte sous le gouvernement de Mohammed-Aly, ou recit des Evenemens Politiques et Militaires qui ont eu lieu depuis le Depart des Francais jusqu’en 1823. Paris, A. Bertrand, 1823. 2 text vols. in 8vo and atlas in folio. 464 pp. 644 pp. (8), 12 lithogr. plates (6 of them hand-coloured), including a folding hand-coloured plan and the folding, double-page map of the Nejd. Contemp. full calf with giltstamped spine labels (text) and original green cardboard portfolio with printed title label to cover (atlas); maps and plates loosely inserted within.
  € 18,500
First edition, the extremely rare coloured issue. Mengin's history of Egypt from the end of the French expedition to Khedive Muhammad Ali's dramatic reforms of Egyptian society and culture is mainly sought for its extensive appendix containing an early chronicle of the Wahhabis, with an account of the sack of Derrieh. "This chronicle is ascribed to a grandson of the Shaykh named 'le cheykh Abderrahman el-Oguyeh', presumably this is Abd al-Rahman ibn Hasan (d. 1869)", who travelled from Basra to Mecca and Medina (M. Cook, below). The folio-sized atlas contains the celebrated portrait of Abdullah ibn Saud, leader of the first Saudi state, who was executed by the Turks for sedition, and the famous, large map of the Nejd country with an inset of the environs of "El-Derreth" near Riyadh by E. F. Jombard. His commentary on the map is of particular note, being a synthesis of Arab and western knowledge, with many place names added for the first time. This "notice géographique" (vol. II, pp. 549-613) also includes a "nomenclature du pays de Nedjid", mentioning - among other places - Dubai and Qatar both in the original Arabic and in French transliteration. - Some waterstaining throughout, but confined to margins. The work is rarely found complete with both text volumes and the atlas as present; even the map has separately commanded several thousand pounds at auctions (cf. Sotheby's London, 6 May 2010, lot 147). Copies in contemporary hand colour are highly uncommon. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1577. Atabey 802 (without the Atlas). Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 30. Michael Cook. On the Origins of Wahhabism. In: Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol. 2, No. 2 (July 1992), pp. 191-202, at 192.
 

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205 Mildenhall, John / Cartwright, John; [Purchas, Samuel (ed.)]. Oost-Indise voyagien van Johan Mildenhal, en Johan Cartwright, onder veel avontuuren en opmerkelijke waarnemingen, (in de jaren 1599 en 1606) te water en te lande, gedaan na de landen van Persien en den Grooten Mogol. Leiden, Pieter van der Aa, 1706. 8vo. (2), 54, (6) pp. With engraved title vignette, folding engr. map of Persia and northern Arabia, and 2 double-page-sized engraved plates. Papered spine.
  € 950
First Dutch translation of "The travailes of John Mildenhall" and "Observations of Master John Cartwright" (from "Purchas his Pilgrimes", London, 1625, vol. 1, bk. 3, pp. 114-116, and vol. 2, pp. 1422-1437). The merchant adventurer John Mildenhall, "probably the first Englishman to travel overland to India" (Howgego I, 719), spent six months in Constantinople before, in July 1600, departing for Aleppo, proceeding to Bir, Urfa, Diabekr, Sultanieh, Qazvin, and ultimately Lahore. He returned to England in 1605/06. The English preacher John Cartwright accompanied him from Aleppo to Kashan in Persia, then proceeded to Esfahan alone "and travelled widely in the Middle East. The account of his journeys is one of the most valuable of the period" (Howgego I, 197). (more)
  ¶ Tiele 5. Muller (Books, maps, plates on America) 1890f. Alden 707/2. J. C. Brown cat. III, 88. OCLC 746499809, 69110890.
 

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206 Mir Khvand, Muhammad ibn Khavandshah / Turan Shah ibn Qutb al-Din / Stevens, John (transl.). The History of Persia. Containing the Lives and Memorable Actions of its Kings from the first Erecting of that Monarchy to this Time and exact Description of all its Dominions, a curious Account of India, China, Tartary, Kermon, Arabia, Nixabur, and the Ilands of Ceylin and Timor; as also of all Cities occasionally mention’d, as schiras, Samarkand, Bokara, &c. Manners and Customs of those People, Persian Worshippers of Fire; Plants, Beasts, Product, and Trade. With Many instructive and pleasant Digression, being remarkable Stories or Passages, occasionally occurring, as Strange Burials; Burning of the Dead; Liquors of several Countries; Hunting; Fishing; Practice of Physick; famous Physicians in the East; Actions of Tamerlan, &c. To which is Added, An Abridgement of the Lives of the Kings of Harmuz, or Ormuz. The Persian History written in Arabick, by Mirkand, a famous Eastern Author that of Ormuz, by Torunxa, King of that Island, both of them Translated into Spanish, by Antony Teixeira who liv’d several years in Persia and India; and now render’d into English. London, Jonas Brown, 1715. 8vo. (16), 416 pp. Bound without the frontispiece as usual. Handsomely rebound in period style blind tooled full panelled calf, intricate gilt decorations, raised bands with gilt compartments and gilt lettered title label to spine, marbled endpapers.
  € 2,500
First edition in English. "A translation, with additions, of Pedro Teixeira’s ’Relaciones [...] d’el origen [...] de los reyes de Persia, [...]’, first published in 1610, and itself compiled from the histories of Mir Khwand and Turan Shah. The text is continuous despite pagination" (ESTC). Several additions from more recent writers bring Mirkhood’s history up to date. - Some light browning, otherwise an attractive copy. (more)
  ¶ Goldsmiths’ 5195. Wilson 216. Cox I, 251. ESTC T92864. OCLC 222794814.
 

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Dedication copy for Prince Metternich
207 Mislin, [Jacques]. Les saints lieux. Pélerinage à Jérusalem, en passant par l'Autriche, la Hongrie, la Slavonie, les provinces danubiennes, Constantinople, l'Archipel, le Liban, la Syrie, Alexandrie, Malte, la Sicile et Marseille. Paris & Lyon, Gyot Frères, 1851. Large 8vo. 2 vols. (2), IV, 447, (3) pp. (4), 490, (6) pp. With 9 (2 folding) lithogr. plates. Contemp. stamped calf with cover fillets; spine and leading edges gilt; gilt inner dentelle; white silk endpapers. All edges gilt. Signed "J. Hutter".
  € 5,000
Inscribed copy for Prince Metternich in contemporary signed master bindings, including a manuscript by Metternich bound within vol. 1. - First edition of this classic travel report, narrating an 1848 journey from Vienna to the Holy Land via Budapest and Constantinople. Library label of Prince Clemens Wenzel Lothar von Metternich (1773-1859) on front pastedown; flyleaf inscribed by the author: "A Son Altesse, Le Prince de Metternich. Hommage respecteux de l'auteur. Vienne, le 15 mai 1852. Mislin". Below this, there is a later note by the author: "Le Prince a ma demande m'a rendu cet exemplaire lorsque je lui en donnai un de la seconde édition. Mislin. Vienne, le 25 Décembre 1857". In addition, vol. 1 contains a bifolium bound after p. 140, with 2½ pages of autograph notes by Metternich about the conflict between Christians and the Druze people, analysing the influence and interests of France and England in this dispute (with Mislin's confirmation of authenticity). "Mislin's writings show the signs of scholarship and they profit from their excellent style" (cf. Tobler). - Occasional insignificant browning, otherwise very finely preserved provenance copy in a splendid binding for one of the 19th century's pre-eminent statesmen. The Aboussouan copy (2nd ed. only) commanded £1,600 at Sotheby's in 1993. (more)
  ¶ Röhricht 2177. Tobler 178f. (both "1852"). Cf. Aboussouan 647 (2nd ed. 1858). Weber I, 577 (1860 German ed.). Not in Blackmer or Atabey.
 

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208 Mittwoch, Eugen. Proelia Arabum paganorum (Ajjâm al 'Arab) quomodo litteris tradita sint. Berlin, Mayer & Müller, 1899. 4to. 44, (4) pp., interleaved throughout. Contemp. marbled half cloth with giltstamped spine label.
  € 500
Dissertation of Eugen Mittwoch (1876-1942), the groundbreaking German scholar who is considered one of the founders of modern Islamic Studies, about the chronicles of the Arabic wars. This constitutes the author's first academic foray into Arabic studies. - Old ink library shelfmark on verso of title page, otherwise fine. (more)
  ¶ NDB XVII, 591. NYPL Arabia coll. 32. Cf. GAL S I, 162.
 

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209 Moltke, [Helmuth] von. The Russians in Bulgaria and Rumelia in 1828 and 1829, during the campaigns of the Danube, the sieges of Brailow, Varna, Silistria, Shumla, and the passage of the Balkan by Marshall Diebitch. London, John Murray, 1854. 8vo. VI, (2), 476 pp. With folding map and 12 battle-plans on 11 folding plates. Original red cloth with giltstamped spine title.
  € 650
First English edition of Moltke's "Der russisch-türkische Feldzug in der europäischen Türkei 1828-1829" (Berlin 1845). A brilliant account of the Russo-Turkish War of 1828/29, sparked by the Greek War of Independence. "BM 162:392 attributes the translation to Lady Duff Gordon" (OCLC). The preface erroneously states the autor to be dead. - Occasional insignificant foxing; some wear to extremeties. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 3800702.
 

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The first known printed reference to the Gulf region, with the earliest map to call the Gulf “Sinus Arabicus” instead of “Sinus Persicus”
210 Montalboddo, Fracanzano da. Itinerarium Portugallensium e Lusitania in Indiam et inde occidentem et demum ad aquilonem. [Milan, J. A. Scinzenzeler], 1508. Folio (248 x 197 mm). 10, 88 ff. (the two index leaves bound before text). Title with full-page woodcut map (second issue, with "Arabicus" replacing "P[er]sicus"). Early 20th century red morocco with title gilt to spine, boards and dentelles ruled in gilt, all edges gilt.
  € 780,000
First Latin edition of the most important and "earliest printed collection of voyages and discoveries" (PMM). Also the only edition of this collection of travel reports to include the map showing Africa, Arabia and part of Europe, illustrating for the first time the new discoveries in the eastern hemisphere. This map, not included in the original 1507 Italian edition or any subsequent edition, is the earliest to show Africa completely surrounded by seas and, as one of the first non-Ptolemaic maps to include Arabia, definitely the earliest "modern" printed map to show Mecca. Published in 1508, it raises a controversy still with us more than 500 years later: it labels the Red Sea and the Gulf as a single body of water and calls it the Gulf, but in the first state of the block it was called the "Persian Gulf" ("Sinus Persicus"). For reasons unknown, the editor revised the block with a patch to rename it the "Arabian Gulf" ("Sinus Arabicus"). The map therefore exists in two different states in copies of this edition. Ours is the rarer second one, with "Sinus Arabicus". Considered a "vehicle for the dissemination throughout Renaissance Europe of the news of the great discoveries both in the east and the west" (PMM), the present collection contains reports of the voyages of Columbus, Vespucci, Cabral (Brazil), Cadamos (Africa) and, perhaps most importantly, "the earliest printed account of the voyage of Vasco da Gama" to India (PMM). This voyage to the eastern hemisphere is comparable in importance only to Columbus's in the west, as it "opened the way for the maritime invasion of the East by Europe" (PMM). - Da Gama's pioneering sea voyage ranks amongst the greatest historic events of the second millennium and as "one of the defining moments in the history of exploration" (BBC History, online). It is also considered the turning point in the political history of the Arabian Gulf region, followed as it was by a prolonged period of east-west commerce, conquest and conflict. For better or worse, the discovery of the first all-water trade route between Europe and India catalyzed a series of events that forever changed the political history and geography of the world. Portugal was the first European power to take an active interest in the Gulf region: "Vasco da Gama made the first known reference to this area when he traveled through the Strait of Hormuz to the sheikhdom of Julfar" (Romano). In Julfar, today known as Ras al-Khaimah and part of the United Arab Emirates, Da Gama made contact with the Islamic navigator Ahmed ibn Majid, still remembered as the "first Arabic seaman". On the basis of Portuguese and Arabic records, it has now been established that it was Ibn Majid who finally piloted Vasco da Gama's ship to India using an Arabian map then unknown to European sailors, who previously had been unable to cross the Arabian sea. By gaining trading access to Arabia and India, the Portuguese seized control of the whole region within a few years after Da Gama's discovery and were to dominate the Gulf area for centuries: "In less than two decades, Portuguese forces occupied Julfar and controlled the lower Gulf region. Eventually, the Portuguese extended their presence as far north as the island nation of Bahrein" (Romano). - Engraved bookplate of Dr. Samuel X. Radbill (1901-87) on pastedown. Radbill bought the volume at Sotheby's on 24 July 1939 (lot 176); it remained in his famous collection until it was acquired by us from his descendants in 2014. Foot of map creased as folded for binding, head of first 3 leaves with a stain and last 5 leaves with corner stains, binding slightly rubbed. Overall a very bright and clean copy. Of extraordinary rarity: our copy is one of only three complete copies of the present issue, with "Sinus Persicus" renamed "Sinus Arabicus", to have appeared at auction in the 20th century. (more)
  ¶ Borba de Moraes I, 580. Harrisse 58. Sabin 50058. Church 27. Cf. PMM 42. A. Romano, A Historical Atlas of the United Arab Emirates, New York 2004, 26.
 

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211 [Monterroyo Mascarenhas, José Freire de]. Relaçam da solemne procissam de preces, que por ordem da Corte Ottomana fizeraô os Turcos na Cidade de Meca, para alcançar a assistencia de Deos contra as armas do Augustissimo Emperador de Alemanha, & mais potencias Christãas. Lisbon, na Officina de Pascoal da Sylva, 1716. 4to. 8 pp. Disbound.
  € 850
Account of a pilgrimage to Mecca ordered by the Ottoman court to invoke divine assistance against the Christian forces in the Austro-Turkish War of 1716-18. The practical value of this pilgrimage turned out to be limited: in August that same year, Prince Eugene of Savoy defeated the Turks at Petrovaradin; in 1717 he recaptured Belgrade, defeating the Turkish forces with an overwhelmingly outnumbered army; in 1718 the Treaty of Passarowitz was signed, in which the Ottomans had to surrender large areas to Habsburg Empire, which now reached its greatest territorial expanse in history. - Translated into Portuguese and published by José Freire de Monterroyo Mascarenhas (1670-1760), the polyglot editor of numerous travel accounts and topical pamphlets. Rare; OCLC lists only two copies in America (Yale, Toronto). Occasional slight brownstaining. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 222370772. Cf. Apponyi 2402, 2405.
 

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Photos taken by the author during his travels between 1905 and 1915
212 Moritz, Bernhard. Bilder aus Palästina, Nord-Arabien und dem Sinai. 100 Bilder nach Photographien mit erläuterndem Text. Berlin, Reimer, 1916. Oblong folio. 106 illustrations on 50 plates, each with separate title, in various sizes. With text booklet (2 ff., 16 pp.). Original half cloth portfolio.
  € 40,000
Rare photographic work documenting important cities and parts of the countryside in Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Syria, Egypt, and Palestine. Most of the photos were taken by the author during his travels between 1905 and 1915. The images of northern Hejaz, Mecca, and Medina, which Moritz was unable to visit, were taken by Turkish friends. The images also show the construction of the Hejaz Railway between Damascus and the holy sites of Mecca and Medina, as well as views of Medina, Mecca, Jeddah, Petra, and Jerusalem. - Plates and text are well preserved; portfolio shows slight traces of repairs. (more)
 

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213 Movses Khorenac'i (Moses Chorensis). Patmut'iwn ew ashxarhagruth'iwn. Historiae Armeniacae libri III. Accedit ejusdem scriptoris epitome geographiae. London, Charles Ackers for John Whiston, 1736. 4to (27 x 22 cm). (4), XXIV, 412 pp. With 1 engraved map. Contemporary sprinkled leather with 5 raised bands and giding to spine.
  € 2,500
Rare second edition of this work on Armenian history, geography and literature. "Contains a chronological list of Armenian kings and patriarchs. According to Talbot Reed, 'History of old English foundries' (p. 68) the first Armenian type in England was that presented by Dr Fell to Oxford in 1667. In 1736 Calson cut a neat Armenian (pica) for the publication of the above edition of Movses Xorenac'i. These were the only founts in England before 1820" (Nersessian). "Rare and highly prized. The geographical section first appeared in in Armenian in Amsterdam in 1668, 12mo. and the Armenian history (very flawed) in Amsterdam in 1695, sm.-8vo" (cf. Ebert). - In parallel Armenian-Latin text throughout. 2 leaves with open tears to margins (affecting text on Hh1). Head shows insignificant worming, otherwise a very well-preserved binding. (more)
  ¶ Nersessian 123. Voskanian 433. Graesse IV, 614. Ebert 14457. OCLC 79557739.
 

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214 Murphy, C[harles] C[ecil] R[owe]. Soldiers of the Prophet. London, John Hogg, 1921. 8vo. 233, (1) pp. Giltstamped green half calf. Top edge gilt.
  € 950
Only edition. First-hand account of military and intelligence operations in the Gulf area prior to and during World War I, including chapters on "The Arab Revolt in Kermak", "The Rebellion in Oman", "The Persian Gulf in 1913-14", etc. Lt.-Colonel C. C. R. Murphy, 30th Punjabis, from the Suffolk Regiment, wrote several works of military history. - Slight browning; minor chipping to top edge near beginning of volume. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 13460560. Not in Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula.
 

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215 Musil, Alois. Arabia Petraea. Vienna, Hölder, 1907-1908. 4to. 3 in 4 vols. With 2 folding maps and one folding panorama. Numerous illustrations and plans. Original wrappers.
  € 9,500
First edition of this standard work on the region: the first scientific account of the Nabataean antiquities, including the ruins of Petra. The Bohemian scholar Alois Musil (1868-1944) was fluent in 35 Arabic dialects. In 1898 he had rediscovered the lost desert castle of Qusayr Amra (built c. 715 A.D.) in the Jordanian desert north of Amman. During WWI he was sent to the Middle East to thwart British operations against the Ottoman Empire, thus becoming the opponent of T. E. Lawrence. In 1827 he helped establish the Oriental Institute of the Academy of Sciences in Prague. - With contemp. ownership "Dr. Zweig" on wrapper covers (in Hebrew and German). Some pages uncut; professional repairs to edges. Rare with all 4 volumes; no complete copy recorded at auction during the past decades. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1667. Howgego III, M103 (p. 664). Fück 262. NYPL Arabia coll. 171. OCLC 3114451.
 

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216 Musil, Alois. The Northern Hegaz. A Topographical Itinerary. New York, American Geographical Society, 1926. 374 pp. With 86 text illustrations and 2 folded maps. Original publisher's grey cloth boards.
  € 400
Very scarce original edition of important, oft-reprinted Musil's work on northern Arabia. "As Musil was personally acquainted with the leading personages of Inner Arabia, the work takes on the quality of a source for contemporary history" (cf. Fück). - In very good condition. (more)
  ¶ Macro 1674. Howgego III, M103. Fück 263. pkpk
 

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217 Musil, Alois. The Manners and Customs of the Rwala Bedouins. New York, American Geographical Society, 1928. XIV, 712 pp. With portrait frontispiece with tissue guard and 59 illustrations in the text. Original publisher's grey cloth boards.
  € 750
Very scarce original edition of Musil's ethnographic work on northern Arabia. "Extremely illuminating with regard to the Bedouin culture of all times […] Contains a wealth of linguistic matter, particularly […] songs and poetry, the close study of which remains a task for future scholarship" (cf. Fück). Reprints are common. - Corners slightly bumped. (more)
  ¶ Howgego III, M103. Fück 264. OCLC 1458720.
 

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218 Musil, Alois. In the Arabian Desert. New York, Horace Liveright, 1930. Illustrated with 40 photographs and a map at rear. Original publisher's black cloth boards with gilt titles to spine and cover.
  € 300
First edition of this popular account of Musil's experiences in Arabia Deserta. An excellent copy. (more)
  ¶ Macro 1669.
 

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One of the finest works on medical plants, including a depiction of the "Commiphora gileadensis", source of the Balsam of Mecca
219 Nees von Esenbeck, Theodor Friedrich Ludwig. Plantae officinales oder Sammlung officineller Pflanzen. Düsseldorf, Arnz & Co., [1821]-1833. Folio. 4 volumes (1 text volume, 2 plates volumes and the supplement volume with plates and interleaved text). (406); (96) ff. plus plates. With lithographed titlepages in plates and supplement volumes; in total 552 plates (the plates volumes with in total 432 lithographed plates (425 hand-coloured, 7 black and white); the supplement volume with 120 hand-coloured lithographed plates. Contemporary red half sheepskin.
  € 19,500
Rare complete set with the supplement (often lacking) of a sumptuous botanical work with 552 striking lithographic plates by Aimée Henry. Among the plants and trees depicted are the date palm, the aforementioned Commiphora gileadensis, and the Acacia Arabica. The work was begun by M. F. Weyhe, J. W. Wolter and P. W. Funke, and finished by the important German botanist and pharmacologist Theodor Friedrich Ludwig Nees von Esenbeck (1787-1837), best remembered for his systematic research on the medical properties of plants, which helped to establish pharmacology as a serious academic discipline. The plates appeared in installments between 1822 and 1828, followed by several instalments of text, and finally a supplement volume in 1833. Some confusion exists as to the general title of the work, since the volumes of plates are titled "Plantae medicinales", whereas the text volume was published as "Plantae officinales". Bookplate and library stamps in each volume. Some browning and foxing as usual; bindings worn. A good set, rare in its present complete form. (more)
  ¶ GFB, p. 69. Johnston 945. Nissen, BBI 1442. Plesch p. 347. Pritzel 6662. Stafleu/C. 17391. Cf. Graesse IV, 655.
 

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220 Nicolay, Nicolas. Le navigationi et viaggi nella Turchia. Antwerp, Willem Silvius, 1576. 8vo. (14) pp., 1 blank f., 328 (but: 408), (30) pp., final blank f. With woodcut title border and 60 full-page costume woodcuts in the text. 17th-century vellum with ms. title to spine.
  € 12,500
Rare first Italian edition, published in the same year and by the same printer as the second French one. "Fort estimée et recherchée pour les excellentes figures" (Olschki). Silvius re-issued the book in 1577 with a new title page; he simultaneously produced a German and a Dutch version, all with the same illustrations, considered "the first serious introduction to Turkish costume" (Atabey). The costumes include Janissaries, merchants, pilgrims, peasants, clerics, a physician, a cook, etc. "C'est la première série de documents sérieux sur les habillements du proche Orient" (Colas). The woodcuts, based on the etchings in the original edition, which appeared in Lyon in 1567/68, are usually attributed to Assuerus van Londerseel (Ahasver von Landfeldt), but Mortimer, Funck and Hollstein cite Antonij van Leest. "Nicolay was the royal geographer sent by Henri II to Constantinople to join d'Aramon's embassy in 1551. [...] The engraved plates are attributed to Louis Danet, or Louis Thiry" (Atabey). - Some browning due to paper; several marginalia, some slight edge flaws. A fine copy from the library of the Counts Costa della Trinità with their bookplate. (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 31562. Adams N 251. BM-STC Dutch 160. Atabey 871. Blackmer 1196 (note). Göllner 1663. Funck 368. Colas 2203. Hiler 656. Hollstein X, 43. Olschki 3967. OCLC 43806648. Cf. Lipperheide Lb 2 (French ed.). Mortimer (Italian) 319; (French) 386. Weber II, 167. Olschki 4906f.
 

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An Arabic merchant; an Emir descended from Muhammad; pilgrims returning from Makkah
221 [Nicolay d'Arfeuille, Nicolas / Artus, Thomas]. Plusieurs descriptions des accoustremens, tant des magistrats et officiers de la porte de l'Empereur des Turcs, que des peuples assujectis à son Empire. [Paris, Guillemot, 1632]. Folio (240 x 376 mm). 65 ff., 66-114, (4) pp. With 79 (incl. 1 repeat) engravings in the text. Contemporary leather binding over wooden boards (restored) with 8 brass bosses to corners. Remains of clasps.
  € 5,000
These explanations of the Ottoman and Arabian costume engravings based on the account of Nicolas Nicolay d'Arfeuille and on the Byzantine prophecies of Thomas Artus, Sieur d’Embry (c. 1550-after 1614), who is known for his satirical take on the French court, "Les Hermaphrodites", were variously published throughout the 17th century as an appendix to the history of the Ottoman Empire of Chalkokondyles, but were also issued separately, as is the case with the present copy. The repeated plate 60/61 and the duplicated plate number 64 identify this as Guillemot's 1632 Paris edition. Among the plates are an "Arabic merchant", an "Emir, descended from Muhammad", "Pilgrims returning from Makkah", a "Persian gentleman", a "Turkish lady dressed for going to town" etc.; at the end: prophecies foretelling the downfall of the Ottoman Empire. - Occasional insignificant brownstaining; some slight worming (also touching text and images); some repaired edge defects. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Colas 2207 (note). OCLC 83490314. Cf. Hage Chahine 860. This edition not in Hiler or Lipperheide.
 

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222 Nicole, Gustave. Inauguration du Canal du Suez. Voyage des Souverains, aquarelles d'après nature et portraits par Riou. [Paris, Lemercier & Cie., 1870]. Folio (404 x 558 mm). 34 pp. With 17 lithographed plates (11 partly coloured by hand). (Bound with) II: Marius Fontane. Voyage pittoresque à travers l'Isthme de Suez, vingt-cinq grandes aquarelles d'après nature par Riou. Paris, Paul Dupont & E. Lachaud, [1870]. 76 (instead of 100) pp. With coloured map and 20 (of 25) chromolithographic plates. Contemporary red half morocco, giltstamped covers (arms of Ismail Pasha) and giltstamped title to spine.
  € 15,000
First edition. A chronicle of the elaborate festivities given for the inauguration of the Suez Canal (Qanat al-Suwais), opened in November 1869 after ten years of construction work - an event attended by the most prestigious occidental figures, finely illustrated by Riou, the Khedive's official painter. In 1854/56 Ferdinand de Lesseps obtained a concession from Sa'id Pasha, the Khedive of Egypt and Sudan, to create a company to construct a canal open to ships of all nations, which would allow ship transport between Europe and eastern Asia without navigation around Africa. Lesseps had used his friendly relationship with Sa'id, which he had developed while he was a French diplomat during the 1830s. In 1863, Sa'id was succeeded by his nephew Ismail, known as The Magnificent, who now oversaw the Egyptian portion of the Canal's construction. On his accession, he refused to ratify the concessions to the Canal company made by Said, insisting on numerous changes upon in the original grant. Ismail then used every available means, by his own powers of fascination and by judicious expenditure, to bring his personality before the foreign sovereigns and public. In 1867 he visited Paris and London, where he was received by Queen Victoria and welcomed by the Lord Mayor. While in Britain he also saw a British Royal Navy Fleet Review with the Ottoman Sultan. In 1869 he again paid a visit to Britain. When the Canal finally opened, Ismail held a festival of unprecedented scope, inviting dignitaries from around the world. Ismail himself performed the grand opening, together with French Empress Eugenie in the Imperial yacht "Aigle", piloted by Napoléon Coste who was bestowed by the Khedive the Order of the Medjidie. - The painter Riou also signed the plates of the second part: a detailed account of the canal construction by Marius Fontane, secretary to Lesseps. 500 copies of Fontane's work were printed, with 200 reserved for the Khedive Ismail, of which this is one. As the Khedive objected to the preface of Fontane's work, which gave credit for the canal to Lesseps, he had removed Lesseps' portrait frontispiece, the preface, and the final six gatherings (which included plates 21-25). - Occasional foxing to plates, otherwise an excellent copy. (more)
  ¶ I: Blackmer 1198, 611. Heritage Library, Islamic Treasures, s. v. "Art". OCLC 458881758. Cf. Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 66 (1869). II: Cf. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 235. Gay 2439 (both citing 25 plates).
 

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223 Niebuhr, Carsten. Beschreibung von Arabien. Aus eigenen Beobachtungen und im Lande selbst gesammelten Nachrichten abgefasset. Copenhagen, Nikolaus Möller, 1772. 4to. XLVII, (1), 431, (1) pp. With 24 engr. plates (several folding and with touches of colour) and large engr. map of Yemen. Original boards with. ms. title spine.
  € 3,500
First edition. Includes Niebuhr's famous map of the Yemen and Arabic specimens from the Qur'an, with added hand colouring to indicate vowel sounds. "L'on voit [...] sur la IV et V planche, une feuille copiée d'un Korân, qui est écrit sur du parchemin et conservé comme un grand thresor dans la collection de livres faites par l'Académie Dsjamea el ashar à Kahira, parce qu'on croit, que le Calife Omar l'a écrit de sa propre main. Mais quand Omar ne l'auroit pas écrit, cette feuille est toujours très ancienne et par là-même remarquable" (Chauvin). The famous account of the Royal Danish Expedition (1761-67) to the Middle East, Egypt, Persia and India, the first scientific expedition to this area. Niebuhr's "work on Arabia was the first European attempt at a complete account of Arabia, its people and their way of life. He amassed a vast quantity of factual information which he relates in a simple unrhetorical fashion, distinguishing clearly between things observed personally and things learned from others. The expedition, which lasted six years, was sponsored by the Danish king, and included the brilliant Swedish scientist, Peter Forsskal, who died while in Yemen" (Cat. Sotheby‘s, 13 Oct 98, lot 1010). Of the five scientists, Carsten Niebuhr (1733-1815) was the sole survivor, and his work represents an important contribution to the study of the Middle East. His map of the Yemen, the first exact map of the area ever, remained the standard for the next 200 years. "Niebuhr's comprehensive description [...] was the best and most authentic of the day. Many subsequent travellers have acknowledged their debt to him, and only on a few minor points have they shown him to be in error. He was scientifically and philosophically minded, cautious and steady, and hardly the man to masquerade in Mekkah or wander with the Bedouins, but few contributed more solidly to the study of Arabia" (Atabey cat., 1st French ed.: Copenhagen, 1773). - Insignificant edge tear to final map. A fine, untrimmed copy with broad margins, spotless throughout. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1699. Howgego I, N24 (p. 752). Lipperheide Lc 6. Graesse IV, 674. Heritage Library, Qatar, p. 10. Cf. Chauvin X, p. 57, no. 128; XII, p. 288, no. 1206. Hesse III, 611. Weber II, 548. Gay 3589. Carter, Robert A. Sea of Pearls, p. 116. Not in Atabey.
 

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The first edition of Michaelis's Questions, published together with Niebuhr's Description of Arabia
224 Niebuhr, Carsten. Description de l'Arabie, faite sur des observations propres et des avis recueillis dans les lieux mêmes. Amsterdam & Utrecht, S. J. Baalde / J. van Schoonhoven & Co., 1774. 2 vols. 4to. XLII, 372 pp. With engraved title (in counted prelims.) (And:) [Johann David] Michaelis. Recueil de questions, proposées à une société de savants, qui par ordre de Sa Majesté Danoise font le voyage de l'Arabie. Ibid., 1774. (2), XLIV, (2), 256, (16), 38, (14) pp. With 25 engraved plates (8 folding, including large engraved map of the Yemen, in partial colour). Uniformly bound in contemp. calf with red morocco lettering pieces to fully gilt spine. Marbled endpapers. All edges red.
  € 5,000
The second French edition (first in Copenhagen the previous year), of importance because it was accompanied by Michaelis's programmatic 'Questions', proposed at the outset of the expedition in 1762 and published here for the first time. Of the five savants who went on the expedition, some were pupils of Michaelis, the most celebrated orientalist of his day, and it was to him that Niebuhr turned for a list of subjects to be investigated and questions to be asked. - A flawless, wide-margined copy in contemporary French bindings. The second volume with Michaelis's Questions also contains all the plates except the Yemen map, which is bound opposite page 160 in the Niebuhr volume. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin X, p. 57, no. 128; XII, p. 288, no. 1206. Howgego I, N24 (p. 752). Weber II, 548. Gay 3589. Nyon 21017. Grenoble 25621. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1699. Carter, Robert A. Sea of Pearls, p. 116. Not in Atabey or Blackmer.
 

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Account of the first scientific expedition to the Middle East, Egypt, Persia and India
225 Niebuhr, Carsten. Reize naar Arabië en andere omliggende landen. Amsterdam & Utrecht, (J. J. Besseling for) S. J. Baalde / J. van Schoonhoven & Co. (I) / Bartolomé Wild (II), 1776-1780. 4to (285 x 233 mm). 2 vols. VIII, (6), 484, (2) pp. (16), 455, (1) pp. With engraved vignette by N. van der Meer to each title-page, 94 plates (30 folding, 64 full-page), and 31 maps and plans (7 folding, 24 full-page, of which the folding map of Yemen handcoloured in outline), engraved by C. Philips, Th. and C. H. de Koning, C. J. de Huyser, C. F. Fritsch, O. de Vries and others. 19th-century half calf. Untrimmed.
  € 6,000
First Dutch translation of this important and famous account of the Royal Danish Expedition (1761-67) to the Middle East, Egypt, Persia and India, the first scientific expedition to this area. The original German edition was published in Copenhagen in 1744-1778 under the title "Reisebeschreibung nach Arabien und anderen umliegenden Ländern". - ''In volume II, p. 317 he [Niebuhr] begins his description of the journey from Beit el Fakih in the coffee mountains. This is accompanied by three engravings'' (Hünersdorff). There are some 40 other references to coffee in this work, including the journey from Sana'a to Mocha. The plates, the same as used for the first German language edition, include many views of cities, antiquities and statues, natives in traditional dress, hieroglyphs, Arabic script, musical instruments, a reception with the Iman of Sana'a (Yemen), and views of the mosque in Meshed Ali. The 31 maps and plans are of Constantinople, the Nile, Jeddah in the province of Mecca, Bombay, the palace of Persepolis, Muscat, the Arabian ("Persian") Gulf, Baghdad, Mosul, etc. Niebuhr's map of Yemen, the first exact map of the area ever, remained the standard for the next 200 years. - "The expedition had been proposed by the Hebrew scholar Johann David Michäelis of Göttingen for the purpose of illustrating certain passages of the Old Testament, and initially envisaged only a single traveller, possible an Arabic scholar. However, the idea rapidly blossomed into a fully-fledged scientific expedition. The team eventually assembled, for which there was no appointed leader, included Niebuhr as surveyor, along with Friedrich Christian von Haven, Peter Forskall, Christian Carl Kramer, Georg Baurenfeind, and a Swedish ex-soldier named Berggren" (Howgego). Carsten Niebuhr (1733-1815) was the sole survivor, and his work represents an important contribution to the study of the Middle East. - Bindings used. Large-margined copy of this famous account of the Middle East, Egypt, Persia, and India in fine condition. (more)
  ¶ Howgego I, N24. Hünersdorff, Coffee, p. 1081. Van Hulthem 15024. Nyon 21018. Tiele, Bibl. 796. Cf. Atabey 873-874. Cox I, pp. 237-238. Gay, Bibl. de l'Afrique et Arabe 3589. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1700. Carter, Robert A. Sea of Pearls, p. 116. Not in Atabey or Blackmer.
 

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226 Niebuhr, Carsten. Voyage en Arabie & en d'autres Pays circonvoisins. Tome premier (-second). Traduit de l'Allemand. Amsterdam & Utrecht, S. J. Baalde & Barthelemy Wild, 1775-1780. 4to. 2 vols. VIII, (6), 409, (1) pp. VI, (10), 389, (1) pp. With 2 engraved titles (in counted prelims.), 124 engraved plates (many folding), and folding map of Yemen (in partial colour). Contemp. full calf with gilt cover borders and giltstamped labels in red and green to fully gilt spine. Marbled endpapers. All edges red.
  € 6,000
First French edition, translated from the German ("Reisebeschreibung nach Arabien und anderen umliegenden Ländern", 1774) by F. L. Mourier. Title pages are dated 1776-80; colophones dated 1775-79. The famous account of the Royal Danish Expedition (1761-67) to the Middle East, Egypt, Persia and India, the first scientific expedition to this area. Niebuhr's "work on Arabia was the first European attempt at a complete account of Arabia, its people and their way of life. He amassed a vast quantity of factual information which he relates in a simple unrhetorical fashion, distinguishing clearly between things observed personally and things learned from others. The expedition, which lasted six years, was sponsored by the Danish king, and included the brilliant Swedish scientist, Peter Forsskal, who died while in Yemen" (Cat. Sotheby‘s, 13 Oct 98, lot 1010). Of the five scientists, Carsten Niebuhr (1733-1815) was the sole survivor, and his work represents an important contribution to the study of the Middle East. His map of the Yemen, the first exact map of the area ever, remained the standard for the next 200 years. - Old stamps erased from title pages (leaving insignificant waterstain), otherwise a perfect set in immaculate original French bindings. (more)
  ¶ Howgego I, N24 (p. 752). Weber II, 549. Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 66. Gay 3589. Van Hulthem 15024. Nyon 21018. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1700. Carter, Robert A. Sea of Pearls, p. 116. Not in Atabey or Blackmer.
 

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227 Norden, Frederik Ludvig. Travels in Egypt and Nubia. London, Davis, 1757. Large folio (295 x 479 mm). 2 vols. (12), XXXIV, 124 pp. (4), VIII, 155, (1) pp. With engr. frontispiece, engr. portrait, 19 engr. vignettes, 10 engr. initials, and 162 engravings on 161 plates. Modern half cloth.
  € 15,000
First English edition of one "of the earliest modern studies of Egypt" (Howgego). - "The first map of the Nile between Cairo and Derr based on autopsy, indicating all locales on the river banks" (cf. Henze). The engravings show views, landscapes, ruins, antiquities, plans, and maps. Plates numbered I through CLIX; plates XVI, XXII and XVII are followed by an unnumbered plate; illustrations CXL/CXLI and CXLII/CXLIII are printed from a single plate; no. CVIII is printed from two separate plates and is not joined to form a single illustration (thus counted as two plates). - Some edge repairs near beginning and end; several plates trimmed closely. All plates stamped "Birmingham Library". Endpapers show traces of a removed bookplate, as well as a later bookplate (apparently "Fritz Machac") in hieroglyphs. (more)
  ¶ Howgego I, N38. Weber II, 520. Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 74. Cox I, 382. Brunet IV, 101. Graesse IV, 687. OCLC 5716565. Cf. Gay 2169. Henze III, 622. Paulitschke 746. Blackmer 1212 (2 volumes in one).
 

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228 Ockley, Simon. The Conquest of Syria, Persia, and Aegypt, by the Saracens: containing the lives of Abubeker, Omar, and Othman, the immediate successors of Mahomet, giving an account of their most remarkable battles, sieges, &c. [...]. London, for R. Knaplock, J. Sprint, R. Smith, and J. Round, 1708. 8vo. XX, III-VIII, XI-XIV, (4), 391, (21) pp. Contemp panelled calf with giltstamped red label to gilt spine; leading edges gilt. Edges sprinkled in red.
  € 1,800
First edition of the author's most famous work. The orientalist Simon Ockley (1678-1720) was educated at Queens' College, Cambridge. He became fellow of Jesus College and vicar of Swavesey, and in 1711 was chosen Arabic professor of the university. His "'History of the Saracens' long enjoyed a great reputation; unfortunately Ockley took as his main authority a MS. in the Bodleian of Pseudo-Wakidi's 'Futúh al-Shám', which is rather historical romance than history. He also translated from the Arabic the Second Book of Esdras" (Enc. Brit.). A second volume appeared in 1718. - This copy includes 2 slightly different versions of the dedication to Henry Aldrich: the second, omitting his designation as 'One of Her Majesty's Chaplain in Ordinary', and containing other changes, is inserted in the preface. - Old ms. dates on t. p. Binding worn. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 1216. Gay 98. NYPL Arabia coll. 33. Diba Collection p. 209. OCLC 13745389. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula (later editions). Wilson 161 (ed. 1718). Brunet IV, 155 (3rd ed.).
 

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229 Ockley, Simon. The History of the Saracens. Containing the lives of [...] the immediate successors of Mahomet. Giving an account of their most remarkable battles, sieges, &c. particularly those of Aleppo, Antioch, Damascus, Alexandria, and Jerusalem. Illustrating the religion, rites, customs, and manner of living of that warlike people. The third edition. Cambridge, for Anne Ockley by permission of Henry Lintot, 1757. 8vo. 2 vols. (4), XXI, (29), 80, 339, (21) pp. (4), LVIII, 325, (3), (327)-356, (12) pp. With a folding engr. plate. Contemp. calf; modern spines with giltstamped labels. All edges red.
  € 950
Third edition of this classic and influential work, first published in 1708. Ockley (1678-1720) was Professor of Arabic at the University of Cambridge. "The importance of Ockley's work in relation to the progress of oriental studies cannot be overestimated [...] Ockley for the first time made the history of the early Saracen conquests attractive to the general reader, and stimulated the student to further research. [The 'History'] became a secondary classic, and formed for generations the main source of the average notions of early Mohammedan history" (DNB XLI, 364). The plate shows the Kaaba at Mecca, engraved after a drawing preserved in a manuscript in the Bodleian Library in Oxford. The manuscript, which formed the basis of Ockley's work, is now known as the ‘Futûh esh-Sham by pseudo-Waqidi. - Browned and brownstained throughout. From the library of the British philosopher of religion, David Arthur Pailin (b. 1936), with his bookplate; also with engr. bookplate of Robert Fellowes (of Shotesham/Shottesham, Norfolk, d. 1869?). (more)
  ¶ BM 174, p. 334. Gay 98. Graesse V, 7. OCLC 6595742. Cf. NYPL Arabia coll. 33 (1st and later editions).
 

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230 [Oman] - Bureau International de la Cour Permanente d'Arbitrage. Recueil des actes et protocoles concernant le differend entre la France et la Grande Bretagne à propos des boutres de Mascate [...]. Den Haag, Van Langenhuysen frères, 1905. Small folio. 81 pp. Contemp. half cloth with printed boards as issued.
  € 850
A document of Anglo-French foreign relations during the early years of the "Entente cordiale": the official protocol of arbitration regarding the question whether France was entitled to authorize Oman dhows to fly the French flag. - In good condition. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 23389438.
 

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231 [Oman]. Documents diplomatiques. Affaires de Mascate. Commerce des armes à Mascate 1912-1914. Paris, Imprimerie Nationale, 1914. Folio. VI, 63 pp. Publisher's original printed wrappers.
  € 1,500
French diplomatic correspondence and documents pertaining to the arms trade and French security interests in Oman, then predominated by British policy. Published by the French Ministère des Affaires Étrangères. In excellent condition. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 60692526.
 

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All the Bedouin tribes
232 Oppenheim, Max von. Die Beduinen. Leipzig, Harrassowitz, 1939-1968. Large 4to. 5 vols. (vol. 4 bound in 2 fascicles). With 3 frontispieces, 32 plates, 8 folding maps and 4 folding genealogical tables. Original green wrappers.
  € 3,500
First edition of this standard work of reference, almost never encountered complete as thus with all volumes, including the index published three decades after the inception of the work. The definitive monograph on the history and culture of the Bedouin tribes. "The present book constitutes the result of forty years of toil and personal research throughout Arabia" (preface, transl.). - A very good, clean copy. (more)
  ¶ Henze III, 650. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1720 (vols. 1-3 only). pkpk
 

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The best edition: an immaculate copy
233 Ortelius (Oertel), Hieronymus. Ortelius redivivus et continuatus, oder der Ungarischen Kriegs-Empörungen historische Beschreibung [...]. Frankfurt and Nuremberg, Daniel Fievet für Paul Fürst, 1665. Folio (220 x 357 mm). 2 parts in 1 vol. (10), 431, (13), (12), 362, (20) pp., final blank. Both title pages printed in red and black. With separate engr. title page, large folding map, 49 (instead of 40!) portrait plates (of which 13 contain 9 portraits each), 54 engr. views or battle scenes (1 folding), and 2 small folding maps. Contemp. vellum with ms. title to spine.
  € 8,500
Third (and final), most extensive edition of this principal work on the history of the Turkish wars. This encompassing contemporary chronicle had first been published in 1602. Contains views of the sieges and battles of all principal cities and the portraits of all warlords involved on both sides. Includes nine portrait plates more than required by Nebehay/Wagner. Occasional insignificant browning and fingerstaining, but in uncommonly good condition throughout. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 23:323431G. Nebehay/W. 464. Németh H 1540. Sturminger 300. Hampe, Fürst, p. 123.
 

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Inscribed by the author
234 (Osgood, Joseph Barlow Felt). Notes of Travel or Recollections of Majunga, Zanzibar, Muscat, Aden, Mocha, and other Eastern Ports. Salem, Mass., (Ives & Pease for) George Creamer, 1854. 8vo. X, 253, (1) pp. Original blindstamped red cloth with giltstamped title to spine.
  € 3,500
Rare first edition of this travel memoir of Madagascar, Sansibar, Oman, and Yemen, which devotes much attention to the customs of the population of the Arabian peninsula. Privately printed by the author's father-in-law in only 300 copies. Reprinted in 1972. - Some browning and foxing throughout as common; top spine-end chipped. Inscribed by the 85-year-old author on the flyleaf: "Feb. 12, 1909. With regards of Joseph B. F. Osgood, Salem, Essex Co, Mass.". The jurist Osgood, born in 1823 into a family of mariners, was mayor of Salem during the Civil War. He married Mary Jane Creamer in 1853. - The Burrell copy fetched £1,495 at Sotheby's in 1999; the Quentin Keynes copy was knocked down for £1,100 in 2004 at Christie's, and the Winterton copy (in a later binding) commanded £1,560 at Sotheby's in 2003; no copy signed by the author is listed in auction records. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 4427641. Not in Gay. Not in Macro. pkpk
 

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235 Owen, Roderic. The Golden Bubble. Arabian Gulf Documentary. London, Collins, 1957. 8vo. 255, (1) pp. With 13 photo illustrations and a map. Original red publisher's cloth with giltstamped spine title. Original dustjacket.
  € 1,500
First printing of the first edition. A documentary of a year spent by the author in the Arabian Gulf, discussing Bahrain, Abu Dhabi, Buraimi Oasis, Qatar, Kuwait; hunting and falconry. Dedicated "to the honour and glory of His Excellency Sheikh Shakhbut bin Sultan Albufalah, Ruler of Abu Dhabi". - Now rare. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 1239299. Not in Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula.
 

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236 Pardoe, [Julia]. The Beauties of the Bosphorus. London, Virtue & Co., [1840]. Small folio. (4), XII, (3)-172 pp. With engr. portrait frontispiece, engr. title page, 85 steel engravings (after William H. Bartlett) and 1 map. Splendid contemp. giltstamped green morocco with fillets, dentelle border, and a central pointillé ornament adorned with flower buds. Spine, leading edges and inner dentelle attractively gilt. All edges gilt.
  € 1,200
Third edition. - The British travel writer Julia S. H. Pardoe (1806-62), who, suffering from consumption, had been taken south early in her youth, accompanied her father to Constantinople in 1835 and was famous for her literary reports on Portugal and the Near East even as a child. "Since Lady Mary Wortley Montagu probably no woman has acquired so intimate a knowledge of Turkey [... Her] works, written [...] in a pleasant and graceful style, attracted a large share of notice, and, as popular history, may still be read with pleasure" (DNB). - First published in 1838 with only 78 plates; later editions were published under the title "Picturesque Europe" (1854 and 1874). The pretty views are engraved after William Henry Bartlett (1809-54), whose series of oriental and American topography were then very popular (cf. Thieme/B. II, 554). - Occasionally slightly browned or foxed (more so in four plates). Binding insignificantly rubbed at corners and raised bands, otherwise very nicely preserved. (more)
  ¶ BLC 246, 438. DNB 15, 201, 5. Cf. Aboussouan 711 (first ed. 1838). Weber I, 1151 (1850).
 

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The Venetian Merchant's Pocketbook
237 Pasi, Bartolomeo di. Tariffa de i pesi, e misure corrispondenti dal Levante al Ponente: e da una terra, e luogo allaltro, quasi p tutte le parti dil mondo: con la dichiaratione, e notificatione di tutte le robbe: che si tragono di uno paese per laltro con la sua tavola copiosissima, e facilissima a trovare ogni cosa per ordine. Venice, P. de Sabbio, 1540. 8vo. (12), 200 ff. Title with architectural woodcut border. Brown morocco (signed "Masson-Debonelle") with gilt title to spine, leading edges and inner dentelle gilt. All edges gilt.
  € 12,000
An early merchants' guide to the measurements of the Mediterranean and Near East, this pocketbook for sixteenth-century Italian traders is one of the foremost sources for the study of the metrologies of Venice and her trading partners in the early sixteenth century. It enabled conversion between Venetian currency, weights and measures and units of other Italian city-states, European neighbours and more exotic locations in the Levant, North Africa, the Near and Middle East, including Constantinople, Aleppo, Tripoli, Damascus, Cyprus, Corfu, Rhodes, and Crete. Pasi's manual is invaluable as a record of the panoply of commodities traded in the Mediterranean at the beginning of the sixteenth century, including pearls, silks, wool, saffron, chestnuts, figs, galangal, vegetable oils, gold and silver. On fols. 3, 11, and 12, Pasi recorded the tariffs on pearls in Damascus, Aleppo, Cairo, Alexandria, Constantinople and Venice. It is very likely that the famous merchant Balbi carried a copy of this classic with him on his travels. First printed in Venice in 1503, and again in 1521, this 1540 edition appears to be the third and was followed by another in 1557. - An excellent clean copy in a charming French binding. Very rare: the only copy of any edition to surface at auction within the last thirty years appears to be the Honeyman copy of the 1503 edition. (more)
  ¶ Kress 51. Adams P 374. Smith, Rara Arithmetica, 79. Cf. Goldsmiths' 7 (1503 edition). R. A. Donkin, Beyond price. Pearls and pearl fishing: origins to the age of discoveries (Philadelphia, 1998), p. 138. pkpk
 

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Indulgence for the War against the Ottomans, printed on vellum
238 Peraudi, Raimundus. Indulgentia 1487. [For promoting the war against the Turks and for the restoration of the Cathedral of Saintes]. [Cologne, Johann Koelhoff the Elder, 1487]. 1 p. Printed broadside on vellum, c. 145 x 210 mm, 25 lines.
  € 18,000
Extremely rare indulgence printed on vellum. It was granted on 25 March 1487 to "Johannes le Bribsot Johanna uxor eius" (on verso also "Jehan le Bribsotte"), possibly from Namur (Fredericq: "afkomstig uit het land van Namen?"): "Universis presentes liutteras inspecturis Raymondus Peraudi, sacre pagine professor, [...] salutem. Notum facimus quod felicis recordationis dominus Sixtus, divina providentia papa quartus, [...] in perpetuum participes fieri. Cum itaque devoti in Christo [Johannes le Bribsot & Johanna uxor ejus] ad ipsius fidei piam observationem ... constat esse concessum [...] Forma absolutionis [...]". - The name is repeated on the reverse by the same hand that filled in the form: "Jehan le Bribsotte". - The French Augustinian and Cardinal Raymond Peraudi (1435-1505), a papal legate, was the French commissar for indulgences and official preacher for a crusade against the Turks in Germany and Northern Europe. He was created bishop of Gurk (Carinthia) in 1491, and later served as bishop of Saintes. - In very good condition. Only five copies recorded, of which one is merely a fragment and only two are printed on vellum. (more)
  ¶ GW M30687. Ohly-Sack 2225. Polain 2699 (this copy). VE 15 P-74 (erroneously listing this copy under P-73). ISTC no. ip00261255. P. Fredericq, Codex documentorum sacratissimarum indulgentiarum Neerlandicarum (1300-1600), [1922], p. 313 no. 232. Not in Goff, BMC, BnF, BSB Munich, IDL etc.
 

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239 [Persian Telegraph]. Goldsmid, Frederic John. Telegraph and Travel. A Narrative of the Formation and Development of Telegraphic Communication Between England and India, [...] With Incidental Notices of the Countries Traversed by the Lines. London, Macmillan & Co., 1874. 8vo. XIV, 673, (1) pp. With wood-engraved title vignette, folding map of the Middle East, 3 maps, 4 wood-engraved plates, 1 steel-engraved portrait, and numerous wood-engraved text illustrations. Contemp. half calf with giltstamped spine title. Marbled edges and endpapers.
  € 2,800
Fascinating account of the work on the submarine telegraph lines from British India to Turkish Arabia, the so-called "Persian Gulf Cable" laid in the 1860s. An extensive section is devoted to the laying of cables in the Arabian Gulf south of Persia, with a separate diagram of the diversion of the "Persian Gulf Cable" from Elphinstone Island off the northern tip of Arabia to Henjam and Jask. The telegraph lines ultimately reached from London via Munich, Vienna, Constantinople, Diarbekr, and Baghdad to Basrah, then continued by the Indian Government to Bushehr, Henjam, Gwdar and Karachi as well as to Tehran. Other cables connected Cairo with Aden and thence with Bombay. - Some brownstaining and edge flaws, otherwise an excellent copy. Inscribed "Thomas Kirk Johnson Dec. 1876 From R. B. Hull". (more)
  ¶ Howgego III, G31. OCLC 1283945.
 

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240 [Persian Telegraph]. East India (Persian Telegraph). Return showing the outlay by the Government of India on the lines of telegraph in Persia, in the Persian Gulf, and in the Arabian Sea; and, showing the revenue and expenditure of these lines since their opening in February 1868. [London], 1868. Folio. (4) pp. Disbound.
  € 250
From the House of Commons parliamentary papers, vol. 50 (1867-68), no. 343. Answer to a parliamentary enquiry into the expenditure and revenue of the recently opened telegraph lines which connected Britain with the Indian Empire via Egypt. (more)
 

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241 [Pfeiffer, Ida]. Reise einer Wienerin in das heilige Land. Dritte verbesserte Auflage. Vienna, Jakob Dirnböck, 1846. 8vo. 2 vols. in one. VIII, (2), 139, 202 pp. With double-page coloured lithogr. plate. Contemp. cloth.
  € 350
Third edition, the last one to be published anonymously. - Ida Pfeiffer (1797-1858) from Vienna was one of the first women to travel the world, an enterprise she financed through her travel descriptions. She saw Constantinople, Brussa, Beirut, Jaffa, Jerusalem, Jordan and the Dead Sea, Nazareth, Damascus, Baalbek and Lebanon, Alexandria, Cairo, the desert and the Red Sea before returning via Malta, Sicily, Naples, and Rome. Published anonymously, the book was an immense and immediate success; not until the 1856 fourth edition did the author affix her name to the title. - Slight brownstaining throughout due to paper. Ms. ownership "Elisa Rösch" (dated 1876) to flyleaf; latterly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. The fine coloured frontispiece shows the author writing amidst a scene of Bedouins and camels. (more)
  ¶ Holzmann/B. III, 11495. ÖBL VIII, 32. Lit. in Österreich 3005. Cf. Howgego II, P25. Röhricht 1842. Tobler 165. Wurzbach XXII, 182. Henze IV, 94.
 

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242 Philby, Harry St John Bridger. Collection of Nine of H. St John Philby's Works in their First Editions, 1928-64. London & New York, Constable, Holt, Hale, etc., 1928-1964. Nine 8vo volumes in good to very good condition, four with original dustjackets. Many plates, folding maps, etc.
  € 2,500
Arabia of the Wahhabis (London: Constable, 1928), with large and detailed coloured folding map of Riyadh and its surroundings. The Empty Quarter (New York: Holt, 1933) with large coloured folding maps. Sheba's Daughters: Being A Record of Travel in Southern Arabia (London: Methuen, 1939) with maps and plates. A Pilgrim in Arabia (London: Hale, 1946), first edition for popular circulation in original dustjcaket. Arabian Days: An Autobiography (London: Hale, 1948), second impression of the first edition. Arabian Highlands (Cornell University Press, 1952), with dustjacket in very good condition. Arabian Jubilee (London: Hale, 1952), dedicated to Ibn Sa'ud with frontispiece portrait the ruler. Sa'udi Arabia (London: Benn, 1955), Philby's history of the formation of the Arabian state. Original dustjacket in poor condition. Arabian Oil Ventures (Washington: The Middle East Institute, 1964), "the story of how the oil concession of Saudi Arabia was made, from [the author's] own intimate view as participant in the negotiations". - St John Philby (1885-1960), also known by his Arabian name "Sheikh Abdullah", was an Arabist, explorer, writer, and British colonial office intelligence officer. Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, he studied oriental languages and was a friend and classmate of Jawaharlal Nehru, later prime Minister of India. Philby settled in Jeddah and became famous as an international writer and explorer. He personally mapped on camelback what is now the Saudi-Yemeni border on the Rub' al Khali; in 1932, while searching for the lost city of Ubar, he was the first westerner to visit and describe the Wabar craters. At this time, Philby also became Ibn Sa'ud's chief adviser in dealing with the British Empire and Western powers. He converted to Islam in 1930. The personal contacts between the United States and Saudi Arabia were largely channeled through the person of Philby. (more)
 

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243 Philby, Harry St John Bridger. Rub' al Khali: An account of explorations in the Great South Desert of Arabia under the auspices and patronage of His Majesty 'Abdul 'Aziz ibn Sa'ud, King of the Hejaz and Nejd and its Dependencies. [London], The Royal Geographic Society, 1933. 26 pp., folding map. Blue printed wrappers. 8vo.
  € 200
Vivid description by the famous Arabist Harry St. John Philby, also known as Sheikh Abdullah, about his travels through Rub Al-Khali, one of the largest sand deserts in the world. Includes a plan of Al Hadida (Wabar) and various black-and-white photographs taken during the expedition. A detailed map at the end of the booklet shows the Rub al Khali and the sourrounding areas. - Some damage to rear cover; otherwise in good condition. (more)
  ¶ Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1798.
 

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244 [Philby, Harry St John Bridger]. Iraq in War Time. Al-Iraq fi zaman al-harb. Basrah, Government Press, [1918]. Folio (257 x 344 mm). (104) pp. More than 200 photo prints. Original giltstamped green cloth.
  € 8,500
Intriguing photo publication of both Iraq and Central Arabia during the Great War, brought out by St John Philby at the end of the year 1918, after he had served with the British administration in Baghdad from 1915 to 1917 and then travelled through the interior of the Arabian peninsula as head of a mission to Ibn Saud. Philby completed a great tour of the Nejd in nine months, covering some 4000 kilometres. "Over 600 photographs were taken, some of which were later published in 1918 in 'Iraq in War Time', the first photographic book to appear on Najd" (Badr El-Hage, p. 95f.). The book, captioned throughout in English and Arabic (in which Philby was fluent) is divided into four sections: "Groups and Portraits" (43 illustrations); "Local Events" (55 illustrations); "Views" (112 illustrations, including "In Basrah City", "Amarah", "Nasiriyah", "Baghdad", "Najaf", "Mosul", "Suq al Shuyukh", "In Persia"), and "A Tour through Central Arabia" (24 illustrations). Among these are numerous equestrian images ("The best Arab horse 'Winchester' owned by Fahud el Nasar", "Well-known Basrah Race Horses", "Arabs competing for a prize offered for the best Arab mare", "Judging the Arab mares", "Winner of the Prize for Arab Mares" etc.), and the portrait section contains a veritable gallery of the sheikhs and political officers of the Arabian scene during the Great War. The tour of the Nejd shows fascinating images of Jeddah, Nafudh, Sakha, Madhiq, Riyadh, Al-Hafar, Saqtah Gorge, the Shamsiyah Garden, etc., as well as Arab chiefs and a group portrait with the anonymous tourist Philby himself, surrounded by his Bedouin escort. "Although Philby was an amateur photographer, and the quality of his photographs fails at times to be up to standard, his achievements were remarkable, and his photographs documented many towns and villages for the first time" (Badr El-Hage, p. 114). - Cover slightly rubbed and faded at lower edge; interior clean. A good copy of this rare and important work. (more)
  ¶ Badr El-Hage, Saudi Arabia: Caught in Time, 1861-1939, p. 95. Imperial War Museum 29(567)/3-5. OCLC 757755425. Not in Macro or Wilson.
 

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245 Chronographus, Philo. Arca Temporum Mundi Reserata, Oder: Der Welt eröffnete Zeit- und Geschicht-Beschreibung. Begreiffend: Perspeculatum [...]. Augsburg, Jakob Koppmayer for Jakob Enderlin, 1693. Folio (305 x 190 mm). 2 parts in 1 volume. (4), 31, (1), 64 pp. With 12 (instead of 16) plates containing 24 copper engravings. Modern boards.
  € 4,800
Fascinating, little-received chronographical study focusing on the history of the Eastern Mediterranean and Asia Minor, then under Ottoman rule. The anonymous late 17th-century German author hides behind the name of "Philo Chronographus" and is evidently identical with the "Philo Cosmographus" who produced the similarly themed geographical work, "Trinum Marinum", which is announced on the title page and was often issued together with this, though produced by a different publisher and catalogued separately. The first part of the work contains a general introduction which relates the 24 hours of the day to the time from Creation to the year 1800 (which is conceived of as the end of the world, leaving another mere 107 years of history to come!). The second part features a chronicle of the "Rule of the Ottoman Porte", from Sultan Osman to Suleyman II. - Numerous pages of plates (each page containing two copper engravings) depict costumes, animals and plants, maps and views of towns (Sultan Osman, the Ottoman Residence and a view of Constantinople, dolphins and cranes, Turkish ladies in their various garments, a cypress and a mastix tree, etc.). - The number of plates, and indeed even the arrangement of engravings on a single page, varies from copy to copy, but this wants 4 plates as compared to the table of plates. Well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 12:645730N. Weller, Pseud. 439.
 

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246 Cosmographus, Philo. Trinum Marinum: oder: Die an einander hangende Drey Meer Pontus Euxinus, Propontis, cum Archipelago: oder: Das Schwartze, Weisse, und Egeische Meer. Augsburg, Anton Nepperschmid for Jakob Enderlin, 1693. Folio (305 x 190 mm). (2), 61, (1) pp. Title page printed in red and black. With 11 (instead of 18?) plates containing 22 copper engravings. Modern boards.
  € 5,000
Fascinating, little-received geographical study focusing on the Eastern Mediterranean and Asia Minor, then under Ottoman rule. The anonymous late 17th-century German author hides behind the name of "Philo Cosmographus" and is evidently identical with the "Philo Chronographus" who produced the similarly themed chronographical work, "Arca Temporum", which was often issued together with this, though produced by a different publisher and catalogued separately. The present work features an overview of the geography of the Ottoman Empire, including the Aegean, the Sea of Marmara, and the Black Sea region - the "three seas" to which the title refers. Numerous pages of plates (each page containing two copper engravings) depict maps and views as well as animals (a hyena and sheep, Iraklion and Chania, Nauplia, Koroni, Rhodes, Thessaloniki, Belgrade, Izmir, etc.). - The number of plates, and indeed even the arrangement of engravings on a single page, varies from copy to copy, but this wants 8 plates as compared to the table of plates provided in "Arca Temporum". Occasional inkstains, but well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 7:688727L; 3:605737C. Weller, Pseud. 439.
 

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247 Picart, Bernard. Histoire générale des cérémonies, moeurs, et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde. Paris, Rollin fils, 1741. Folio (305 x 455 mm). 7 vols. All title pages printed in red and black. With engr. frontispiece, 7 engr. title-vignettes, numerous engr. head- and tailpieces and initials, and 243 plates. Contemp. half calf; spine elaborated gilt with double giltstamped red labels.
  € 8,500
A perfectly preserved tall paper copy of this beautifully illustrated ethnographic work on the world's religions. Despite condemnation by the Catholic church, the publication was a resounding success. "'Ceremonies and customs' prepared the ground for religious toleration amid seemingly unending religious conflict, and demonstrated the impact of the global on Western consciousness [...] as it shaped the development of a modern, secular understanding of religion" (Hunt). - Based on the author's "Cérémonies et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde" (Amsterdam, 1723-1743), the text is corrected (and sometimes entirely revised) from the original edition. The plates are mostly repeated from the Dutch publication, but the vignettes are engraved in Paris (by Duflos and others). Also contains descriptions of irreligious customs, such as the Adamites, Flagellants, etc. - Bindings a little rubbed, a bit browned in places, otherwise an excellent and unusually wide-margined complete copy in uniform bindings with elaborately gilt spines. (more)
  ¶ Brunet I, 1743. Graesse II, 104. Cf. L. Hunt, The Book That Changed Europe: Picart & Bernard's Religious Ceremonies Of The World (Harvard UP, 2010). Lipperheide Oc 24. Hiler 708. Cohen/R. 134. Sander 1548. Lewine 414.
 

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248 Pientini, Angelo. Alcorano riprovato nel quale si mostra le falsita' della setta macomettana, et l'ingannevoli astuzie del suo avatore. Diviso in cinque libri. Florence, Giunti, 1603. 4to. (8), 371, (11) pp. Near-contemporary half leather with giltstamped spine.
  € 2,500
Scarce second edition of this critical discussion of the Qur'an, a treatise by the the Dominican theologian Pientini (d. 1589) directed against Islam and the Prophet. - Slight edge defects and worming to first leaves; some browning and waterstaining, otherwise a good copy. Much rarer than the 1588 original edition (with identical collation), published by Marescotti under the title "Delle demostrationi degli errori setta Macomettana libri quinque". (more)
  ¶ ICCU BVEE\046275. Cf. Edit 16, CNCE 29089 ("Delle demostrationi degli errori della setta macomettana libri cinque", 1588).
 

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249 Pitts, Joseph. A Faithful Account of the Religion and Manners of the Mahometans [...] The fourth edition, corrected, with additions, a map of Mecca, and a cut of the gestures of the Mahometans in their worship. London, for T. Londman and R. Hett, 1738. 8vo. XXIV, 259 (but: 261), (3) pp. With an engr. folding plate (wants the map). Contemp. calf with remains of giltstamped cover fillets.
  € 750
Fourth edition; first published in 1704. - The young sailor Joseph Pitts (1663-1735?), with the rest of the crew of his ship, was captured off the coast of Spain by Algerian pirates in 1678. The Algerians took the crew as their prize, sank the ship, then repeated this tactic with several other vessels before sailing on to the city of Algier, where the majority of the captives were sold as slaves at public auction. Pitts spent more than fifteen years in captivity, serving three successive owners, with whom he travelled to Cairo and Alexandria, as well as to the sacred Islamic sites at Mecca and Medina. Unlike many English captives, Pitts was never ransomed by a British consul. After his escape from Smyrna in 1693, it took him nearly a year to return to his native Exeter. "A keen observer, Joseph Pitts is anxious to correct factual errors in earlier Westerners' reports of Mecca and Medina. However, he is not without significant religious and chauvinistic bias, and bears great personal enmity toward his captors. His narrative is not a straightforward memoir, but a curious mix of forms, including the travelogue, spiritual autobiography, captivity narrative, and military commentary on various regions' garrisons, tactics, and capabilities. Part of Pitts's authority as an observer comes from a source that is largely concealed from the reader until the book's second-to-last chapter - during his captivity, Pitts converted from Christianity to the practices of Islam" (Norton Anthology). - Some browning throughout, with occasional insignificant edge defects. Modern endpapers; wants the engraved map. The plate (wrinkled and rebacked) shows the "various gestures of the Mahometans in their prayers to God". From the library of the British philosopher of religion, David Arthur Pailin (b. 1936), with his bookplate. The Burrell copy of the first edition commanded £6,000 at Sotheby's in 1999. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin XII, 1327. OCLC 1440961. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1816 (1731 third ed.). Howgego I, P107. Cf. Heritage Library, Islamic Treasures, s. v. travels (1704 ed., illustration). pkpk
 

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The earliest and "by far the most detailed account of the coast of the United Arab Emirates"
250 Plinius Secundus, Gaius. Historia naturalis. Venice, Paolo Manuzio, 1558-1559. Folio (208 x 284 mm). 2 pts. in 1 vol. (28) pp., 976 cols., (36) pp. (132) pp. With woodcut Aldine device on title page. Contemp. limp vellum.
  € 12,500
The only Aldine folio edition of Pliny's famous enyclopedic work, covering the entire field of ancient knowledge. With his "Natural History", Pliny gives a mathematical and physical description of the world, discusses geography, ethnography, anthropology, human physiology, zoology, botany, mineralogy, sculpture and painting. As "a purveyor of information both scientific and nonscientific, Pliny holds a place of exceptional importance in the tradition and diffusion of culture" (DSB). Through the present work Pliny "gives us by far the most detailed account of the coast of the United Arab Emirates that has come down to us. Chapter 32 of Book 6 (§ 149-152), beginning near the Qatar peninsula, proceeds to describe the Emirates islands, tribes, and coast right up to the Musandam peninsula, before continuing on south along the coast of Oman. As such, it is a mine of invaluable information on the UAE in the late pre-Islamic era" (UAE History: 2000 to 200 years ago - http://www.uaeinteract.com/history/e_walk/con_3/con3_15.asp). Pliny "completed his 'Natural History' in 77 AD and, to judge from his account of the peoples and places of south-eastern Arabia [...], the area of the UAE was full of settlements, tribes, and physical features, the names of which he recorded for posterity" (Ghareeb/Al Abed 54). Beautifully printed by the humanist Paolo Manuzio (1512-74), son of the great Aldus Manutius and master of the famous Venice printshop since 1533, in that house's handsome signature Italics. - A few contemporary ink underlinings. Some brownstaining to margins; occasional worming near end; a paper fault to fol. Siii professionally repaired. Contemporary ms. ownership "Ascanii Peroni de Populo", with another, somewhat later owner's note, on title page. (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 28055. Adams P 1575. BM-STC Italian 526.
 

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First English edition of the earliest and "by far the most detailed account of the coast of the United Arab Emirates"
251 Plinius Secundus, Gaius. [Historia naturalis in English]. The Historie of the World. Commonly called, The Naturall Historie of C. Plinius Secundus. Translated into English by Philemon Holland Doctor of Physicke. London, Adam Islip, 1601. Folio (224 x 320 mm). 2 vols. (58), 614, (42) pp. (12), 632, (86) pp. Woodcut printer's device to both title pages. Beautiful 19th-c. marbled half morocco with giltstamped red and green spine labels.
  € 18,000
The first complete English edition of Pliny's famous enyclopedic work, covering the entire field of ancient knowledge. With his Natural History, Pliny gives a mathematical and physical description of the world, discussing geography, ethnography, anthropology, human physiology, zoology, botany, mineralogy, sculpture and painting. As "a purveyor of information both scientific and nonscientific, Pliny holds a place of exceptional importance in the tradition and diffusion of culture" (DSB). Through the present work Pliny "gives us by far the most detailed account of the coast of the United Arab Emirates that has come down to us. Chapter 32 of Book 6 (§ 149-152), beginning near the Qatar peninsula, proceeds to describe the Emirates islands, tribes, and coast right up to the Musandam peninsula, before continuing on south along the coast of Oman. As such, it is a mine of invaluable information on the UAE in the late pre-Islamic era" (UAE History: 2000 to 200 years ago - http://www.uaeinteract.com/history/e_walk/con_3/con3_15.asp). Pliny "completed his 'Natural History' in 77 AD and, to judge from his account of the peoples and places of south-eastern Arabia [...], the area of the UAE was full of settlements, tribes, and physical features, the names of which he recorded for posterity" (Ghareeb/Al Abed 54). - Pliny's great work first appeared in English in 1566, though merely in a translation of Pierre de Changi's French abridgement, which covered only the first sixteen books. The entire text was first rendered into English by Philemon Holland, that indefatigable translator of the classics whom Thomas Further called the "translator generall of his age" (quoted in DNB); this was his most popular translation (cf. Norman). - Endpapers restored; contemporary ownership of James Barker on title page. Professionally repaired paper flaw in middle of fol. C4, vol. 2. A very good, clean copy from the library of William Beebe (1877-1962), an important American naturalist, author and explorer, with his bookplates. (more)
  ¶ Cushing P 319. Norman Library 1719. Pforzheimer 496. DSB XI, pp. 38-40. Osler 313. Wellcome 5127. E. Ghareeb and I. Al Abed, United Arab Emirates: A New Perspective, London 2001, pp. 54-58. pkpk
 

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Finely bound set from an Irish noble library
252 Pococke, Richard. A Description of the East, and Some other Countries. London, W. Bowyer for the author, 1743-1745. Royal folio (416 x 253 mm). 3 pts. in 2 vols. With 3 engr. title vignettes, engr. dedication in vol. 2, and 178 engr. plates, views, and maps (some folding). Somewhat later red calf with giltstamped label to elaborately gilt spine. Leading edges gilt. Marbled endpapers.
  € 25,000
First edition; very rare. "[A work of] superior learning and dignity" (Gibbon, Decline and Fall, ch. 11, n. 69). The first German translation appeared at Erlangen in 1754/55; French and Dutch translations followed soon. "Pococke travelled extensively in Europe from 1733-36 and continued on to the Levant, reaching Alexandria in September 1737. He remained three years in the Eastern Mediterranean, visiting Egypt, Palestine, Asia Minor and Greece. His book describes these journeys but not necessarily in chronological order. The plates of antiquities are after drawings by Pococke himself [...] Pococke achieved a great reputation with this publication; the work was very popular during his lifetime and was praised by Gibbon" (Blackmer). "The quality and particularly the earliness of his observations and their record in prose, maps, and diagrams make him one of the most important near eastern travellers, ranking with Frederik Ludvig Norden and Carsten Niebuhr, in stimulating an Egyptian revival in European art and architecture, and recording much that has subsequently been lost" (DNB). - Finely bound set showing very little rubbing; hinges beginning to split or very slightly loosened. One plate shows a large tear; otherwise immaculate. From the library of the Irish nobleman Edward Garth-Turnour, 1st Earl Winterton (1734-88), with his autograph ownership to flyleaf (dated 1778). Later in the collection of the country squire Charles Benjamin Caldwell (1809-96) of New Grange, County Meath (his bookplate on front pastedown). (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 1323. Tobler 127f. Nissen, ZBI 3206. pkpk
 

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253 Preziosi, [Amadeo]. Souvenir du Caire. Paris, Lemercier, 1862. Large folio (565 x 430 mm). 20 chromolithogr. mounted plates and 2 ff. (title page and table of contents). Original cloth, rebound.
  € 28,000
First edition of Preziosi's stunning series of colour lithographs. "These attractive plates illustrate the costumes of Cairo and the valley of the Nile, which Preziosi visited in 1862" (Blackmer). - Binding somewhat rubbed. Some foxing to backing cardboards, some marginal waterstaining to final two plates (not affecting image). Overall still a good copy. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 1352. Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 135. Lipperheide Ma 34. Colas 2424. Not in Atabey.
 

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254 Prideaux, Humphrey. The True Nature of Imposture, Fully Display'd in the Life of Mahomet [...]. The Sixth Edition, corrected. London, for E. Curll, J. Hooke and T. Caldecott, 1716. 8vo. XII, (2), 286 pp. Contemp. calf. All edges sprinkled in red.
  € 700
6th edition of this "often reprinted" (DNB) treatise, first published in 1697. Its scholarship depended in particular on Pococke. "Prideaux's literary reputation rests on his ‘Life of Mahomet’ (1697) [... of which] the story has been told that the bookseller to whom he offered the manuscript said he ‘could wish there were a little more humour in it.’ No sign of humour was ever shown by Prideaux, except in his proposal (26 Nov. 1715) for a hospital in each university, to be called ‘Drone Hall,’ for useless fellows and students. The ‘Life of Mahomet’ was in fact pointed as a polemical tract against the deists. [...] Some of its errors were noted by Sale in the discourse and notes to his translation of the ‘Koran,’ 1734" (ibid.). From the library of the British philosopher of religion, David Arthur Pailin (b. 1936), with his bookplate and notes laid in. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin XI, 658. Cf. DNB 46, 353. Gay 3623 (1st. ed.).
 

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255 Prideaux, Humphrey. The True Nature of Imposture, Fully Display'd in the Life of Mahomet [...]. The Seventh Edition, corrected. London, for E. Curll, J. Hooke, W. Mears, and F. Clay, 1718. 8vo. XIII, (3), 200 pp. Contemp. blindstamped calf (spine rebacked; giltstamped red spine label).
  € 650
7th edition of this "often reprinted" (DNB) treatise, first published in 1697. Its scholarship depended in particular on Pococke. "Prideaux's literary reputation rests on his ‘Life of Mahomet’ (1697) [... of which] the story has been told that the bookseller to whom he offered the manuscript said he ‘could wish there were a little more humour in it.’ No sign of humour was ever shown by Prideaux, except in his proposal (26 Nov. 1715) for a hospital in each university, to be called ‘Drone Hall,’ for useless fellows and students. The ‘Life of Mahomet’ was in fact pointed as a polemical tract against the deists. [...] Some of its errors were noted by Sale in the discourse and notes to his translation of the ‘Koran,’ 1734" (ibid.). From the library of the British philosopher of religion, David Arthur Pailin (b. 1936), with his bookplate. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin XI, 658. Cf. Gay 3623 (1st. ed.).
 

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Coloured de luxe issue
256 Prisse d'Avennes, Achille Constant Théodore Émile. Oriental Album. Characters, Costumes, and Modes of life, in the valley of the Nile. London, James Madden, 1848. Folio (382 x 522 mm). (6), 60 pp. With mounted chromolithographed additional decorative title heightened with gold, tinted lithographed portrait, and 30 hand-coloured lithographs. Numerous wood-engraved illustrations in the text. Contemp. red half morocco with giltstamped cover and spine title. All edges gilt. Marbled endpapers. Modern calf-backed marbled boards, spine gilt with morocco label.
  € 75,000
First edition. Only a small portion of the press run - as the present copy - was coloured by hand, providing the utmost detail and atmosphere to the splendid plates showing bedouins, horses, local life and costumes. One of the most sought-after and earliest publications by Prisse d'Avennes, who spent many years in Egypt after 1826, first as an engineer in the service of Mehmet Ali. After 1836 he explored Egypt disguised as an Arab, using the name Edris Effendi; during this period he carried out archaeological excavations in the valley of the Nile. In 1848 he first published his "Oriental Album". This unusual visual collection of "characters, costumes and modes of life in the valley of the Nile" is augmented by a commentary by the renowned orientalist and Egyptologist James Augustus St. John. - The frontispiece portrait depicts the artist's friend George Lloyd in the robes of a sheikh reclining with a hookah, and camels in the background. Lloyd, a botanist accompanying the expedition, accidentally shot himself whilst cleaning a rifle. - Final plate with a few minor repairs to margins; final leaf creased and with marginal repairs. One or two other minor marginal defects. - While normal copies of the first edition regularly appear in the trade or at auctions, the present coloured de luxe issue with all the plates is quite rare. The Atabey copy fetched £36,000 (Sotheby's, May 29, 2002, lot 975); the Longleat copy commanded $59,200 (Christie's, June 13, lot 110) that same year. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 1001. Blackmer 1357. Lipperheide Ma 30. Colas 2427. Hiler 772. Brunet IV, 885. Graesse V, 449. Cf. Heritage Library, Islamic Treasures, s. v. "Art" (illustration). Not in Cook (Egyptological Libr.), Fumagalli (Bibliogr. Etiopica), Gay, Abbey.
 

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257 Prisse d'Avennes, Achille Constant Théodore Émile. Oriental Album. Characters, Costumes, and Modes of Life, in the Valley of the Nile. London, James Madden, 1851. Folio. 31 tinted lithograph plates, all with partial hand-colouring. Contemporary red half morocco gilt.
  € 15,000
Second edition of one of the most sought-after and earliest publications by Prisse d'Avennes, who spent many years in Egypt after 1826, first as an engineer in the service of Mehmet Ali. After 1836 he explored Egypt disguised as an Arab, using the name Edris Effendi; during this period he carried out archaeological excavations in the valley of the Nile. In 1848 he first published his "Oriental Album". This unusual visual collection of "characters, costumes and modes of life in the valley of the Nile" is augmented by a commentary by the renowned orientalist and Egyptologist James Augustus St. John. - The frontispiece portrait depicts the artist's friend George Lloyd in the robes of a sheikh reclining with a hookah, and camels in the background. Lloyd, a botanist accompanying the expedition, accidentally shot himself whilst cleaning a rifle. - Light foxing, affecting some plates, with 2 plates trimmed at foot and laid down. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 1001. Blackmer 1357. Colas 2427. OCLC 4423031. Cf. Brunet IV, 885 (1st ed. only). Heritage Library, Islamic Treasures, s. v. "Art" (illustration). Not in Abbey. Lipperheide Ma 30 (1st ed.).
 

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First printed translation of the Quran
258 [Quran]. Machumetis Saracenorum principis, eiusque successorum vitae, ac doctrina, ipseque Alcoran. His adiunctae sunt confutationes multorum authorum una cum Martini Lutheri proemonitione. Adiunctae sunt etiam, Turcarum res gestae. Opera et studio Th. Bibliandri. [Basel, Johann Oporinus & Nikolaus Brylinger, 1543]. Folio (215 x 306 mm). 3 pts. in 1 volume. (28), 230, (10) pp. (8), 178 pp., 1 bl. f., 163 pp. (Bound with) II: John VI Kantakuzenos. Contra Mahometicam fidem christiana & orthodoxa assertio, Graece conscripta, nunc vero Latinitate donata, R. Gualthero interprete. Adiecta est eadem Graeca scripta. Basel, J. Oporinus, 1543. 2 pts. (12), 124, (4) pp. (8), 108, (2) pp. Contemporary half calf over wooden boards, signed and dated "PAZL 1659".
  € 45,000
First edition of the first-ever printed Quran translation. "The text of this Latin version is based upon an Arabic manuscript acquired by Pierre de Cluny and Bernard de Clairvaux in Toledo in the 12th century. Pierre de Cluny charged the Englishman Robert von Kent, also in Toledo, with translating the ms. into Latin. Four hundred years later, Martin Luther had a copy of this text, and he commissioned Theodor Bibliander to publish it. Apart from this version, Bibliander used three other mss. he had managed to discover. However, the finished print sheets as well as the set type were seized by the Basel authorities on 1 July 1542. Prolonged negotiations ensued, and Oporinus was arrested on 30 August and imprisoned briefly. It was only the emphatic intervention by Luther and Melanchthon that prevented the work from being destroyed. On 7 December, the Basel council permitted the book to be published under the condition that neither the name of the city nor that of the printer be stated. Luther was compelled to contribute a preface, and the book must be sold in Wittenberg only" (cf. Enay). The second part contains a compilation of earlier writings about Islam and the Quran, some printed in Greek and Latin parallel text, including writings by Savonarola and Nicolaus Cusanus. The third part contains writings about the Ottomans, Islam, and Tamerlane's Mongolian invasion. - II: First edition of this discussion of Islamic teachings and the life of Muhammad by Emperor John Kantakuzenos. Both works are rather clean; worming (especially near beginning and end of the volume) has been professionally repaired. Binding somewhat rubbed and bumped as well as wormed. A similar binding is described in the "Festschrift Otto Schäfer", p. 434: both bear the initials of Placidus Hieber, abbot (1640-78) of Lambach monastery and famous not only for the Baroque splendour of his rule, but also for his death (he was poisoned by his cook). Rare: the last copy in the trade was that in the Burrell collection (sold at Sotheby's, Oct 15, 1999). (more)
  ¶ I: VD 16, ZV 18456. Adams M 1889 (?). BM-STC German 479. Graesse IV, 43. Cf. Göllner 1792-93 and Benzing, Luther, 2766-68 (variants); Enay 102 (2nd ed: Basel 1550). - II: VD 16 J 376. Adams J 261. IA 131.339. Göllner 802.
 

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259 [Quran]. Ryer, André du. L'Alcoran de Mahomet. Translaté d'Arabe en François. Paris, Antoine de Sommaville, 1647. 4to. (10), 648 [but: 598], (4) pp. Contemp. full French speckled calf with gilt tooling and title label on spine, dentelles on inner covers.
  € 6,500
Rare first edition of "the oldest complete translation of the Qur'an into a European vernacular" (Encylopedia of the Qur'an), in a handsome copy. Du Ryer's work served as the basis for further translations of the Qur'an into English, German, Dutch, and Russian, and was instrumental in introducing Europeans to the tenets of the Muslim faith. Ryer was a celebrated linguist and had lived in Egypt and Turkey, where he studied classical Arabic. His introduction briefly summarizes the Muslim religion for Christian readers, noting customs such as Ramadan, circumcision, the practice of having up to four wives, the significance of Mecca and Medina, Sufi brotherhoods and wandering ascetics, and finally the Islamic recognition of Jesus as a prophet but not the son of God. A prayer printed in Arabic in included on the verso of leaf e2. - "Du Ryer's translation of the Qur'an [...] became an unparalleled literary success [...] The easy availability of the Qur'an accompanied a newfound interest in the Orient; additionally, du Ryer's translation lacked the polemical tone of previous editions, an orientation which arose mainly in ecclesiastical contexts. Du Ryer used Islamic commentaries such as al-Bayawi'sAnwar al-tanzil, the Tafsir al-Jalalayan by al-Mahalli (d. 864/1459) and al-Suyu i (d. 911/1505), or an excerpt from al-Razi's (d. 606/1210) great commentary made by l-Raghi l-Tunisi (d. 715/1315) entitled al-Tanwir fi l-tafsir, quite casually in his translation, merely noting them in the margins. The deprecatory tone present in the introductory chapter, 'Sommaire de la religion des Turcs,' can be understood as an attempt at camouflage (cf. Hamilton and Richard, André du Ryer, 94f)" (Encyclopedia of the Qur'an). - Extremities and joints professionally repaired. Internally fresh and clean, a very good copy with 19th-c. engr. bookplate of Sir Robert Sheffield, Bart., on front pastedown (one of the Sheffield baronets, likely the 4th, 1786-1862). (more)
  ¶ Chauvin X, p. 126. Schnurrer 427. Fück 74. Brunet III, 1309. Encyclopedia of the Qur'an V, 347.
 

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With the genealogy of the Prophet
260 Quran. The Koran, commonly called the Alcoran of Mohammed, translated into English [...] by George Sale. London, C. Ackers for J. Wilcox, 1734. Large 4to. (4), IX, (3), 187, (1), 508, (16) pp. With folding engr. map, folding engr. plate, and 3 (2 folding) engr. genealogical tables. Modern half calf with marbled covers, gilt.
  € 3,500
First printing of this important translation. "Showered with praise from the start" (cf. Enay). "The classic translation of the Quran [...] Sale worked from the original Arabic, but also used Marracci's Latin version, about which he said it was very precise, but too literal [...] Sale's translation is marked by a rather sober tidiness. Sale himself saw his work as a sort of defence of a much-maligned book [...] The translation's dispassionate, dry objectivity was an enormous step forward for western Quranic studies. Its deserved success was based to no little extent on the 'Preliminary Discourse', which provides a general introduction to the Quran as well as an overview of the most important Muslim denominations [...] For a century this account remained one of the principal sources from which the European educated elite drew its knowledge of all matters Quranic" (cf. Fück). - Title page slightly wrinkled and dusty. A good, very unobtrusively browned copy in an appealing modern binding. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin X, 146. Schnurrer 429. Fück 104f. Enay 169. Graesse IV, 44. Ebert 11524.
 

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261 [Quran]. Sale, George. The Koran: commonly called the Alcoran of Mohammed. Translated into English immediately from the original Arabic. with explanatory notes taken from the most approved commentators. [...] A new edition. London, William Tegg & Co., 1850. 8vo. XVI, 132, 516 pp. With 5 folding plates (map, plan, 3 genealogical tables). Publisher's brown cloth.
  € 800
Later edition of the famous English Qur'an translation by George Sale (1697-1736), which had first appeared in 1734. It remained one of the most prestigious translations into the 20th century: in January 2007, Keith Ellison, the first Muslim elected to the United States Congress, was sworn in on an old edition of Sale's Koran, donated to the Library of Congress in the early 19th century by Thomas Jefferson. - From the library of the British philosopher of religion, David Arthur Pailin (b. 1936), with his bookplate and notes laid in. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin X, 159. Graesse IV, 44. OCLC 12275628. Cf. Schnurrer 429. Fück 104 (1734).
 

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The finest German Qur'an produced in the 20th century
262 [Quran]. El Koran. Das heißt Die Lesung. Übertragen durch Lazarus Goldschmidt. Berlin, Brandus, 1916. Folio (285 x 392 mm). 214, (2) pp. With illustrated double title page and decorations after old manuscripts by Lazarus Goldschmidt. Original giltstamped morocco with two clasps. All edges gilt.
  € 12,500
No. 7 of 29 de luxe copies on Japanese vellum (total issue: 240 copies). "The finest German Qur'an produced in the 20th century" (Enay). Lavishly designed in the style of the old oriental manuscripts and printed in Delitsch's Roman type, specially cut for this work. Goldschmidt’s literal transcription follows the text of the Flügel edition. The magnificent binding is well preserved with only occasional minor rubbing. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Rodenberg 445. Enay 121.
 

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First exploration of the flora of the Middle East
263 Rauwolf, Leonhard. Aigentliche beschreibung der Raiß, so er vor diser Zeit gegen Auffgang inn die Morgenländer, fürnemlich Syriam, Iudaeam, Arabiam, Mesopotamiam, Babyloniam, Assyriam, Armeniam &c. nicht ohne geringe Mühe unnd grosse Gefahr selbs volbracht [...]. Lauingen, Leonhard Reinmichel f. Georg Willer in Augsburg, 1583. 4to. 4 parts in one volume. (16), 487, (57) pp. With a woodcut on title pages of parts 2 and 3 and 42 page-size woodcuts of plants in part 4. Contemp. vellum with blindstamped initials "IKD", dated 1586 (repaired; spine rebacked).
  € 24,000
First complete edition, including the fourth part which contains 42 woodcuts of oriental plants unknown till then, among them the Rauwolfia (important to pharmaceutics). Rauwolf, an Augsburg physician, travelled to the Near East to collect and describe the flora of the region. His account of the three-year journey provides details not only of the plants he encountered but also of the people and their customs as well as of the difficulties of travel, containing many authentic and reliable observations. His reports also include the first printed account of coffee as a social drink (cf. Hünersdorff/H. II, 1221). "He was the first modern botanist to collect and describe the flora of the regions east of the Levantine coast" (Norman). "Rauwolf is the 16th century's German Belon. No Holy Land pilgrim surpasses these physicians and botanists in their scientific aims and achievements" (cf. Tobler). The plant woodcuts, all captioned with their Arabic as well as Turkish names, were reprinted on a reduced scale in Dalechamps' "Historia Generalis Plantarum". Apart from the local flora, in which he shows particular interest, he also discusses all things medical, illnesses, cures, baths, food, and drink. His descriptions of the remains of the ancient cities on the Euphrates are among the earliest in the west. While these accounts are rather cursory, he provides a vivid and detailed presentation of modern life in the cities where he stayed, including Aleppo, Baghdad, Jerusalem, describing their political, geographical, and economic relevance. - Some browning and brownstaining; old ownerships to title page and occasional marginalia by a contemporary hand. The Burrell copy of the 1582 edition - which did not yet include the illustrated fourth part - commanded £16,200 at Sotheby's in 1999. (more)
  ¶ VD 16, R 431. Norman 1782. Gay 3592. Nissen, BBI 1587. Bucher 129 & 130. Bucher, Lauingen, 122. Mueller 173. Hünersdorff/H. 1221. Röhricht 758. Wellcome I, 5347. Tobler 79-81.
 

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264 Reeve, A. The Commission of H.M.S. Perseus. East Indies. Including Persian Gulf and Somaliland. 1901-1904. (The log series, no. 12). London, Westminster Press (Gerrards Ltd.), 1904. 8vo. (8), 135, (1), 6, (10) pp. With 16 photo plates. Publisher's original half cloth with illustrated boards.
  € 1,250
Only edition of this rare and detailed account of the operations performed by the H.M.S. Perseus during her three-year commission in the Middle East, including visits to the Sheikhs of Sharjah and Dubai. - The 300-foot cruiser Perseus was launched in 1897 and completed in 1901. Under the command of Commander Edmund R. Pears, she was in March 1901 commissioned to form part of the East Indies fleet, and in September 1901 prevented the landing of Turkish troops at Kuwait. During her journeys between India, Africa, and Arabia, the Perseus also called at the Trucial Coast settlements: on April 17th, 1903, the ship anchored at Sharjah ("a large town extending five or six miles; extensive buildings and forest of palm trees; many dhows in course of construction on the beach"). H.R.H. Sheikh Saqr II bin Khalid Al Qasimi boarded the Perseus with a large entourage. He was shown around, observed shell practise from the three-pounder cannon and personally fired several rounds from the deck Maxim, an early fully automatic machine gun. Seizing upon the availability of such impressive backup, the Sheikh "was anxious for us to convey some of his troops up the coast to one of his villages, where taxes have been owed him for a considerable while." After taking aboard the Sultan of Oman the following morning, the ship continued to Dubai, where H.R.H. Sheikh Maktoum II bin Hushur visited the vessel and was shown the ordnance, "the Sheik again firing a few rounds" from the Maxim gun. Indeed, the local rulers were "very interested in maxims and the number of rounds that can be fired a minute from them. This Sheik asked for one, which, of course, was impossible." The following morning saw the Perseus in Abu Dhabi, "a large town with numerous palm groves", where the Sultan was fetched off the ship by a steam cutter after more target practise ("also exploded a mine [...] The Sultan wanted to see another, but we had no time for that"). Two days later, the ship anchored at Bahrein before proceeding to Bushire and then back to Muscat. - Spine-ends very slightly chipped; Larchmont Yacht Club bookplate on pastedown. A clean and sound copy. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 38470445.
 

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265 Reland, Adrian. De religione Mohammedia libri duo. Quorum prior exhibet compendium theologiae Mohammedicae, ex codice manuscripto Arabice editum, Latine versum, & notis illustratum. Posterior examinat nonnulla, quae falso Mohammedanis tribuuntur. Utrecht, Willem Broedelet, 1705. 8vo. (32), 188, (28) pp. Title printed in red and black; engr. title vignette. Contemp. marbled boards with giltstamped red spine label. Edges sprinkled in red.
  € 950
First edition. "A groundbreaking work [...] Part 1 contains a brief dogmatic treatise in Arabic and Latin, providing an Islamic self-portrait, while part 2 corrects some prevalent misconceptions about Islam" (cf. Fück). Reland (d. 1718) held the chair of oriental languages at the University of Utrecht. - Some browning and occasional brownstaining; extremeties rubbed and bumped. Old ownerships to front pastedown: "Sm. Hjelmér, Stockholm 1797"; "Otto Fr. Sullberg 1822"; "C. A. Womquist 1854". Very rare, in contrast to the second edition published in 1717. No copy in auction records of the past decades. (more)
  ¶ Fürst III, 150. Fück 102. pkpk
 

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266 Reland, Adrian, et al. Four Treatises Concerning the Doctrine, Discipline, and Worship of the Mahometans [...]. London, J. Darby for B. Lintott, 1712. 8vo. 85, (11), 254 pp. Contemp. boards; spine rebacked with calf; giltstamped spine label. All edges red.
  € 2,500
Four important 17th and 18th century Western treatises on Islam, uniting works by Adrian Reland, Albert Bobovius, and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz. Reland's two works in especial, first published in 1705, were considered a groundbreaking achievement: the first contains a brief dogmatic treatise (translated from an Arabic ms.), providing a Muslim self-portrait, while the second rectifies prevalent misconceptions about Islam (cf. Fück). The material, including translations of many passages, was drawn from original sources, chiefly from the 11th-century philosopher Ahmad ibn al-Husayn Abu Shuja` al-Isfahani (cf. Quérard, La France litt. VII, 512). Adriaan Reelant (1676-1718) held the chair of oriental languages at the University of Utrecht. The third part, originally published in Latin (Oxford 1690) as "Tractus de Turcorum liturgia", also discusses the pilgrimage to Mecca and includes notes by Thomas Hyde. The fourth part, by Mathurin Veyssière de Lacroze, was first published in his "Dissertations historiques sur divers sujets" (Rotterdam, 1707; cf. Quérard IV, 381). The present translation includes "a letter from Mr. Leibnitz to the author" (pp. 245-254). - From the library of the British philosopher of religion, David Arthur Pailin (b. 1936), with his bookplate and notes laid in. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin XII, 1384. OCLC 15270828. Cf. Fück 102 (Reland). Not in Brunet.
 

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267 Rif'at Basa, Ibrahim. Mir'at al-haramain: ar-Rihlat al-higaziya wal-hagg wa-masairuhu d-diniya. Cairo, Dar al-Kutub al-Misriya, 1925. 8vo. 2 vols. (16), 514, (2) pp. (12), 395, (3) pp. With 364 numbered illustrations (some in colour). Original red half calf with giltstamped title to spine and red cloth cover.
  € 3,000
Original edition of the groundbreaking topographical work on Hejaz and the Hajj, "View of the Two Holy Sanctuaries, or Travels in Hejaz and the Hajj and its Religious Ceremonies". Profusely illustrated with photographs taken by the author, Major-General Ibrahim Rif'at Pasha (1857-1935), whom this work earned a reputation as perhaps the best-known photographer of the Holy Cities and sites of his age. "In 1925 Liwa Ibrahim Rif'at Pasha published his two-volume work 'Mirat al-Haramayn' (Mirror of the Two Sanctuaries) at Cairo's National Library Press. Frustrated at his inability to describe adequately the inspiring sites he saw on his 1901 Hajj, the general decided to learn to take photographs himself. He could then make a pictorial record of his subsequent pilgrimages, because 'however precise my verbal descriptions I could never have been able to depict the whole truth nor fascinate you in any way [as effectively] as looking and beholding can'" (Peters, The Hajj, p. xv). - Obliterated library stamps on title pages (some damage to paper). Very appealingly bound set. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1900. OCLC 162922071, 162922085.
 

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268 [Rivara, Joaquim Heliodoro da Cunha (ed.)]. Archivo Portuguez-Oriental. Nova-Goa (Panaji), na Imprensa Nacional, 1857-1867. 8vo. 6 parts in 10 vols. (including supplements). Modern half calf with faux marbled covers, double giltstamped red spine labels and gilt armorial spines auf 4 raised bands.
  € 9,500
Important collection of early historical sources from the Archives of the Portuguese Government of India in Goa, edited at the behest of the Conselho ultramarina of Portugal. Portuguese expansion into the Indian Ocean had begun in the early 16th century following Vasco da Gama's explorations and led to numerous armed conflicts with the Ottoman Empire along the coast of the Arabian Gulf. Here, the Portuguese asserted their suzerainity for more than two centuries: in 1750, Nasir bin Murshid al-Yaribi, Imam of Oman, ousted the Portuguese from Muscat, which Afonso de Albuquerque had conquered in 1507. Until the 18th century, the Portuguese governor in Goa had authority over all Portuguese possessions in the Indian Ocean, from southern Africa to southeast Asia. In 1844 the Portuguese Government of India stopped administering the territory of Macau, Solor and Timor, but only in 1975 did Portugal recognize Indian control over what was formerly Portuguese India. - Joaquim da Cunha Rivara (1809-79), of Arrayolos, came to Goa in 1855 as Secretary General of Portuguese India. "Cunha Rivara lived in Goa twenty-two years, and studied not only the Archives in his charge, but also those of the 'Relacâo' of the old Senate of Goa, of the Revenue Department and others. In 1857, he began the publication [...] of the documents he found, printing them [...] under the title of 'Archivo Portuguez Oriental'. Up till 1877 he succeeded in publishing six small collections and supplements, forming in all ten volumes in octavo containing royal letters to the City of Goa, to the Viceroys and Governors, and many other documents from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century" (Pope, India in Portuguese Literature [1937], p. 205). - Some browning as usual; some slight worming and repairs, but altogether a fine, complete example of the original set, appealingly bound. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 34992641.
 

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269 Rivoyre, Denis de. Obock, Mascate, Bouchire, Bassorah. Ouvrage illustré par Saint-Elme Gauthier et orné d'une Carte. Paris, E. Plon et Cie., 1883. 12mo. (4), 292 pp. With woodcut vignette on title page, 13 plates and a folding map. Original printed wrappers.
  € 850
First edition of this account of a journey made from Port Said, down the Red Sea to Mascate, and then along the Arabian Gulf ending in Baghdad. - Some foxing. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 254176761.
 

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270 Roberts, A. The adventures of (Mr T. S.) an English merchant, taken prisoner by the Turks of Algiers, and carried into the inland countries of Africa: with a description of the kingdom of Algiers, of all the towns and places of note thereabouts. Whereunto is added a relation of the chief commodities of the countrey, and of the actions and manners of the people. Written first by the author, and fitted for the publick view by A. Roberts. London, (William Wilson and) Moses Pitt, 1670. Small 8vo. (8), 252 [but 254], (2) pp. (includes final leaf of ads). Contemporary calf, rebacked.
  € 9,500
First edition of this extraordinary account of an Englishman’s capture by Barbary pirates and subsequent adventures as a slave in Algeria. The narrative is framed as an authentic journal of a deceased traveller, prepared for the press by a friend of the departed. Through this mechanism the reader is taken into a proto-novelistic fantasy, albeit one that must have been informed by genuine experience of Eastern travel. As a slave under numerous masters the author tricks his way variously into employment as the cook to the King of Algiers, is then demoted to Keeper of the King’s Bath and secretly fathers a daughter with one of the King’s wives. After an unsuccessful stint as a gardener’s assistant he journeys in the service of an officer, collecting tribute money with the Algerian army and offers his services as an advisor to the Ottoman governor of Tlemcen. He recounts observations on the various peoples encountered and their customs and peculiarities, marvelling at flying serpents, lions and ostriches and skirmishing with an army of Arabs. Against a backdrop of mosques, minarets and palaces, the narrative is peppered with anecdotes of meetings with Barbary pirates, European renegados, and dalliances with alluring women of the Maghreb. - The author takes particular relish in recounting the details of his sexual adventures: "the women in this country keep much at home, but their minds and affections are more wandering abroad, because they are so recluse; whereas if they had as much liberty as in other countries they would not be so furiously debauch’d: their husbands keep strict guard over them, that when they can escape their eyes, they give the reins to their passion, and labour to satisfy themselves more abundantly; stolen waters are sweet: the more they are forbidden and hindered from variety, the more pleasure and satisfaction they fancy in it [...] had my design been to make conquests in the Empire of Love, I think none could have been more happy [...] this good opinion of my ability spread & increased wonderfully in the town [...]". A separate appended section offers directions for navigating the Barbary coast. The work is of value both as a travel narrative and as a proto-novel reflecting the European fascination with the Orient. This is one of four journeys undertaken by Englishmen in the Ottoman Mediterranean analysed recently by Gerald Maclean in his 2004 study "The rise of Oriental travel: English visitors to the Ottoman Empire, 1580-1720". - Provenance: small stamp of Bibliothèque Generale, Rabat, to title, first leaf of dedication, and first leaf of text. Small ownership stamp of Alexander Gardyne, 1883, to verso of title. Manuscript bookplate of Henry White, Lichfield, 1820, to pastedown. A very good copy. (more)
  ¶ Playfair, Morocco, 244. Playfair, Algeria, 155. Pforzheimer, 846. Wing S152. Not in Blackmer or Atabey.
 

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Coloured de luxe issue: the Duke of Northumberland's copy
271 Roberts, David. The Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia [...]. (And:) Egypt & Nubia, from drawings made on the spot [...]. With historical descriptions by William Brockedon. London, F. G. Moon, 1842-1849. Large folio (610 x 456 mm). 6 vols. [Holy Land:] Lithogr. portrait of Roberts by C. Baugniet, 3 hand-coloured lithogr. titles, 120 hand-coloured lithogr. plates, all drawn on stone by Louis Haghe after David Roberts. [Egypt:] 3 hand-coloured lithogr. titles, 121 hand-coloured lithogr. plates, all drawn on stone by Louis Haghe after David Roberts, 1 engr. map. Contemp. citron morocco, bound by J. Wright, covers panelled in gilt, spines with raised bands in seven compartments, morocco lettering pieces in the 2nd and 3rd, the others with an overall repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges.
  € 450,000
An extraordinary set, comprising both of Roberts' monumental works on the Middle East, both in their first and most desirable hand-coloured deluxe issues. Bound in magnificent uniform citron morocco by John Wright of London. "One of the most important and elaborate ventures of nineteenth-century publishing and [...] the apotheosis of the tinted lithograph" (Abbey, p. 341), these works were originally published in three states: as an ordinary tinted edition, a hand-coloured de luxe issue in loose proofs, and - combining the virtues of both - the almost unobtainable hand-coloured and bound de luxe issue (as here), which the publisher Moon offered at the tenfold price of the regular one. Roberts’ masterpiece was issued in 41 parts over seven years, beautifully lithographed by Louis Haghe, to whom Roberts paid tribute in glowing terms: “Haghe has not only surpassed himself, but all that has hitherto been done of a similar nature. He has rendered the views in a style clear, simple and unlaboured, with a masterly vigour and boldness which none but a painter like him could have transferred to stone.” - After an apprenticeship to the Scottish house-painter, Gavin Buego, David Roberts (1796-1864) became assistant scene painter at the Pantheon theatre in Edinburgh. He continued scene painting in Glasgow and finally, in 1821, was hired to work with Clarkson Stanfield at the Drury Lane theatre in London. Both artists exhibited at the Society of British Artists, Royal Academy and British Institution, and by 1830 Roberts was firmly established as a topographical artist and was able to give up his work in the theatre. In 1838 he made plans for a journey to the Near East, inspired by his passion for artistic adventure. He departed in August 1839 for Alexandria and spent the remainder of the year in Cairo and visiting the major tombs and sites of Egypt. The following February he journeyed to the Holy Land, making stops in Suez, Mount Sinai and Petra. He spent time in Gaza before entering Jerusalem and concluded his tour by spending several months visiting the biblical sites of the Holy Land. Roberts returned to England at the end of 1839 and submitted his drawings to F. G. Moon in 1840. Moon arranged to bring out a volume of Scripture history, paying Roberts 3,000 pounds for the copyright of the sketches and for overseeing Haghe's efforts. Both the exhibition of his original watercolours and the subsequent published work were an immediate success and confirmed his reputation as an architectural and landscape artist of the highest order. - Coloured sets of Roberts are generally encountered with the lithographs trimmed, coloured and mounted on card, in imitation of the original watercolours. The present set, by contrast, is comprised of the regular tinted lithographed issue but with very fine contemporary hand colouring. The palette of colouring is consistent with the colouring of the “on card” issue, and the strictly contemporary binding confirms the age of the hand colouring. This set is beautifully bound by John Wright of London in a rather unusual and striking full citron morocco. Flourishing between 1830 and 1860, Wright was among the most fashionable of London binders in this important period. Ramsden refers to Wright as “a binder of the highest order” (Ramsden, London Book Binders, p. 154). Exceedingly rare thus; a copy in the second state as described above (hand-coloured but unbound in loose sheets) commanded $242,500 at Christie's in 2012. - Provenance: the Duke of Northumberland (Property of His Grace, The Duke of Northumberland, Books from Berkeley Castle sold by order of the Trustee of the Earl of Berkeley Will Trust, Sotheby’s London, 8-9 May 1986, lot 335). (more)
  ¶ Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 176. Abbey Travel II, 272 & 385. Tooley 401. Lipperheide Ma 27. Cf. Hiler 753. The Heritage Library, Islamic Treasures, s. v. "Art" (illustration).
 

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272 Roberts, David. The Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia, Egypt and Nubia. London, Day & Son, 1855-1856. Large 4to (29 x 20 cm). 6 vols. bound as 3. With tinted lithogr. portrait, 6 titles, 2 maps & 241 plates, totalling 250 tissue-guarded plates of the Holy Land and the Middle East, with accompanying text. Three-quarters morocco with pebbled cloth sides, marbled endpapers. All edges gilt.
  € 18,000
First quarto edition. The series of views of ancient sites in the Near and Middle East created by British artist David Roberts is today regarded as one of the most important and elaborate ventures of nineteenth-century publishing, and the apotheosis of the tinted lithograph. - With a small David Roberts autograph note laid in: "My dear Sir James, your note came all right, and which I answered this morning in the affirmative - the delay arose from the precarious state of my [...] health. Yours always [...]". - Light wear, remains of bookplates on front pastedown, but a clean, sound set. (more)
  ¶ Abbey Travel 272 & 385 & 388; 341. Aboussouan 790. Röhricht 405. pkpk
 

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273 Robinson, Arthur E. The Mahmal of the Moslem Pilgrimage. [London], Royal Asiatic Society, 1931. 8vo. (117)-127, (1) pp. Original printed wrappers.
  € 250
Offprint from the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society. About the Mahmal, the closed rectangular pyramidal canopy taken along on camelback on Egyptian and Syrian pilgrimages to Mecca before Ibn Saud's conquest of the Hejaz in 1925 - a "very curious custom in Islam", the origin and purport of which the present essay undertakes to investigate. "It is very improbable that the Mahmal [...] will be seen in the Hejaz again [...] The Mahmal is heretical to Islam, and the Wahhabis [...] have declined to admit the Mahmal into the Hejaz" (p. 117). - Wrapper shows insignificant ruststains from staples, otherwise in perfect condition. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 47931240. Not in Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula.
 

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274 Roches, Léon. Trente-deux ans a travers l'Islam. (1832-1864). Paris, Firmin-Didot, 1884-1885. 8vo. 2 vols. 508 pp. 503 pp. With portrait frontispiece. Contemp. green marbled half cloth with giltstamped labels to spine.
  € 800
First edition. - Born in Grenoble to a Franco-Algerian emigrant, Roches (1809-1901) became an officer in the National Guard created by the Duc de Rovigo, Governor General of Algeria. He learned Arabic and joined the camp of Abdul Kader, leader of Algerian resistance to France. Roches converted to Islam and travelled to Tunisia and Cairo, where he met Mohammed Ali. He also visited Hijaz, Medina and Mecca. He describes the pilgrimage, the two cities and the arrival of the Syrian and Egyptian Mahmal. Roches returned to Algeria via Cairo and Rome, but was later driven out of the country and took refuge in Morocco. After the defeat of Prince Abdul Kader in 1848, Roches held official positions in Tripoli and Tunis. The first volume of his memoir deals with his travels in Algeria and his relations with Prince Abdul Kader; the second deals with his mission to Mecca. - Fine copy from the library of Baron J. de Jessé-Levas with his bookplate to pastedowns and his autograph signature and note "Rare" to flyleaves. (more)
  ¶ Playfair, Bibliography of Algeria, 1575. OCLC 10589735. Not in Macro. pkpk
 

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From the library of a travelling Turkish scholar
275 Romanus (Roomen), Adrianus (van). Parvum theatrum urbium sive urbium praecipuarum totius orbis brevis et methodica descriptio. Urbium praecipuarum totius orbis brevis et methodica descriptio [...]. Frankfurt, Nicolaus Basse, 1595. 4to. (8), 365 [but: 371], (25) pp. Title page printed in red and black. With 67 half-page woodcuts in the text (mostly views of cities) and woodcut printer's device. Contemp. vellum with multiple gilt and blindstamped cover fillets, large gilt lozenge-shaped central compartment with heraldic supralibros bearing the legend "Nicolaus Haunolt Sac[rae] Caes[aris] M[ajesta]tis [...] Secretarius". Corner fleurons; spine sparsely gilt.
  € 5,800
First edition; reprinted without changes in 1608. "Contains descriptions of Florida, New-France, New-Spain, Nova Galicia, Yucatan, Cuba, Brazil, Peru, etc." (Sabin). Also with views of Constantinople, Jerusalem, Genoa, London, Rostock, Rome, Vienna, Prague, Riga, Zurich, Genf, Bremen, Dresden, Geneva, Lubeck, Cologne, Leipzig, Mainz, Marburg, Munich, Nuremberg, Strasbourg, Trier, Ulm, Venice, Wittenberg and many others. - From the library and with the bookplate of Nicolaus Haunolt, whose biography can be traced up to the year 1586 (cf. Yerasimos, Stephane. Les voyageurs dans l'Empire Ottoman (XIVe-XVIe siécles). Ankara 1991. In: Turkish Biographical Archive G 18, 68). However, other books from the Imperial secretary's library printed as late as 1597 could be established in public and private collections. - Slightly browned throughout; last f. has small section cut out (no loss to text). Title page with ms. ownership of the Piarists' school in Tata near Györ (dated 1767). Very pretty and well-preserved copy in a decorative contemporary binding with interesting provenance. (more)
  ¶ VD 16, R 3024. Adams R 694. Bachmann 14. Muller 1376. Sabin 73000. Alden 595.
 

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276 Roobacker, Cornelis Cornelisz / Hotz, A. (ed.). Cornelis Cornelisz Roobacker's scheepsjournaal Gamron-Basra (1645); de eerste reis der nederlanders door de perzische golf. In: Tijdschrift van het Koninklijk Nederlandsch Aardrijkskundig Genootschap. Leiden, E. J. Brill, 1907. 8vo. (289)-405, 406-545 pp. With 3 folding maps and a folding table. Original printed wrappers.
  € 850
First edition. - In 1645, Captain Cornelis Roobacker set out from Bandar Abbas with two small Dutch ships for the first trading mission to Basra, which could only be reached with small vessels in the shallow waters of the upper end of the Gulf. Three logbooks of this expedition have survived in the Dutch General State Archives; the only one of these to be published is the logbook no. 280a, here edited for the first and only time by A. Hotz. Among the plates are a modern map of the Gulf region as well as a 17th century Dutch nautical chart which the editor errouneously attributed to Roobacker. "Roobacker's ships had English charts on board, but Roobacker complained that they were very inaccurate [... He] made a chart of his travels between Laraq and Basra, with marks of depths and accurate notes on geographic latitude. This chart shows his progress up to Bubiyan" (Slot, The Origins of Kuwait [1991], p. 18). - Occasional slight foxing and insignificant edge damage, still, a good copy of an important and much-quoted source. (more)
  ¶ B. J. Slot, The Arabs of the Gulf 1602-1784, p. 11. OCLC 71448278.
 

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277 Rooke, Henri. Voyage sur les côtes de l'Arabie heureuse, sur la Mer Rouge et en Egypte. Contenant le récit d'un combat des Anglois avec M. de Suffrein, et leur expédition contre le Cap de Bonne-Espérance en 1781 [...] Traduit de l'Anglois, d'après la seconde édition. London, Royez, 1788. 8vo. (2), VI, 154 pp. (error in paging: pp. 153-154 misnumbered 152-153). Contemp. boards.
  € 3,500
First French translation, from the second English edition (first published in English in 1784): an account of a journey made from Yemen to the Red Sea and Egypt and on to Europe. Rooke's narrative commentary on the expedition despatched in 1781 with the object of capturing the Cape provides descriptions of Mecca, Jeddah, and Cairo. Includes extensive notes by the translator. - Slight brownstaining; slight flaw to spine, otherwise in good condition. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1936. Aboussouan 797. Gay 116. Mendelssohn IV, 78. OCLC 4669621. Cf. Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 181 (Paris, Agasse, 1788). Not in Atabey or Blackmer.
 

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Notice sur les Wahabis
278 [Rousseau, Jean Baptiste Louis Jacques]. Description du Pachalik de Bagdad. Suivie d'une notice historique sur les Wahabis, et de quelques autres pièces relatives à l'Histoire et à la Littérature de l'Orient. Paris, Treuttel & Würtz, 1809. 8vo. VII, (1), 261 pp. Original boards with giltstamped spine fillets and traces of a stamped spine label. All edges sprinkled in red.
  € 2,500
Extremely rare description of the province of Baghdad (treating geography, economy, politics), anonymously edited and annotated by the great orientalist Sylvestre de Sacy. The appendix contains Rousseau's groundbreaking "Notice sur les Wahabis", as well as a "Notice sur les Yézidis" by Maurizio Garzoni, who had spent 18 years in Kurdistan, translated into French by de Sacy. The volume is concluded by a series of "Poésies Persanes", translated by Rousseau (1780-1831). The French orientalist knew the region intimately due to having served there as French consul. - Binding somewhat rubbed. Front flyleaf trimmed closely; occasional brownstaining but altogether a good, clean copy. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1962. Wilson 194. Quérard VIII, 233. OCLC 7034932. Cf. Henze IV, 685.
 

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279 Rudolf II, Emperor. Printed mandate: appeal for prayer against Turkish army. Vienna, 14. VIII. 1592. Oblong folio (499 x 354 mm). Broadsheet. 1 p. With papered seal. Folded.
  € 1,500
The Lower Austrian government renews its 1566 mandate for general prayer against the Turkish threat. - After the running battles at the Habsburg-Turkish border steadily grew into open war, Rudolf II formally renounced the peace treaty with the Ottoman Empire in October 1592. The Battle of Sissek in June 1593 marked the beginning of the so-called Long Turkish War. - 17th-century notes on reverse. Some wrinkling; tiny paper defect and browning to folds. Signed by the Lower Austrian governor Ruprecht von Stotzingen, Dr. Elias Corning, Dr. V. Spindler, and another government official. (more)
  ¶ Starzer, Regesten aus dem k. k. Archiv für Niederösterreich (1906), no. 5601.
 

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280 Rudolf II, Emperor. Printed mandate: reminding the population to persist in their constant prayer against the Turks. Vienna, 1. VII. 1594. Oblong folio (428 x 302 mm). Broadsheet. 1 p. With papered seal. Folded..
  € 1,500
Renewal of the mandate issued 22 September 1593, ordering general prayer against the Turkish troops, as the Emperor has learned that his order is not obeyed as thoroughly as might be desired: "So gelangt Uns doch mit hocher befrembdung glaubwirdig an, das fast aller ortten bey Euch denen Stätten, unnd sonst in gemain, das FrüGebett undter leyttung der Türckhen Glocken schlechtlich gehalten, die Letaney wenig besuecht, unnd schier niemandts zu Straß noch Hauß gesehen wirdt, der undter der GebettGlocken nider kniet, das Haubt entblesset, oder einer dem andern ein guet Exempel gebe, Sonder ohne schew, unnd hindann gesetzt der obligenden Christlichen gebier seinen weeg fort wandlet, und sich also aller dingsdd erzeigen, alß wann sie das Geleyt oder Gebett nicht angieng, Ja (daß gar abscheuchlich) wann sie gleich andere dißfalß gehorsambe unnd eyfferige Christen vor ihnen sehen, dises hoch nottwendig werkh an ihnen gleichsamb für spöttlich halten, unnd wol darüber schimpfliche reden unnd geberdt treiben [...]". The Battle of Sissek on 22 June 1593 had sparked a Turkish war that was to last until 1606. - Some 17th-c. ms. notes on reverse; slightly wrinkled and browned, with tears to folds. With autogr. signatures of the Lower Austrian governor Ruprecht von Stotzingen and the chancellor Christoph Pirckheimer as well as two additional signatures by government agents. (more)
  ¶ Not in Starzer.
 

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281 Ruete, Emily, Princess of Oman and Zanzibar. Mémoires d'une Princesse Arabe. Traduit de l'allemand par L. Lindsay. Paris, Dujarric & Cie., 1905. Small 8vo. (6), 330 pp. Contemp. half calf with marbled boards and giltstamped spine. Marbled endpapers.
  € 850
First French edition of this fascinating biography of the Princess of Oman and Zanzibar, who married a German and later fled to Aden and Hamburg after becoming pregnant by him. The work is considered the first known autobiography of an Arab woman. It presents a remarkable perspective on the daily life of the Sultan in the mid and late 19th century, viewed from the eyes of an well-educated woman - subjects such as "La situation de la femme en Orient" ("A Woman's Position in the East", ch. XVI), courtship ("La mariage arabe", "Arab Matchmaking", ch. XVII), harems and polygamy, and even slavery are discussed at length (the Princess appearing rather favourably disposed to the latter!). As a later Christian convert, she remains fiercely proud of her homeland: "But it is just in Arabia, and with the Arab people, that the true Mahometan spirit, upon which the views of other Eastern nations are founded, has maintained itself most pure" (transl.). Her view of Muslim life represents the level-headed appreciation of a native of both East and West: "I have seen too many of such unhappy cases [of Christian marriage] to make me believe that Christian wedlock stands on a higher level or renders people much happier than the Mahometan [...] it is quite a fallacy to think that woman in the East is placed socially on a lower level than man. The legitimate wife - the purchased Sarari are of course to be excepted - stands in all respects on a par with her husband, and she always retains her rank, and all rights and titles emanating from it". Emily (Sayyida Salme) and her husband lived comfortably in Germany until the latter's death in 1870, upon which Emily was prompted to write the present work partly to alleviate her financial concerns. - Evenly browned throughout. Rare. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 38270253. Cf. Hiler 763 (english ed. New York, 1907).
 

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282 [Russio-Persian War 1722-1723]. Der Allerneueste Staat von Casan, Astracan, Georgien und Vieler Andern dem Czaren, Sultan und Schach, Zinsbaren und Unterthanen Tartarn, Landschaften und Provinzien: samt Einer Kurzen Nachricht von der Caspischen See, dem Daria-Strom, ingleichen von dem Persischen Hof, und Dessen Allerneuesten Staats- und Kriegs- Verfassung; zur Erläuterung der Russisch- und Persischen Kriegs-Operationen Entworfen, und mit Dienlichen Kupfern Ausgezieret [The very Latest Account of Kazan, Astrakhan, Georgia and many Other Possessions of the Czar, Sultan and Chakh, Tributary and Subjects Tartars, Landscapes and Provinces: with a Brief Account on the Caspian Sea]. Nuremberg, Wolfgang Moritz Endters sel. Erben, 1724. 12mo. (24), 398 pp. With an engr. frontispiece and 4 folding engr. plates. Period quarter vellum with decorative papered boards. Rebacked with 17th century vellum with decorative manuscript initials.
  € 4,500
First edition, second issue. - Rare work and one of the first books on Russio-Persian War of 1722-1723, published anonymously just a year after the end of the war and thoroughly describing the regions of the Southern Russia, the Caucasus and the Caspian Sea. The author describes the events of the war which ended with a Russian victory and the subsequent Russian annexation of the Persian cities Derbent, Baku, Rasht, and the northern Persian provinces of Shirvan, Gilyan and others. The author also describes all regions influenced by the war: the Volga River and all its major cities, including Kazan and Astrakhan (as the two main centers of the organization of the Persian campaign); the Caucasus: Georgia, Mingrelia, Dagestan and others; the Western Caspian Sea region and its largest cities Baku, Derbent and Shemakha. Remarkably, Baku inhabitants are described as sick and lethargic, due to contamination of the water by Naphta (oil). The text describes the geography of the Caucasus Mountains, including Mount Elbrus, the manners and customs of the people, genealogy of local Georgian and Mingrelian princes and others. Includes an engraved portrait of Sultan Hossein who ruled Persia at the time, three engraved views of Derbent, Baku and Shemakha (the Baku view showing various images of burning oil wells), and an engraved plate of local costumes. A few library stamps on half-title and title, otherwise a very good copy from the library of the theologian Isidor Keppler (1715-92) with his ms. ownership (dated 1751) to the beginning of the text. (more)
  ¶ Nitsche-Stender 189.
 

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283 Rutter, Eldon. The Holy Cities of Arabia. London & New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, Ltd., (1928). 8vo. 2 vols. XV, (1), 302, (2) pp. VII, (1), 287, (1) pp. With 2 photogr. frontispieces and 8 maps and plans. Original green giltstamped cloth. Top edge gilt.
  € 850
First edition. Rutter describes his pilgrimage from Suez by sea to Massowa and El Gahm, and thence by land through Birk, Halli, El Gunfida, El Lith, and Wadi Yelamlam to the Holy City of Mecca where he stayed for nine months. Volume II describes an excursion from Mecca to Es-Sayl and to Et-Taif, his final departure from Mecca and his journey through Rabigh to Medina, and concludes with his passage from Medina to El Yanbua. - A good, clean und unbrowned copy with insignificant wear to spine-ends. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1971. Howgego III, R43. Ghani 586. pkpk
 

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284 Rycaut, Paul. Istoria dello stato presente dell'Imperio Ottomano. Venice, Combi & La Noù, 1672. 4to. (14), 296 pp. With engr., illustrated title, woodcut printer's device to printed title page, and 21 engravings in the text, mostly half-page. Contemp. vellum.
  € 2,800
First Italian edition of Sir Paul Rycaut‘s famous Turkish chronicle, "The Present State of the Ottoman Empire", first published in 1668 and drawn from various authentic sources and from the author‘s own observations. "His most important work [...] presents an animated and, on the whole, faithful picture of Turkish manners" (DNB). "Provides an account of the society and political system of the Ottoman Empire with unprecedented thoroughness" (cf. Osterhammel, Die Entzauberung Asiens, 32). "An extremely important and influential work, which provides the fullest account of Ottoman affairs during the 17th century“ (Blackmer, 2nd ed. only). Constantino Belli's version is probably based on the 1670 French translation by Pierre Briot. The attractive engravings by Suor Isabella Piccini depict dignitaries and persons of various ranks in their costumes, as well as the illustration of a turban, specially mentioned by Atabey. - Covers slightly warped. Library label to pastedown; half-title stamped "Graf Segur". A good, very clean copy from the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ BL-STC (17th-century Italian) 806. Atabey 1070. Graesse VI/1, 108. Cf. Blackmer 1464 (2nd ed). Weber II, 333f. Hiler 770 (1686 English ed.).
 

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285 Saadi. [Gulistan, germanice.] Persianischer Rosenthal. In welchem viel lustige Historien, scharffsinnige Reden, und nützliche politische Regeln und Sprüchwörter [...]. Von Adamo Oleario in hochdeutscher Sprache zum andern mahle [...] herausgegeben. Schleswig, Johann Holwein f. Johann Naumann, 1660. Folio (195 x 295 mm). (44 [instead of 48]), 204, (12) pp. With 35 engravings in the text. (Bound after) II: Andersen, Jürgen / Iversen, Volquard. Orientalische Reisebeschreibunge (ed. by Adam Olearius). Schleswig, Johann Holwein, 1669. (12 [instead of 16]), 221 (instead of 223), (13) pp. With 19 (instead of 20) engravings in the text and a double-page-sized map. Contemp. vellum with ms. title to front cover.
  € 1,500
Second edition (first printed in 1654). The engravings illustrate Lokman's fables and stories as well as Saadi's verses with pretty scenes of Persian life. Wants engraved t. p., portrait, and beginning of dedication; text proper is complete. Several slight edge defects; corner loss to fol. E1 (not touching text). - Bound first is the first edition of these travel reports from the Near and Far East. The engravings show views from Ceylon, China, Indonesia, etc. Wants engraved t. p. and printed title (both supplied in photocopies) as well as pp. 65/66 (including an engraving). Some browning and brownstaining throughout. Bookplate of Thomas Christian Wöhler on front pastedown. (more)
  ¶ I: VD 17, 3:313596M. Dünnhaupt 24.2 (s.v. Olearius). Seebaß 687. Graesse VI/1, 212. Cf. Goedeke III, 65, 7 (first ed.). - II: VD 17, 3:602350C. Dünnhaupt 52 (s.v. Olearius). Böhme coll. 1519. Bircher B 12639.
 

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286 Said-Ruete, Rudolph. Die Al-Bu-Said-Dynastie in Arabien und Ostafrika. Vortrag gehalten in der Islamischen Abteilung dees 18. Internationalen Orientalisten-Kongresses zu Leiden, 8. September 1931. (Luzern, C. J. Bucher, 1932). 8vo. 36, (1) pp. With an original photo portrait and a double-page folding genealogical plate. Original stiff printed wrapper.
  € 350
One of 150 offprints from "Der Islam", vol. XX, issue 3 (August 1932). Inscribed to the publisher Paul Geuthner: "A Monsieur Paul Geuthner. Mit freundlichem Gruß in Wertschätzung. Dr. Said Ruete 1932". The author, who here discusses his ancestry, was the only son of the Hamburg merchant Heinrich Ruete and Emily Seyyida Salme (1844-1924), Princess of Oman and Zanzibar and daughter of the ruler Sayyid Said ibn Sultan (1791-1856). (more)
  ¶ OCLC 600828223.
 

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287 (Saintine, X[avier] B[oniface] [i. e. Joseph Xavier Boniface], ed.). Histoire scientifique et militaire de l'éxpedition française en Égypte. Paris, Dénain, 1830-1836. 10 text volumes bound in 11 (8vo) and 2 atlas vols. (oblong folio), altogether 13 vols. With a total of 300 engr. plates (13 folding, 2 in original hand colour, some with touches of colour) and 160 engr. portraits as well as 6 (1 folding) facsimiles, almost all on China paper. Green grained half morocco, spines gilt.
  € 65,000
First edition, almost never encountered complete as thus. Important source for the history and activities of the 1798 French expedition to Egypt, published in ten text volumes by Louis Reybaud and two atlas volumes. The portraits of the members of the expedition (usually forming part of the text volumes) have here been bound separately; also contains two additional portraits (not counted). "The 160 profile portraits by Dutertre [...] are of particular interest" (Blackmer). Many of the plates showing views, antiquities, maps etc. were engraved after drawings by Vivant Denon, whose work opened up the Middle East for western eyes as no other had done before (cf. Henze II, 50). - Plates numbered 1-309 (each of the 13 folding plates counting as a double), followed by "dernière planche" and 3 maps. Five of the facsimiles have been bound at the end of the second atlas volume, another in vol. 3. The text volumes contain the "Histoire ancienne" (vols. 1-2) and the "Histoire moderne de l'Égypte" (vols. 9-10) as well as the expedition report proper (vols. 3-8). All text volumes have four title pages (slightly departing from those in Blackmer's copy). Vol. 1 also contains a "Rapport" of the work for the Académie by G. Saint-Hilaire, dated Nov. 1836, which names Louis Reybaud as "principal rédacteur". - A magnificent set in period bindings, interior clean and spotless throughout. No complete copy recorded at auction within the last decades. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 1476. Gay 2209. Cf. Hage Chahine 4277 and Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 80 (both citing individual text volumes only).
 

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The history of Oman
288 Salîl-ibn-Razîk. History of the Imâms and Seyyids of ´Omân [...]. Translated from the original Arabic, and edited, with notes, appendices, and an introduction, [...] by George Percy Badger, F.R.G.S. London, Hakluyt Society, 1871. (16), CXXVIII, 435, (1) pp. With folding map. Original blue cloth with giltstamped cover vignette and spine title.
  € 4,500
First edition. - Salil ibn Ruzayq was the author of a manuscript given to George Percy Badger (1815-88), a member of the Bombay Commission reporting on the secession of Zanzibar, by the ruler of Oman, Seyyid Thuwayni. The manuscript chronicles the history of Oman from the adoption of Islam c. 661 CE until 1856. This volume, providing the first indigenous account of the history of Oman in English, contains the translation of the manuscript together with an analysis by Badger. The large folding map shows the north-eastern Arabian coastline from Basrah to Oman, including the regions occupied by the modern-day states of Qatar, Bahrain, and the United Arab Emirates, as well as a view of Muscat (with a more detailed inset map). - Paper brittle as usual; some repaired tears. Discharged from the Library of St. Paul's School (bookplate on front pastedown); previously in the library of president of the NY Metropolitan Museum of Art, Henry Gurdon Marquand (1819-1902; his bookplate on front flyleaf), whose art collection and library were sold in 1903. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibl. of the Arabian Peninsula, 450. Cox I, 258. OCLC 8109430. Cf. Fück 199. Not in Gay.
 

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Against Judaism, based on an Arabic tract
289 Samuel Abu Nasr Ibn Abbas. [Epistola contra Judaeorum errores]. [Naples, Francesco di Dino, 1478-1480]. 4to. 40 unnumbered ff., including first and final blanks. Roman type in single-column, 26 lines. Contemporary limp vellum.
  € 18,500
Rare Neapolitan incunable: an important polemical treatise against Judaism in the form of a letter written in the twelfth century by Rabbi Samuel Abu Nasr Ibn Abbas, a Moroccan Jew converted to Islam. The work was translated from Arabic into Latin in the fourteenth century by the Spanish Dominican Alfonso Buenhombre and became one of the flagships of anti-Semitic literature, reprinted for over two centuries, translated into several languages disseminated all over Europe. "Alphonsus Boni Hominis claims only to translate the Epistola of Rabbi Samuel but 'it seems he himself was the author, drawing largely from another tract in Arabic' (Encyclopaedia Judaica)" (ISTC). - Printing in Naples began only in 1471. Francesco di Dino, born in Florence, moved to Naples around 1474 and probably worked in the printing shop of Heinrich (Enrico) Alding. His activity as a printer in Naples is attested from 1478, when his name appears for the first time in "La divina dottrina di S. Caterina da Siena", on April 28. He remained in Naples until 1480 and during this period produced some five or seven volumes, some of which, such as this, do not mention his press. Some bibliographers have attributed this to the press of Georg Herolt in Rome. - Vellum wrinkled and shrunk; occasional brownstaining to the wide margins; insignificant worming near end. A good copy. (more)
  ¶ HC 14264*. Goff S-868. BMC VI 868. Proctor 349. Ohly-Sack 2516. IGI 8578. ISTC is00104800.
 

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290 (Sandys, George). A Relation of a Journey begun An. Dom. 1610. The third edition. London, Robert Allot, 1627. Folio (184 x 284 mm). (2), 309, (1) pp. With engr. title page, double-page-sized engr. map, folding plate, and 48 (2 full-page) engravings in the text. Signed 19th c. full calf binding by F. & T. Aitken with triple cover fillets and gilt spine. Marbled endpapers. All edges red.
  € 1,500
Third edition of this well-known travelogue, first published in 1615. "A work of note" (cf. Tobler). "Sandys, who travelled in 1610 and 1611, was regarded as a special authority throughout the 17th century. He is also well known for his paraphrases of the Psalms and his translations from Ovid" (Navari, Blackmer). The fine engravings show numerous views (including Jerusalem, Constantinople, La Valletta, and Naples), holy sites, plans, antiquities, and a few costumes. Includes the folding view of Constantinople (frequently lacking) and the folding map of the Mediterranean, which reaches as far as Mecca. - Binding professionally repaired. A few contemporary marginalia and underlinings. Old biographical note on the author on reverse of title page, edges trimmed rather closely (occasionally touching printed glosses). Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Howgego I, K26. Röhricht 923. Tobler 91. Cox I, 206. Graesse VI/1, 264. Cf. Blackmer 1484. Gay 2232 (2nd ed.).
 

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291 [Saudi Law]. Treaty of Friendship and Bon Voisinage between Trans-Jordan and Saudi Arabia. Signed at Jerusalem, 27th July, 1933 together with Protocol on arbitration and Schedule appended to Treaty. Ratifications exchanged at Cairo on 21st December, 1933. London, His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1934. 8vo. 10 pp. Modern binder.
  € 850
Friendship treaty between Saudi Arabia and Jordan, agreed at Jerusalem on 27 July 1933, between Abdul-Aziz Al Saud, King of Saudi Arabia, and Abdullah Ibn Hussein, Amir of Trans-Jordan. The treaty commits the two sides to cooperation and independent arbitration in dispute, clarifying special cases such as nomadic tribes accustomed to roaming both sides of the border. Trans-national raids and plunderings among Bedouins are to be resolved by "Certificates for the Return of Loot", "Blood Money" (homicide being calculated at "ten she-camels between two and four years of age"), and "Compensation for Losses". - Well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ Cmd. 4691. OCLC 14278870.
 

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292 [Saudi Arabia - Trade Agreement with Kuwait]. Treaty Series No. 14 (1947). Trade Agreement between the Government of the United Kingdom (acting on behalf of His Highness the Sheikh of Koweit) and the Government of Saudi Arabia. Jedda, 20th April, 1942. Ratifications exchanged at Jedda, 1st May, 1943. London, His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1947. 8vo. 4, 4 pp. Blue folder.
  € 250
Trade agreement regulating the trade of goods and the passage of commercial caravans between Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. In English and Arabic. - Title page stamped. Well-preserved. (more)
 

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293 [Saudi Arabia]. Memorandum on the Radio Telecommunication Scheme on the Occasion of the Project Inauguration by His Majesty the King. Mecca, Ministry of Communications, 1956. Large 4to (255 x 303 mm). (36) pp. With 6 mounted colour prints after watercolour drawings and numerous black-and-white illustrations. Original giltstamped green cloth.
  € 1,500
Exceedingly rare "memorandum", printed in Arabic and English throughout, documenting the telecommunication network scheme that was to modernise wireless telecommunications in Saudi Arabia, based on equipment manufactured and installed by the German engineering company Siemens & Halske. Also contains photoportraits of King Saud, Crown Prince Faisal (then Prime Minister, later to establish the first television broadcasting station in 1963), Prince Sultan (Minister of Communications), Sheikh Abdullah Al-Saad, Sheikh Ibrahim Silisilah, and Sheikh Abdullah Kazim, as well as maps, diagrams, and pictures of radio equipment in operation. - In perfect state of preservation. No copy listed in online library catalogues worldwide. (more)
 

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One of the earliest American descriptions of Arabia based on personal observation
294 Saunders, Daniel. A Journal of the travels and sufferings of Daniel Saunders, Jun. a Mariner on board the ship Commerce, of Boston, Samuel Johnson, Commander, which was cast away near Cape Morebet, on the Coast of Arabia, July 10 [...]. Salem, printed by Thomas C. Cushing, 1794. 16mo. 128, (16) pp. Contemp. calf, expertly rebacked to style, with leather label.
  € 3,800
First edition. - Saunders was second mate on board the "Grand Sachem" out of Salem on a voyage to the Cape of Good Hope in 1791. He received a discharge from that vessel's captain and transferred to the ship "Commerce" at Isle de France. The journal records a disaster off the coast of Arabia, and desperate wanderings in that country. Of the seventeen white persons aboard, only eight survived the ordeal. The fifteen-page appendix contains a general description of Arabia. This is the first edition, and would seem to be one of the earliest American descriptions of Arabia based on personal observation. - Occasional light foxing. Overall very good. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2014. Evans 22136. Sabin 77172.
 

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From the library of a sixteenth century statesman
295 (Scepper, Cornelius Duplicius). Rerum à Carolo V. Caesare Augusto in Africa bello gestarum commentarii, elegantißimis iconibus ad historiam accommodis illustrati. Antwerp, Jean Bellère, 1555. 8vo. (8), 183, (8) ff., last blank f. With woodcut printer's device on t. p. and three folding woodcut plates. (Bound after) II: Bruto, Giovanni Michele. De rebus a Carolo V. caesare Romanorum imperatore gestis, oratio. Ibid., 1555. (48) ff. With woodcut printer's device on t. p. and different, larger device on last f.; several woodcut initials. Contemp. limp vellum with ms label to spine. Traces of ties.
  € 6,500
Re-issue of the first edition, published the previous year. This documentation of the North African expeditions by Charles V against Tunis and the Arabian Coast was compiled by the Imperial envoy Scepper (d. 1554) from eyewitness accounts by Nicolas de Villegaignon and Juan Cristobal Calvete de Estrelle, augmented by extracts from Giovio and others. The remarkable views of sieges show the environs of Tunis as well as Algiers and El Kef (Aphrodisium). - Bound before that is the first edition of Bruto's first work, a polished prose encomium for Charles V, dedicated to his son, King Philip II of Spain. Giovanni Bruto (1515-94), a banished Italian scholar, spent a large part og his life traveling and was court historian to Emperors Rudolph II and Maximilian II. - Very clean, practically spotless copy. Title page of Bruto stamped; final flyleaf replaced by five modern blank leaves. With fine, contemporary acquisition note by the Austrian statesman and military commander Count Georg von Helfenstein-Gundelfingen (1518-73) on front pastedown, dated London, 1559 ("Emptus Lundini Angliae Metropol."), from the time of his diplomatic mission in Great Britain: "In 1558 Helfenstein was Imperial Governor of Upper Austria, in 1559 Prefect of the Imperial Court. At this time he was sent to England by Emperor Ferdinand to pursue a marriage between Ferdinand's third son, Archduke Charles, with Queen Elizabeth" (cf. ADB XI, 687). Later in the Fürstenberg Library in Donaueschingen. (more)
  ¶ I: BM-STC Dutch 183. Göllner 938. Paulitschke 355, Schottenloher 28.353. Graesse VI, 294. Palau 262.149. Gay 1376 ("précieux recueil"). Cf. Yerasimos 179. Not in Adams, Brunet or Kainbacher. - II: IA 126.080. Adams B 2973. BM-STC Dutch 43. Graesse I, 558. Palau 36.453. Brunet I, 1307 ("Peu commun").
 

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Secret accounts of the Turkish wars in Hungary
296 Schmettau, Friedrich Wilhelm Karl Gf. Historia arcana belli Turcici anni 1737, 38 et 39. Cum animadversionibus criticis [...]. E Gallico sermone in Latinum traduxit Michael Horvath. Tyrnau, typis Tyrnaviensibus, 1776. 8vo. XX, 324 pp. With woodcut title vignette. Contemp. calf with giltstamped spine label and attractively gilt spine. All edges red. Marbled endpapers.
  € 600
Second Latin edition of the "Memoires secrets de la guerre de Hongrie" (1771). 1771 had also seen the publication of the "Memoriae secretae belli hungarici annis 1737, 38, 39", of which a German edition was published in 1772 ("Geheime Nachrichten von dem Kriege in Ungarn in denen Feldzügen 1737, 1738 und 1739"). - The Prussian officer F. W. K. Gf. von Schmettau (1742-1806), a member of the military staff of Frederick the Great, was known for his topographical maps. For the translator, the Tyrnau theologian and professor of oratory Michael Horvath (1728-1810), cf. de Backer/S. IV, 470. - A pretty copy. (more)
  ¶ Petrik 1712-1860, III. OCLC 80119364. Cf. Atabey 1099 (2nd French ed.). Not in Apponyi or De Backer/Sommervogel.
 

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297 Seetzen, [Ulrich Jasper]. Voyage sur les confins de l'Arabie et de la Palestine. [Paris, Buisson, 1809]. 8vo. 137-190 pp. (With:) Mémoire pour servier a la conoissance des tribus Arabes en Syrie et dans l'Arabie Déserte et Pétrée. 281-324 pp. Modern marbled wrappers.
  € 850
Excerpts from vols. VII and VIII of the "Annales des voyages, de la géographie et de l'histoire". In these early 1806 reports, printed during Seetzen's ongoing expedition, Seetzen describes his travels in Syria, Jordan, Palestine, and Arabia. The Frisian-born naturalist and explorer U. J. Seetzen departed in 1802 on a thoroughly planned expedition through Asia Minor, the Arabian Peninsula and Africa. His last report is dated November 1810; he was killed near Tais in the Yemen on Sept. 8, 1811. - Clean and untrimmed. (more)
  ¶ Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2056. Gay 3601.
 

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298 Selden, John. De di[i]s Syris snytagmata II. Editio omnium novissima, opera Andreae Beyeri. Leipzig, Sigismund Cörner , 1668. 8vo. 2 vols. in one. (38), 373, (51) pp. (6), 338, (36) pp. With engr. t. p. (wants the table). Contemp. auburn morocco, richly gilt. All edges gilt.
  € 3,500
Third edition, the second edited by Andreas Beyer (first published in London in 1617). Selden (1584-1654) "first won fame in Europe as an orientalist by his treatise 'De Diis Syris', the first of his oriental studies [...] use was also made of it by Vossius in his great treatise on idiolatry" (DNB). - Elaborately bound gilt binding; insignificantly rubbed with minute restoration to upper spine-end. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 23:320175K. DNB 1161. Graesse VI/1, 343. Cf. STC S 1861.
 

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299 Seydi Ali Reis. Mirat ül-memalik. Asar-i eslafdan. Dersaadet (Istanbul), Ikdam Matbaasi, AH 1313 (AD 1895). 8vo. 99, (1) pp. Red half morocco with blindstamped cloth boards and giltstamped spine title in Ottoman Turkish.
  € 1,500
First and only edition in the Ottoman world. Sidi Ali Reis was an Ottoman admiral sent by Suleiman the Magnificent to counter Portuguese piracy and attacks on Muslim pilgrim ships in the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea, Red Sea and Arabian Gulf. He was shipwrecked in India and travelled to the Muslim states of South Asia, Afghanistan, central Asia, Iran, and the Middle East before returning to the Ottoman Empire. His travels are recounted in his present "Mirat ül-Memalik" ("The Mirror of Countries"), first published in 1557, one of the earliest travel books of Turkish literature and written in the now extinct Chagatai language. Rare: OCLC lists 3 copies only internationally (Leiden, Bamberg, Munich). (more)
  ¶ OCLC 632504491, 65818716.
 

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300 Shaw, Thomas. Reisen oder Anmerkungen verschiedene Theile der Barbarey und der Levante betreffend. Nach der zweyten engländischen Ausgabe ins Deutsche übersezt. Leipzig, Bernhard Christoph Breitkopf & Sohn, 1765. Large 4to. (20), 424, (22) pp. With 20 (4 folding) engr. plates and 12 (8 folding) engr. maps. Later marbled half vellum with ms. title to spine.
  € 2,000
First German edition, translated by J. H. Merck. "Has been praised by Dibdin and others. It is especially esteemed for its botanical and zoological plates, in addition to the information Shaw imparts on the antiquities, geology and geography of the areas he visited" (Navari, Blackmer). "Cet ouvrage est estimé tant pour ses observations relatives à l'histoire naturelle, que pour son exactitude. L'auteur visita pendant douze ans l'Afrique septentrionale" (Gay). "During the period of his chaplaincy to the English factory at Algiers from 1720 to 1733, Shaw travelled in Egypt, Palestine, Cyprus and through much of North Africa. His work is valuable for its accurate descriptions of antiquities, geography and the natural history specimens he observed" (Aboussouan). Shaw (1694-1751) was professor of Greek at Oxford. The maps show parts of Arabia, the Mediterranean, and the environs of Algiers and Tunis. - Binding somewhat rubbed; some browning throughout due to paper; a large tear to one plate repaired. 1840 ownership "A. Lutz" to flyleaf; armorial bookplate "S. G. Koenig, V.D.M." to pastedown. Later in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Howgego I, S92. Weber II, 501. Gay 391. Röhricht 1352. Tobler 124. Nissen, ZBI 3840. Chatzipanagioti-S. 1028. Cf. Blackmer 1533-1535. Aboussouan 842. Graesse V, 362.
 

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301 [Siege of Vienna]. Relation veritable du siège de Vienne. Lyon, Thomas Amaulry, 1684. 12mo. (8), 159 pp. With folding engr. portrait and folding engr. plan. Contemp. calf.
  € 3,500
First edition of this account of the 1683 Turkish siege of Vienna. The portrait shows Count Starhemberg. Owner's stamp to title page. Includes an additional engraving, captioned by a contemporary hand: "Mort du Grand Vizir, étranglé par l’ordre de Mehemed 4 pour n’avez pas pris Vienne". Old cancelled stamps. A clean, well-preserved copy, formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Sturminger 2449. Kábdebo II, 182 ("1683" in error, not seen or located). Cf. Graesse VI/1, 76 (Brussels, 1684).
 

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The first Hajj narrative published by a woman
302 Sikandar Begam, Nawab of Bhopal. A pilgrimage to Mecca. Translated from the original Urdu, and edited by Mrs. Willoughby-Osborne. Followed by historical sketch of the reigning family of Bhopal, by Lieut.-Col. Willoughby-Osborne [...] And an appendix translated by the Rev. William Wilkinson. London, William H. Allen & Co., 1870. 8vo. XII, 241, (1) pp. With 13 original photos mounted on plates (one a portrait frontispiece). Contemp. half calf with giltstamped spine title and seal of the New South Wales Library of Parliament stamped on front cover. All edges and endpapers marbled.
  € 8,500
First edition of the first Hajj narrative by a woman. Definitely the rarest of the 19th-century pilgrimage accounts: no copy recorded at auction within the last decades. The author's unpublished Urdu manuscript was translated by the wife of a British colonial officer, printed in a very small press run and illustrated by original photographs. Sikandar Begam, who ruled the Indian state of Bhopal as Nawab Begum from 1860 to 1868, was the first Muslim woman to publish an account of her pilgrimage to Mecca (undertaken in 1864). Her critical and often surprising description of Arabia provides a unique insight into the factors that went into writing this quintessentially Muslim journey in a colonial environment. At the dinner hosted by the Sharif of Mecca, the Begum criticised the corruption of the Ottoman Hajj administration and the unsafe roads on which roaming bandits would attack pilgrims. Her granddaughter Sultan Jahan Begam also wrote a book about her own pilgrimage experience, which was published in 1909 and is much more common. Contains a dozen historic photographs of Bhopal and the ruling family. A second edition was published at Calcutta in 1906. - Variously browned and brownstained throughout, but still a nice copy from the New South Wales parliament library. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1302. Hajj Travel Narratives, 282. In: Hajj. Journey to the heart of Islam. London, British Museum 2012. pkpk
 

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303 Siksek, Simon G. The Legal Framework For Oil Concessions in The Arab World. Beirut, The Middle East Research and Publishing Center, 1960. 8vo. (12), 140 pp. Publisher's giltstamped green cloth with original dustjacket.
  € 650
First edition (= Middle East Oil Monographs 2). "In recent years, it has been increasingly felt that the legal principles governing oil concession contracts in the Arab world are in need of further clarification [... Here,] a prominent Arab lawyer [...] examines the [...] fundamental questions which must be answered if oil concession contracts are to attain the required degree of legal stability" (publisher's blurb). - In excellent condition. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 1538579.
 

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304 Sionita, Gabriel. Arabia, seu Arabum vicinarumque gentium Orientalium leges, ritus, sacri et profani mores, instituta et historia: accedunt praeterea varia per Arabiam itinera, in quibus multa notatu digna enarrantur [...]. Amsterdam, Johann Jansson, 1633. 12mo. 297 (but: 287) pp. With engr., illustrated title page. Contemp. limp vellum with traces of ties.
  € 650
First edition of the collection. Contains: 1. Sionita & Hesronita. De nonnullis orientalibus urbium. "This important work contains early descriptions of Baghdad, Bokhara, Damascus, Medina, Mecca, and Aleppo" (Blackmer). 2. "De moribus atque institutis Turcarum" by the French diplomat C. Richier. 3. W. Drechsler's "Historia Arabum". - Slight worming to first pages; some waterstaining near end. Contemporary ink ownership to pastedown: "Ex libris Bibliothecae S. Dominici Ferrariae"; old stamp to first half-title. An appealing little volume. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2084 (erroneously "1653"). Blackmer 1544 (note). Weber II, 697. Gay 3452 (erroneously 1653). Hage Chahine 4533.
 

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305 Sionita, Gabriel. Arabia, seu Arabum vicinarumque gentium Orientalium leges, ritus, sacri et profani mores, instituta et historia: accedunt praeterea varia per Arabiam itinera, in quibus multa notatu digna enarrantur [...]. Amsterdam, Willem & Jan Blaeu, 1635. 12mo. 247, (1) pp. With engr., illustrated title page. Contemp. vellum.
  € 600
Second edition of this collection; a reprint of the 1633 Jansson edition. Contains: 1. Sionita & Hesronita. De nonnullis orientalibus urbium. "This important work contains early descriptions of Baghdad, Bokhara, Damascus, Medina, Mecca, and Aleppo" (Blackmer). 2. "De moribus atque institutis Turcarum" by the French diplomat C. Richier. 3. W. Drechsler's "Historia Arabum". - Slightly browned throughout. (more)
  ¶ Gay 3452 (year mis-stated as "1653"). OCLC 69059126. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2084. Hage Chahine 4533. Blackmer 1544 (note). Schnurrer 188 (first ed. 1633).
 

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306 Skinner, [Thomas]. Adventures During a Journey Overland to India, by Way of Egypt, Syria, and the Holy Land. London, Richard Bentley, 1836. 8vo. 2 vols. XI, (1), 324 pp. XI, (1), 291, (1) pp. With 2 engr. frontispieces (portrait and view of the Lake of Tiberias). Contemp. calf with triple giltstamped cover fillets and blindstamped ornamental borders, leading edges gilt, inner dentelle gilt, spines rebacked to style with giltstamped label. Marbled endpapers; all edges marbled.
  € 1,500
First edition. - An account of a journey made in 1833 through Egypt, the Holy Land, Syria, Mesopotamia (Baghdad, Babylon and Basrah), Persia, down the Arabian Gulf (stopping at Muscat, "the hottest place on earth") and thence to India. - Corners bumped; frontispieces foxed. Attractively bound copy; armorial bookplates ("Gadsden", motto "decrevi") to pastedowns; contemporary ownership "C. J. Wilton" to flyleaf. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 1547. Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 237. Röhricht 1808. OCLC 4255403. Cf. Atabey 1142 (1837 second ed.).
 

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307 [Slave Trade]. Slave Trade. No. 1 (1876). Correspondence Respecting the Reception of Fugitive Slaves on Board Her Majesty's Ships. Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of Her Majesty. London, Harrison & Sons, 1876. Folio (320 x 205 mm). V, (1), 47, (1) pp. Sewn.
  € 1,500
Fascinating documentary material on the ramifications of international law concerning British treatment of runaway slaves in the Arabian Gulf region: in an official letter to the local Political Resident, the commanding officer of a British vessel crusing between Bahrein, Bubai, Abu Dhabi, and Sharjah inquires "what [he is] to do with the slave" who swam on board from one of the pearl boats on anchor under the Island of Zukool (6 Sept. 1873) - then a common problem, discussed extensively by the Admiralty, governors, consuls and commanders. - Paginated "257-309" by a contemporary hand. Final two leaves show some fraying to edge, otherwise well preserved. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 235891870.
 

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Slavery and all the Sheikhs of the Trucial Coast
308 [Slavery - British Maritime Legal Proceedings]. Correspondence respecting Sir Bartle Frere's mission to the East Coast of Africa. 1872-73. London, Harrison & Sons, 1873. Folio (215 x 332 mm). IV, 156 pp. With a large coloured folding map. (Bound with) II: Royal Commission on Fugitive Slaves. Report of the Commissioners, Minutes of the Evidence, and Appendix. London, G. E. Eyre & W. Spottiswoode, 1876. LXXXV, (1), 71, (72)-251, (1) pp. Contemp. marbled half calf with giltstamped red and green spine labels. All edges red.
  € 25,000
Two extremely rare works on the British Foreign Office's attempts to suppress the slave trade on the east coast of Arabia and Africa and especially in the dominions of the Sultan of Zanzibar. Includes full source documentation of Frere's 1872-73 mission, with the translated text of the letters sent by local rulers (including Sheikh Zayed bin Khalifah of Abu Dhabi, Hamad ben Rashed of Ajman, Evan ben Ali Al Khalifa of Bahrein, Husheer bin Mahtum of Dubai, Haji Abder Rahman, British Agent at Sharjah, etc.) and a detailed and dated map of the coasts visited by the mission. OCLC located five copies worldwide, none in the U.S. - The almost unobtainable Commission Report contains not only examinations of Commanders who had visited the Gulf and could provide accounts of pearl fishing by Bahraini slaves (p. 27), but also the rare appendix (pp. 73-251), "Memorandum on the Treaties concluded by Great Britain with Powers still owning Slaves for the Suppression of the Slave Trade", not present in Oxford or the British Library. This contains, inter alia, the full text of the treaties signed with the Chiefs Hassan Bin Rama, Sultan Bin Sugger, the Sheikh of Dubey, Sheikh Shakbool, Hassan Bin Ali, and Synd Suif Bin Hamood of Sohar (Oman); separate agreements were entered into with Zanzibar and Muscat. - Occasional slight brownstaining, as common, but a very fine, appealingly bound copy, formerly in the Foreign Office library with their blindstamp to endpapers. (more)
  ¶ I: OCLC 66300585. - II: OCLC 863518846.
 

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309 Smith, W. Robertson. Kinship and Marriage in Early Arabia. Cambridge, University Press, 1885. 8vo. XIV, 322, (2) pp. Original brown cloth with giltstamped title to spine.
  € 1,000
First edition of the standard work by W. Robertson Smith, Lord Almoner's Professor of Arabic at Cambridge. - Removed from the Harvard College Library (with duplicate stamp). A single ink marking in the margin, otherwise fine. Remains of shelfmark labels. Another copy sold for £1,500 at Sotheby's in 1998 (Oct 14, lot 1125: some underlining of text & marks in margins). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1921. Fück 210. OCLC 2156214.
 

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Earliest photographs of Mecca and its pilgrims
310 Snouck Hurgronje, Christian. Mekka. Den Haag, Nijhoff, 1888-1889. 2 text volumes and 1 volume of plates ("Bilder-Atlas"). XIII, 228, (2) pp. With 2 maps and 3 genealogical tables. XVIII, 393, (4) pp. With 4 chromolithogr. plates, 6 (1 double-sized) toned lithogr. plates, and 65 mounted photographs on 30 plates; 1 f. of contents. Contemp. half calf with gilt title to spine. Large 8vo (250 x 175 mm). Plates stored in contemp. half cloth folder with cover label. Folio (380 x 285 mm).
  € 18,500
Remarkable set, rarely encountered complete with the plate volume, issued in merely 100 copies. The Dutch orientalist Snouck spent a year in Mecca and Jeddah during the years 1884/85 and married a lady from Mecca. He was the first non-Muslim to visit the city outside the annual pilgrimage. The photographs, taken by himself and by an Arabic physician, are among the earliest to show Mecca and its pilgrims. - Slight browning to photographs' backing cardboards. The vintage photographs, much sought as the earliest photographic documents of the city, its dignitaries and its pilgrims, are preserved in perfect condition. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibl. of the Arabian Peninsula, 233 & 1239. Henze V, 177. Dinse 443. pkpk

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20 original photographs of Mekka by the "earliest Arabian photographer"
311 Snouck Hurgronje, Christian. Bilder aus Mekka. Leiden, E. J. Brill, 1889. Folio (365 x 268 mm). 20 albumen prints mounted on 18 leaves, text comprising half-title, title, preface, and list of plates, loose as issued in pictorial gilt cloth, rubbed and faded at extremities.
  € 65,000
According to F. E. Peters (cf. below), the present portfolio is one of the earliest photographic documents of Mecca and the Hajj, preceded only by the photographs of Muhammed Sadiq Bey published in 1881 (Sotheby's, 4 June 1998: £1,250,000). "Following the publication of 'Bilderatlas zu Mekka', Hurgronje received a letter from his doctor in Makkah, whom he had taught the art of photography. The letter contained new photographs of the hajj which were of such great interest that he decided in 1889 to publish his 'Bilder aus Mekka' [...] The photographs provide an insight into the world of Makkah's inhabitants, pilgrims from all over the Islamic world, in addition to the sharif of Makkah, the Turkish governor, and various religious and secular figures" (Badr el-Hage, p. 46f.). "In 1981 F. H. S. Allen and C. Gavin first identified the earliest Arabian photographer by deciphering his elaborately calligraphed signatures, which without exception had been erased from the plates reproduced by Snouck Hurgronje: 'Futugrafiyat al-Sayyid 'Abd al-Ghaffar, tabib Makka' (The Photography of the Sayyid Abd al-Ghaffar, physican of Mecca). This princely eye surgeon had been host to the young Snouck in Mecca immediately after the Dutchman's conversion to Islam. Snouck claimed to have taught his host how to use a camera and attributes to him (without ever mentioning his name) the pictures reproduced in 'Bilder aus Mekka'". - Very rare; only two copies established at auctions internationally during the past decades (the last at Sotheby's [2006] was incomplete, lacking all the text leaves). Text leaves somewhat browned; boards slightly wavy. The albumen prints are in perfect condition, showing fine contrast. Original cloth portfolio somewhat bumped at edges and corners. (more)
  ¶ Badr el-Hage, Saudi Arabia Caught in Time. Reading, 1997. F. E. Peters. The Muslim Pilgrimage to Mecca and the Holy Place. Princeton University Press 1996. pkpk
 

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312 Snouck Hurgronje, C[hristian]. Mekka in the Latter Part of the 19th Century. Daily Life, Customs and Learning. Leyden & London, E. J. Brill & Luzac, 1931. Large 8vo. VI, 309, (3) pp. With 20 half-tone plates, folding plan of Mecca, and plan of the Haram. Original blue cloth.
  € 750
First English edition of the 2-volume German work published in 1888-89. The Dutch orientalist Snouck spent a year in Mecca and Jeddah during 1884/85 and was married to a Mecca woman. He was the first non-Muslim to visit the city outside the annual pilgrimage. The photographs, taken by himself and an Arabic physician, are among the earliest to show Mecca and its pilgrims. - Slight wear to spine-ends; interior slightly browned, but clean and well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 1238. OCLC 1088989. Cf. Fück 231.
 

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313 Sonnini de Manoncourt, Charles Nicolas Sigisbert. Reisen in Ober- und Niederägypten. Aus dem Französischen. Mit Anmerkungen und einem Sachregister. Leipzig & Gera, Heinsius, 1800. 8vo. 2 vols. XXIV, 453, (3) pp. XXXVIII, 534, (2) pp. With 13 folding engr. plates and 2 folding tables. Contemp. marbled boards with giltstamped spine labels.
  € 1,500
First German edition of this account of travels in Upper and Lower Egypt, translated from the French original of the naturalist Charles Sonnini de Manoncourt (1751-1812), who had visited Egypt, Turkey, and Greece in 1777-78. The plates show landscapes, plants, fish, and antiquities. - Binding slightly bumped at extremeties; slight browning throughout. Titles stamped ("Institut für Grenz- und Auslandstudien"). (more)
  ¶ Fromm 24495. Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 245. Kainbacher 398. Cox I, 395. Graesse VI/1, 439. Cf. Gay 2250 (1799 French ed.).
 

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The first person ever to photograph the Holy Cities
314 Soubhy, Saleh. Pèlerinage à la Mecque et à Médine. Précédé d'un aperçu sur l'islamisme et suivi de considérations générales au point de vue sanitaire et d'un appendice sur la circoncision. Cairo, Imprimerie nationale, 1894. Large 8vo. 129, (2) pp. With 19 plates. Marbled half calf with giltstamped title to spine.
  € 7,500
A complete copy with appendix and all plates, includes 4 photographic views of Mecca, 3 of Medina and 3 of Jeddah (after Sadiq Bey and others). Salih Subhi, an Egyptian public health official, was commissioned by his government to undertake the Hajj in 1888 and 1894. Here he describes the eight-month journey in great detail. Muhammed Sadiq Bey was a major pioneer in the history of Arabian photography and the first person ever to photograph the Holy Cities of Mecca and Medina. - Browned throughout due to paper. Rare, the last copy on the market fetched £27,500 (Christie's, April 13 2010, lot 276, with author's inscription), the Burrell copy fetched £8,000 in 1999 (complete, but in modern cloth). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2096. Auboyneau/Fevret 20. OCLC 7055812.
 

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315 Soubhy, Saleh. Pèlerinage à la Mecque et à Médine. Précédé d'un aperçu sur l'islamisme et suivi de considérations générales au point de vue sanitaire et d'un appendice sur la circoncision. Cairo, Imprimerie nationale, 1894. Large 8vo. 109 (instead of 129), (2) pp. With 16 (instead of 19) plates. Marbled half calf with giltstamped title to spine.
  € 2,500
Includes 4 photographic views of Mecca, 3 of Medina and 3 of Jeddah (after Sadiq Bey and others), wants only the ten-leaf appendix, 2 portraits and the plate showing the departure of the Mahmal in Cairo. - Salih Subhi, an Egyptian public health official, was commissioned by his government to undertake the Hajj in 1888 and 1894. Here he describes the eight-month journey in great detail. Muhammed Sadiq Bey was a major pioneer in the history of Arabian photography and the first person ever to photograph the Holy Cities of Mecca and Medina. - Browned throughout due to paper. Our copy without the ten-leaf appendix before the author's epilogue and portrait. - Rare, the last copy on the market fetched £27,500 (Christie's, April 13 2010, lot 276, with author's dedication), the Burrell copy fetched £8,000 in 1999 (complete, but in modern cloth). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2096. Auboyneau/Fevret 20. OCLC 7055812.
 

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316 Sousa, Joao de. Vestigios da lingua arabica em Portugal, ou lexicon etymologico das palavras, e nomes portuguezes, que tem origem Arabica. Lisbon, Officina da Academia Real das Sciencias, 1789. 4to. XX, 160 pp. Modern reddish-brown buckram with gilt lettering to spine.
  € 1,800
First edition of the first etymological dictionary of Portuguese words with Arabic origins, written by one of the leading Arabic scholars of 18th-century Portugal. - From the library of the Royal Society of London (with its cancellation stamp), to which it had been presented by Sir Joseph Banks (with presentation mark). (more)
  ¶ Schnurrer 129. Zaunmüller 310. Vater/Jülg 291. Graesse VI/1, 454. OCLC 493424506. Cf. Aboussouan 850 (1830 edition only). Streit 17, p. 315, n. 6441 (1830 edition only).
 

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317 [Speer, Daniel]. Zwey nachdänkliche Traum-Gesichte, von dess Türcken Untergang. Zweifels ohn von göttlicher Direction. Herauss gelassen von mehrmals zugetroffen erfahrnem Designante Somniatore. [Ulm, Matthäus Wagner, 1684]. 4to. (2), "31" (= 29), (1) pp. With engraved frontispiece (an allegory of the 1683 Ottoman defeat) and headpieces. Side-stitched in modern wrappers, green edges.
  € 4,500
Rare pamphlet describing two dreams supposedly predicting the fall of the Ottoman Empire. It was written by the German composer and novelist Daniel Speer (1636-1707) under the pseudonym "Designante Somniatore" and opens with some remarks on prophetic dreams with reference to the Old Testament. Speer's pamphlet, written immediately after the 1683 Battle of Vienna, expresses a deep-seated fear of the Ottoman Empire, which, thrusting into the heart of Europe, seemed a serious threat to Christianity. With manuscript annotation on the back of the frontispiece by "Joannes Jacobus Hausmohr", 1685, and contemporary ownership of the Salzburg Theological Seminary ("Ex libris Seminarij Salisb.") on title page. In good condition. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 3:310364C. Not in Atabey or Blackmer.
 

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318 Spencer-Smith, J[ohn]. Précis d'une dissertation sur un monument arabe du moyen age en Normandie. Seconde édition. Caen, Chalopin fils, [1827]. 8vo. 27, (1) pp. With 5 engraved plates by F. Berthout, Caen, and woodcut vignette of the Académie de Caen on reverse of t. p. Original printed wrappers.
  € 350
Second edition (first printed in 1820), with several illustrations published here for the first time. No. 237 of 300 copies. Rare treatise by John Spencer Smith (1769-1845), an "extrait du procès-verbal de la séance du 14 avril 1820", about the famous Chasuble of Saint-Regnobert preserved at the Cathedral of Bayeux, and about the Cufic-inscribed ivory chest, supposedly part of the Saracen spoils taken by Charles Martel, in which it is stored. The engravings show the chasuble as well as the chest and many details of the inscriptions. The original edition, published by Le Roy in 1820, contained merely a frontispiece and a single text illustration. - Wrapper torn at upper spine end. Binding loosened; significant browning to final quires. With the errata slip bound at the end. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 27973008.
 

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Extremely rare Life of Muhammad
319 Sprenger, A[loys]. The life of Mohammad from original sources. Allahabad, Presbyterian Mission Press, 1851. 8vo. 210 pp. Original wrappers.
  € 3,500
Exceedingly rare Indian-printed work; the English-language nucleus of what was to become the author's chef d'oeuvre (in German) a decade later. It was in the quest for materials for this work that Sprenger travelled extensively in Egypt, Syria, and Mesopotamia (cf. DNB). From the collection of the orientalist Wilhelm Ahlwardt (1828-1909) with his autogr. ownership to front wrapper. No copy in the Austrian National Library. - The Austrian-born orientalist Aloys Sprenger (1813-93) studied medicine and natural sciences as well as oriental languages at Vienna, receiving tutelage from Hammer-Purgstall but failing to be accepted into the Oriental Academy, open only to the nobility. In 1836 he moved to London, where he worked with the Graf von Münster on the latter's "History of Military Science among the Muslim Peoples", and thence in 1843 to Calcutta. In 1848 he was sent to Lucknow, to prepare a catalogue of the royal library there, the first volume of which appeared in 1854. In 1850 Sprenger was named examiner, official government interpreter, and secretary of the Asiatic Society of Calcutta. He published many works while holding this latter position, among them "Dictionary of the Technical terms used in the sciences of the Musulmans" (1854) and "Ibn Hajar's biographical dictionary of persons who knew Mohammed" (1856). Sprenger took a position as professor of oriental languages at the University of Bern in 1857, moving in 1881 to Heidelberg. His voluminous collection of Arabic, Persian, Hindustani and other manuscripts and printed material was eventually acquired by the Prussian State Library in Berlin. Several of his editions remain the standard Received Text. Although never having taught or worked in Austria, Sprenger is considered a typical example of the Austrian school of oriental studies, traditionally aiming for a better understanding of the Middle-Eastern peoples (cf. ÖBL XIII, 49). "Sprenger was not only an ardent and successful book-collector [...] He is said to have acquired a good practical knowledge of no less than twenty-five languages. While in the north of India he was an enthusiastic mountaineer, and, though he did not grapple with the difficult subject of old Arabic geography until he was over sixty, he dealt with it with an insight and acumen that seemed almost instinctive" (DNB). He is remembered as one of the most prominent orientalists of the 19th century. - Of the utmost rarity; no copy in auction records. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin XI, p. 113, no. 388. Pfannmüller 166, 180 ff. Fück 176 ff. Wurzbach XXXVI, 262. DNB XVIII, 833f. pkpk

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320 (Stampini, Ettore [ed.]). Feriis saecularibus R. Athenaei Taurinensis. A.D. VI Kal. Nov. an. MDCCCCVI. [Torino, Vigliardi-Paravia], 1906. Folio (262 x 358 mm). 35, (1) pp. With 9 plates. Original wrappers printed in red, stored loosely within original dedicatory giltstamped cloth portfolio with white moirée endpapers.
  € 2,500
Handsome facsimile publication produced on the occasion of the centenary of the University of Turin (27 October 1906), under the editorship of the professor of philosophy Ettore Stampini (1855-1930) for the Academic Council. Dedication copy for Sultan Abdülhamid II (1842-1918), the 99th caliph of Islam and the 34th sultan of the Ottoman Empire. The Sultan was to be deposed in 1909; but two years later, Italy and the Ottoman Empire would go to war over Libya. - Rather strongly browned throughout, as usual; still a good copy with fine provenance. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 16164614.
 

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321 Stiffe, Arthur W. [Trading Centres of the Persian Gulf]. [London, Royal Geographical Society], 1899-1900. 8vo. pp. 293-298 and 211-216 of the Geographical Journal of 1899 and 1900, respectively. With an illustration of the Mausolia near Bandar Abbas. Offprints in modern wrappers.
  € 650
Parts 5 and 6 of Stiffe's account of former and ancient trading centres of the Arabian Gulf, treating Kung (pp. 294-297, 1899) and Bandar 'Abbas (211-215, 1900), both on the Persian coast. Well-preserved. (more)
  ¶ Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2135 (vols IV and VII).
 

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The Arabian Gulf, and all the country of the tent-dwellers and the Sheikh-governed tribes
322 Strabo. En tibi lector studiose Strabonis geographicorum co[m]me[n]tarios, olim a Guarino Veronese, & Gregorio Trifernate latinitate donatus, iam vero denuo a Conrado Heresbachio ad fidem graeci exemplaris [...] recognitos. Basel, (Valentin Curio), (March) 1523. Folio (220 x 325 mm). (36), 566, (2) pp. With woodcut title border by J. Faber after Hans Holbein, 2 additional borders, printer's device, and numerous initials. Blindstamped limp leather on four raised bands.
  € 9,500
Early Latin translation of the geography of Strabo, who had visited Egypt and sailed up the Nile in 25 BC. - Even in the introductory chapters, Strabo provides important details on the Arabian Peninsula: "Adjoining the Ethiopians, a needy and nomad race, is Arabia: one part of which is distinguished above all other lands by the title of Felix [i.e., Hedjaz and Nejd-ed-Ared], and the other, though not dignified by that name, is both generally believed and also said to be pre-eminently blessed. Though Homer knew of Arabia Felix, at that time it was by no means wealthy, but a wild country, the inhabitants of which dwelt for the most part in tents. It is only a small district which produces the aromatics from which the whole territory afterwards received its name, owing to the rarity of the commodity amongst us, and the value set upon it. That the Arabians are now flourishing and wealthy is due to their vast and extended trade" (p. 30f.); "Arabia Felix is bounded by the entire Arabian and Persian Gulfs, together with all the country of the tent-dwellers and the Sheikh-governed tribes. [...] Beside the ocean the country is tolerably fitted for habitation of man, but not so the centre of the country: this for the most part is barren, rugged sand desert. The same applies to the country of the Troglodytic Arabians and the part occupied by the fish-eating tribes" (p. 90f.) Furthermore, chapters 15 and 16 are devoted entirely to the Orient (chapter 16 on Arabia in particular), while the final chapter 17 discusses Egypt and Libya. - The fine title border shows King Solomon among the philosophers and poets of Greco-Roman antiquity; at the bottom, the Nine Muses lay a wreath on the head of Homer. Occasional insignificant brownstaining. The uncommon binding is slightly rubbed; some edge defects professionally restored. Title page has contemporary ms. ownership of the classical scholar Johannes Lyresius from Kleve, professor of Greek at Ingolstadt from 1568 onwards. A few marginalia and underlinings by his and later hands. (more)
  ¶ VD 16, S 9346. Hoffmann III, 457. Schweiger I, 304. Cf. Macro 2148 (only later English translations).
 

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323 [Arabian Gulf]. Stürken, Alfred. Reisebriefe aus dem Persischen Golf und Persien. In: Mitteilungen der Geographischen Gesellschaft in Hamburg. Bd. XII. Hamburg, L. Friederichsen & Co., 1907. 8vo. (4), 244 pp., Reisebriefe: pp. (69)-124. With 28 illustrations on 20 plates. 5 folding maps. Original printed wrappers.
  € 950
First edition. - In 1905 the Hamburg merchant Alfred Stürken (1868-1925) undertook a voyage to India. The following year, his return route led him through the Arabian Gulf, to Oman, Bahrein and Kuwait. He published the diary of this return journey, amply illustrated by photographs, in the Proceedings of the Hamburg Geographical Society. - Wrappers somewhat dusty and frayed. An uncut, untrimmed copy; well preserved. (more)
  ¶ Cf. OCLC 1604285.
 

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324 Sudi, Süleyman. Defter-i muktesid. [Istanbul], Mahmud Bey Matbaasi, [1889-1890]. 3 vols. in 1. (2), 142, (4), 144, (6), 208, (2) pp. Original half leather. 4to.
  € 850
First edition of the "Notebook of the Economist", a still much-quoted Turkish publication on the fiscal structure of the Ottoman Empire. - Rubbed at spine and corners. Slight brownstaining, otherwise in good condition. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 40382408.
 

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325 Tadjbakhche, Gholam-Reza. La question des Iles Bahrein. Paris, (A. Boisseau in Toulouse for) A. Pedone, 1960. Large 8vo. XVI, 389, (1) pp. With 2 folding maps. Original printed boards with half cloth library spine.
  € 500
(= Publications de la Revue générale de droit international public, nouv, sér., no 1). History of Bahrain, with special attention to the international legal, political, and diplomatic problems which haunted the region in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Contains "documents-annexes", including treaties and diplomatic correspondence. Based on the author's thesis. - Untrimmed, uncut copy. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 7627011. Not in Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula.
 

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326 Tamisier, Maurice. Voyage en Arabie. Séjour dans le Hedjaz. Campagne d'Assir. Paris, Louis Desessart, 1840. 8vo. 2 pts. in 1 vol. (4), 399, (1) pp. (4), 402 pp. With folding engr. map. Contemp. marbled half calf with giltstamped title to spine.
  € 2,800
First edition; rare. - The work of a sympathetic observer who made an extraordinary journey. Tamisier accompanied the Egyptian forces to Arabia in 1833/34 as chief of the Medical Corps. Bearded and in Arab dress, he visited areas never seen by a westerner before. The author describes Jeddah and the pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina from different parts of the Muslim world, as well as Ta’if, the Asir region, the Bedouins of Outeiba and Khamis Moushait, etc. Tamisier was offered the post of secretary to the chief medical officer of the punitive expedition against the Wahhabis. He focuses on the country he saw and the people he encountered on his journey from Jeddah into the Nejd and south to the borders of Yemen, taking particular interest in the medical conditions of the populace. - Binding slightly rubbed. The Burrell copy fetched £2,000 at Sotheby's in 1999 (lot 801). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2163. Weber IV, 279. Gay 3608. NYPL Arabia coll. 172. OCLC 2569222. Not in Atabey or Blackmer.
 

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The first Book about America by a Muslim
327 Tarikh al-Hindi al-Gharbi. Tarikh al-Hind al-Garbi al-müsemma bi-Hadis-i nev [A History of the Western Indies]. Qustantaniyah (Istanbul), Ibrahim Müteferrika, mid-Ramazan 1142 AH [= 1730 AD]. 4to (213 x 163 mm). (3), 91 ff. With 4 double-page engraved plates (celestial chart, diagram with table, 2 world maps) and 13 woodcut illustrations in the text. Papered spine. Loosely inserted in period-style giltstamped full calf binder with fore-edge flap.
  € 175,000
Rare first edition of this illustrated history of the New World in Ottoman Turkish: the first book published in Turkey to contain illustrations, the oldest book about the New World published in the Ottoman Empire, and one of the first titles printed by a Muslim in Turkey. "Although ascribed in Turkish bibliographies to one Mehmed Ibn Hasan üs-Su'udi, the authorship is uncertain [...] Despite the title, this is not a history of the West Indies. It opens with a general geographical and cosmological discussion, and follows with an account of the discovery of the New World, with considerable fantastic elaboration in the spirit of the more fabulous passages of Abu Hamid and Qazwini. Among the illustrations are depictions of trees whose fruits are in human form, long-snouted horses, mermen at battle with land-dwellers, and other men and beasts of nightmarish aspect" (Watson). The present work, which survives in a number of mss. (though in less complete variants than this printed edition), was composed in Istanbul around 1580 by an unidentified author. After a synthesis of Islamic geographical and cosmographical writings (notably drawing from al-Mas'udi, who is the most frequently cited source, and Ibn al-Wardi, mentioned almost 20 times), the book relates the discovery of the New World. It is this Chapter 3, which comprises the final two thirds of the text, in which the author describes the explorations and discoveries by Columbus, Balboa, Magellan, Cortés and Pizarro. As Goodrich's study of the Tarih-i Hind-i garbi's sources shows, this section is derived directly from Italian editions of 16th-century texts - particularly works by López de Gómara, Peter Martyr, Agustín de Zárate, and Oviedo - which the author excerpted, rearranged, and translated into Turkish. The history of their discoveries is enlivened with fantastic elaboration, some of which is visible in the woodcuts. The two world maps derive from those in Mercator-Hondius "Atlas minor" and reappear in Katib Celebi's Cihânnümâ atlas, printed by Müteferrika two years later, with California represented as an island. Complete copies are rare: the book was printed in an edition of only 500 copies, many of which were subsequently defaced or destroyed for contravening the Islamic dictum against representing living things. Toderini seems to have called for an astronomical chart in addition to the 4 plates, but Watson describes an astronomical chart and 3 plates. Sabin calls for 3 plates only, as does the John Carter Brown library catalogue. The Bibliothèque nationale copy, sent from Constantinople by the press's patron, Sad Aga, contains 4 plates, as does the present copy, including the Ptolemaic astronomical chart. - The "Tarikh al-Hindi al-Gharbi" is only the fourth book printed in the Arabic alphabet in the Ottoman Empire, the product of Ibraham Müteferrika, a Hungarian convert to Islam who believed he could help arrest the decline of the Empire through his printing press. He established his press in 1729 in the palace of the Grand Vizier Ibrahim Pasha beneath the Sublime Porte and was granted a license to print all but religious works (which remained the province of scribes). - First two leaves remargined. Old annotations in Arabic script to front flyleaves; contemporary Turkish stamps to recto of final leaf of preliminaries and verso of last leaf as well as to title (here, additional notes in red and blue pencil). Some waterstaining and worming throughout, mainly confined to margins and gutter; a few plates show traces of professionally restored tears. (more)
  ¶ John Carter Brown 463. Toderini III, 41. Karatay 250. Sabin 94396. William J. Watson, "Ibrahim Müteferrika and Turkish Incunabula," in: Journal of the American Oriental Society 88, no. 3 (1968), pp. 435-441, no. 4. OCLC 416474553. Cf. T. D. Goodrich, The Ottoman Turks and the New World (Wiesbaden 1990).
 

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With an account of a voyage through the Arabian Gulf
328 Tavernier, Jean-Baptiste. Vierzig-Jährige Reise-Beschreibung. Worinnen dessen durch Türkey, Persien, Indien, und noch mehr andere Oerter, höchst-löblichst-vollbrachte sechsmalige Länder-Reise verzeichnet und in dreyen Theilen vorgestellet. Aus dem Französischen in das Teutsche übergetragen durch J. Menudier. Nuremberg, Knorz für Johann Hofmann, 1681. Folio (225 x 340 mm). 5 pts. in 1 vol. (24), 296, (4) pp. (8), 232, (4) pp. (8), 200, (4) pp. (8), 122 pp. (2), 120, (4) pp. With 2 engr. title pages, 2 engr. maps (1 double-page), 63 engravings on 30 plates (1 folding) and numerous engravings in the text. Contemp. calf with giltstamped (oxydized) cover monogram "B.P.B.F.", dated "1681".
  € 8,500
Independently published in Geneva and Nuremberg, this is one of the four slightly different Nuremberg issues of the same year. The first three parts treat Tavernier's travels to Turkey, Persia, India, and Japan (with large map of Japan), containing reports about the Japanese persecution of the Christians and the Dutch settlements in the Far East. Book Two, chapter Nine of the Persian Travels is of particular interest, as it contains an account of Tavernier's voyage through the Arabian Gulf, mentioning Bahrain, Bandar Abbas, Qeshm, and Hormuz and making observations on the people and navigation of the Gulf. Parts 4 and 5 of the present Nuremberg edition contain as a supplement the first German edition of Spon's and Wheeler's archaeological description of their journey to the Levant. The plates depict festivals, processions, costumes, views, and images of the Eastern flora and fauna as well as coins and gems. - Binding slightly chafed in places; lower corners bumped. Interior somewhat browned and brownstained; bookplate of Thomas Christian Wöhler to front pastedown. Seldom found complete; the copies last auctioned all lacked plates or the last 2 parts. Also the copy described by Laures is incomplete, containing a mere 23 plates. Not in the Atabey collection. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 12:635124A. Lipperheide 1456 = La 6. Alt-Japan-Kat. 1472. Mendelssohn IV, 462. Laures 530. Graesse VI/2, 43. Cf. Blackmer 1631 (note); Weber II, 279 (the Geneva edition only).
 

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329 Teonge, Henry. The Diary of Henry Teonge, chaplain on board His Majesty's ships Assistance, Bristol, and Royal Oak, anno 1675 to 1679. London, Charles Knight, 1825. 8vo. XVIII, (2), 327, (1) pp. With engr. t. p. and lithogr. folding facsimile. Modern half calf (by Bayntun's, Bath) with giltstamped red spine label and marbled boards. Edges sprinkled in red.
  € 500
First edition. - The fame of the English clergyman Teonge (1621-90) rests on his present work. Due to financial difficulties, he enlisted in the Navy and became a chaplain on the ships Assistance, Bristol and Royal Oak, completing three voyages to the Mediterranean, where he searched for pirates, landed in Syria and visited Malta, Zante, Cephalonia, and Aleppo. - "The interest of Teonge's life is concentrated in the diary of the few years he spent at sea, which gives an amusing and precious picture of life in the navy at that time. This journal, from 20 May 1675 to 28 June 1679, having lain in manuscript for over a century, was purchased from a Warwickshire family by Charles Knight, who edited it in 1825 as ‘The Diary of Henry Teonge,’ with a facsimile of the first folio of the manuscript (London, 8vo). The narrative reveals the diarist as a pleasant, lively, easy-going man, not so strict as to prevent his falling in with the humours of his surroundings" (DNB). The diary contains accounts of cruises in the Channel, Atlantic, and Mediterranean, leavened with occasional songs, sonnets, acrostics, etc. "The nature of Teonge's diary, and the disappearance of the manuscript for almost a century after its first publication in 1825, led to persistent suggestions that it might have been a forgery. Confirmation both of Teonge's existence and of the sequence of events which he recorded came from the Admiralty records in the Public Record Office, and the re-emergence of the manuscript itself at a Sotheby’s sale in 1918 put the matter conclusively to rest" (ODNB). - Occasional insignificant brownstaining; altogether a well-preserved copy. (more)
  ¶ Allibone 2375. DNB 56, 76. Lowndes 2605. Weber II, 412. OCLC 2438435.
 

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330 [Arabian Peninsula]. - Thesiger, Wilfred. Desert Borderlands of Oman. In: The Geographical Journal. Vol. CXVI Nos. 4-6 (December 1950). London, The Royal Geographical Society, 1950. 8vo. pp. 137-171 (entire volume: x, 137-262, (6) pp., with 28 photographic illustrations, numerous sketch maps in the text, and two folding maps, one in colour, loosely inserted). Original printed blue wrappers.
  € 800
The famous British explorer's extensive account of his expedition in the interior of Oman; much of the territory crossed now is part of the United Arab Emirates. Thesiger (1910-2003) set out from Abu Dhabi in 1948; the large and detailed colour map shows his journeys from 1945 to 1950. Thesiger later expanded on the subject to produce his classic travelogue, "Arabian Sands" (1959). Thesiger's highly regarded photographs depict the desert of the Empty Quarter, a settlement at Liwa, sand vegetation after heavy rain, a falconer mounted on a camel, a peregrine falcon with a caught hare, peregrine falcons on the blocks, Sheikh Wahiba of Yahahif and a young Wahiba girl, a thoroughbred Batina camel, the Farai well in Wahib country, portraits of Musallim bin al-Kamam and Salim bin Kabina, and a view of Jabal Kaur from the wadi Saifam. The paper was read in the presence of the Second Secretary at the Saudi Arabian Embassy, H.E. Abdul Rahman Halassie. (more)
  ¶ Not in Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula.
 

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Mid-19th century intelligence on the Trucial States: the original edition, formerly in the library of the British Agency at Muscat
331 Thomas, R. Hughes. Historical and other information, connected with the province of Oman, Muskat, Bahrein, and other places in the Persian Gulf. Bombay, Bombay Education Society's Press, 1856. Large 8vo. 1 blank leaf, (14), 687 pages, including 4 folding maps (the first partly hand-coloured) and 1 printed table. Contemp. half calf.
  € 25,000
First edition, of the utmost rarity. - A trove of historical and topographical information on the Arabian Gulf region as it appeared in the mid-19th century, under the British protectorate. Focusing on the area of the modern-day United Arab Emirates (then the "Trucial States"), Qatar, Bahrein, and Oman, the volume contains a wealth of details on the slave trade (including verbatim editions of treaties), pearl fishing in "Al Bidder" (now Doha), the local tribes, sailing directions for the coasts of the Sheikdoms, etc. The vast subtitle announced "Reports on the island of Kenn, on Bassadore, the harbour of Grane, and the island of Pheleechi. The rise and progress of, and past policy of the British Government towards, the Arab tribes of the Persian Gulf: their resources, localities, &c. Chronological table of events, from 1716 to 1843, connected with the Government of Muskat, and the Arab tribes of the Persian Gulf. Rise and progress of the Government of Muskat, and miscellaneous information connected with that Government, from 1694 to 1853. Treaties, engagements, &c. with the Imaum of Muskat, &c. Notes of a visit to Zanzibar in the year 1834. Information connected with the possessions, revenues, families, &c. of the Imaum of Muskat, the ruler of Bahrein, and the chiefs of the maritime Arab states in the Persian Gulf. Historical sketchs of the Joasemee, Uttoobee, Wahabee, Beniyas, Boo Felasa, Ejman, and Amulgavine tribes of Arabs, from the year 1716 to the year 1853. Memoir descriptive of the navigation of the Gulf of Persia: accompanied by brief notices of the manners, customs, religion, commerce, and resources of the people inhabiting its shores. Measures adopted by the British Government for the suppression of the slave trade in the Persian Gulf." The maps show a" Sketch of Rasool Khymah", a "Sketch of the Island of Kenn", a "Plan of Bassadore Roads", and a "Trigonometrical Plan of the Harbour of Grane at Koweit". The table on p. 326 gives a "Statement of the Number of Inhabitants Vessels and Date Trees of the Joasmee Ports in 1826, contrasted with the same in 1831". - Selections from the Records of the Bombay Government (New Series), no. 24. Contemporary ms. ownership on front flyleaf: "For the use of the British Agency at Muscat". Includes 2 typed letters signed (Oct.-Nov. 1971): correspondence between D. F. Hawley, of the British Embassy in Muscat, with the Library and Records Dept. of the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, relating to Hawley's (ultimately successful) endeavour to purchase this exceedingly rare volume which he had removed from the India Office Library. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 34036809.
 

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332 Timberlake, Henry. A true and strange discourse of the trauailes of two English pilgrimes: what admirable accidents befell them in their iourney towards Ierusalem, Gaza, Grand Cayro, Alexandria, and other places. Also, what rare antiquities, monuments, and notable memories (according with the ancient remembrances in the holy Scriptures) they saw in Terra Sancta: with a perfect description of the old, and new Ierusalem, and situation of the countries about them. London, Nicholas Okes for Thomas Archer, 1620. 8vo. (2), 33, (1) pp. Modern blindstamped full calf in contemporary style with giltstamped spine label.
  € 2,500
Sixth edition of this rare account of a journey to the Middle East, first published in 1603. Timberlake was a member of the Company of Merchant Adventurers of London and stockholder of the East India Company. Over a period of several years, with his ship "Troyane", he ferried both Christian and Muslim pilgrims to Alexandria, where he traded English wool for spices. The journey described here "took him to Cairo, where his narrative starts, then, with his companion John Burrell, by caravan to Gaza and Jerusalem [...] The [...] pilgrimage took fifty-two days, and he stayed in Jerusalem, where he was temporarily imprisoned, for six" (Howgego). - Leaves closely trimmed on all sides and mounted within cut-out modern sheets of paper, the remaining borders of which provide the margins. Written space ruled in ink on all sides. All editions are rare; no copies of any are listed in the auction records of the past decades. (more)
  ¶ STC (2nd ed.) 24085. Howgego I, 1029. Röhricht 1601. pkpk
 

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333 Tomkins, T[ivy] L[awrence] C[uthbert]. The Persian Gulf. (Stamp Collecting Handbooks, new series, no. 1). London, C. F. Hodgson, (1950). 8vo. 100 pp. With a double-page map and numerous text illustrations. Original marbled printed wrappers.
  € 450
"First published: May, 1950". Stamp and postal history of the Arabian Gulf states, including Bahrain, Bandar Abbas, Dubai, Muscat, etc. The first study of its kind; a shorter version had appeared in serialized form in 1949. Includes brief historical introductions to explain to the collector "What were we doing there anyway? How did we come to be there at all?" (preface). - A good copy, with contemporary ownership "Stewart G. Miller" to title page. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 13224212.
 

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Polemical treatise against the Ottomans, printed in 1481
334 [Turci]. Tractatus quidam de Turcis. Nuremberg, Conrad Zeninger, [after 3 May] 1481. 4to. 22 ff. (a7, b8, c7: wants first and last blanks). 32 lines, Gothic type. Rubricated throughout, 3 four-line lombardic initials, red penwork decoration at beginning of text. Later cream-coloured calf in contemporary style, with blind rules and stamped cover title "Tractatus De Turcis".
  € 15,000
Third edition of this polemical treatise against the Ottomans. Mainly contains prophecies referring to the Turks (by Merlin, Cyrillus, Joachim of Fiore, St. Hildegarde, Catherine of Siena, Methodius, etc.). Also one of the earliest texts to mention Hungary, and one of the very few works printed by Zeninger: "Conrad Zeninger (from Mainz) produced a mere 10-odd books between 1480 and 1482" (cf. Halle 70). The prophecy referring to the King of Hungary (fol. a[5]r) is reprinted by Fraknói Vilmos, "Schlauch Lörincz szatmári püspöknek Török János által gyüjtött könyvtára", in: Magyar Könyvszemle 2 (1877), p. 77-90, at: 77f. (cf. Apponyi). The date is based on the mention of the death of Mehmet II on fol. A[4]v. - Some browning, with slight waterstain throughout in lower margin; first and final leaf washed. Slight paper flaw in fol. 1 (not touching text); final leaf restored. Faint traces of a later ms. page count are visible near the lower edge. Occasional 16th-century marginalia. A fine copy of this rare work, rubricated throughout. (more)
  ¶ HC 15681. Goff T-503. GW M48133. BMC II, 460. BSB-Ink T-437. Oates 1077. Proctor 2229. Walsh I, 794. Pellechet 11154. Halle 70 (Newe Zeitungen), 11. Apponyi 10. Hohenemser 2169. Geldner I, 173.
 

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335 [Turkish Wars in Hungary]. Hungarisch-Türkische Chronik. Das ist: Curieuse un[d] dabey kurzgefaßte Beschreibung alles desjenigen, was sich vom ersten grausamen Kriegs-Zug der Türken, wider das Königreich Hungarn, und derselben Könige, bis auf gegenwärtige Zeit, Merk- und Denkwürdiges zugetragen. Frankfurt, Leipzig & Nuremberg, Loschge & Froberg[er], 1684. 12mo. (2), 956 pp. With double-page-sized folding frontispiece, 15 (3 folding) engr. plates, and folding engr. map. Contemp vellum.
  € 4,500
This lavishly illustrated chronicle of the Turkish wars shows numerous views of cities and battles, including Constantinople and the 1683 siege of Vienna, as well as various scenes of torture and several portraits of military leaders. A second edition was published in 1685, with larger maps and plates. A second and third volume were produced in 1686-88. - Evenly browned throughout, as common: insignificant worming near end. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 75:699267S. Sturminger 972. Kelenyi 216. Cf. Apponyi 2705. Gugitz 569a. Not in STC or Horvath.
 

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336 (Ulloa, Alfonso de). La Historia dell'impresa di Tripoli di Barberia, fatta per ordine del Sereniss. Re Catolico, l'anno M.D.LX. Con le cose avenute a Christiani nell'Isola delle Zerbe. Nuovamente mandata in luce. Venice ("Venevia"), Francesco Rampazetto, 1566. 4to. (7) ff., 1 blank f., 88, (4) ff. With woodcut printer's device to title page. 19th century vellum with giltstamped red spine labels.
  € 7,500
First dated publication of Ulloa's account of the siege of Tripolis in Italian. Includes the three-page dedication to Johann Jakob Fugger - the only place in the book where Ulloa's name appears. The author, a courtier of King Philip II, celebrates the defence of St Angelo's fortress on Malta, modern Libya. - In the 1551 Siege of Tripoli, the Ottoman fleet vanquished the Knights of Malta in Tripoli; the city was captured on 15 August by Sinan Pasha after six days of bombardment. The knights, many of them French, were returned to Malta upon the intervention of the French ambassador, and shipped onboard his galleys, while the mercenaries were enslaved. Murad Agha, the Ottoman commander of Tajura since 1536, was named as the Pashalik of the city. The siege was the first step in the all-out Italian War of 1551-59 in the European theatre. In 1553, Dragut was nominated commander of Tripoli by Suleiman, making the city a centre for piratical raids in the Mediterranean and the capital of the Ottoman province of Tripolitania. In a famous attack from Tripoli, in 1558, Dragut attacked Reggio and took all its inhabitants as slaves to Tripoli. In 1560, a powerful naval force was sent to recapture Tripoli, but that force was defeated in the Battle of Djerba, an event also described in Ulloa's book. The end of the volume is brought up by an interesting four-page account of Malta ("Descrittione dell'Isola di Malta") and a list of the names of Christian knights who died in the siege. - Occasional slight browning and brownstaining (more pronounced on title page); a few pages near end show insignificant edge flaws. Early 19th century ms. bibliographical note on flyleaf. A good copy. (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 37528. BM-STC Italian 704. Gay 1494. Palau 343.401. Göllner 1134. Graesse VI, 224. Olschki L II, 222. Cf. Mortimer 509 (with note on this edition). Not in Adams, Blackmer or Aboussouan. This edition not in Atabey.
 

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337 [Urquhart, David]. Turkey and its resources: its municipal organization and free trade; the state and prospects of English commerce in the East, the new administration of Greece, its revenue and national possessions. London, Saunders and Otley, 1833. 8vo. First edition. XV, (1), 328 pp. With lithographic map bound as frontispiece.
  € 5,000
First edition; flyleaf with authorial presentation inscription to "Mr [...] Regnaudiu". Important overview of Turkish trade, resources, infrastructure and municipal organisation by the diplomat David Urquhart (1805-77). After two and a half years fighting in the Greek war of independence, Urquhart was invited to accompany Sir Stratford Canning to Constantinople in November 1831 as an advisor during negotiations to settle the Greek boundary. In 1832 Urquhart was sent to Albania to cultivate the support of Rechid Pasha, leading advisor to the Turkish sultan. Urquhart became a great supporter of Turkey, spending most of 1834 in the country, and encouraged the British government to ally itself with Turkey against Egypt. This substantial book was written to inform the British political class of the possible commercial benefits of an Anglo-Turkish alliance. - Some negligible toning to first few leaves. Very good, uncut in original grey paper-covered boards, spine with original printed label, light wear to extremities. Scarce, particularly in original condition as here. (more)
  ¶ Goldsmiths’ 27883. OCLC 65261681.
 

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338 Valle, Pietro della. Viaggi di Pietro della Valle il pellegrino. Rome, (Vitale Mascardi for) Biagio Deversin, 1658-1663. 4to. 4 vols. (28), 436, (18) pp. (6), 492, (24) pp. (2), 546, (24) pp., l. bl. f. (4), 508, (18) pp., l. bl. f. With full-page engr. portrait in vol. 1. Uniform vellum with giltstamped spine title. All edges sprinkled in red.
  € 24,000
First edition (vol. I: second edition). The first complete and reliable edition of della Valle's "Viaggi", highly sought after as one of the earliest printed sources for the early history of Dibba, the coastal region at the northeastern tip of the United Arab Emirates, today ruled by the Emirates of Fujairah and of Sharjah. - Pietro della Valle (1586-1652) left Venice in 1614 on a pilgrimage to Palestine, proceeding to Baghdad and then into Persia, where he married and sojourned in the court of Shah Abbas. While staying with the Sultan of Bandar Abbas, he "met the son of the ruler of Dibba who was visiting. From this he learned that Dibba had formerly been subject to the kingdom of Hormuz, but was at that time loyal to the Safavids who in 1623 sent troops to Dibba, Khor Fakkan and other ports on the southeast coast of Arabia in order to prepare for a Portuguese counter-attack following their expulsion from Hormuz (Jarun). In fact, the Portuguese under Ruy Freire were so successful that the people of Dibba turned on their Safavid overlords, putting them all to death, whereupon a Portuguese garrison of 50 men was installed at Dibba. More Portuguese forces, however, had to be sent to Dibba in 1627 as a result of an Arab revolt. Curiously, two years later the Portuguese proposed moving part of the Mandaean population of southern Iraq, under pressure from neighbouring Arab tribes, to Dibba" (UAE History: 2000 to 200 years ago - http://www.uaeinteract.com/history/e_walk/con_3/con3_48.asp). Pietro della Valle's travels continued east to the coast of India, Goa and Muscat, and then back to Aleppo by way of Basra. He reached Rome in 1626, where the original Italian text of his letters written to the Neapolitan physician Mario Schipano was published. Only the first volume, dealing with Turkey, saw print during his lifetime. The two-part volume II on Persia was released in 1658, four years after his death; in 1662 the Turkey volume saw a second edition, and the set was concluded in 1663 with the volume discussing India. A single-volume English translation of the Indian travels appeared in 1665. - Attractive full vellum bindings with old shelfmark labels on spine. Insignificant browning throughout, otherwise a perfect copy, including the frequently missing portrait. From the collection of the diplomat Luigi Gabbrielli (b. 1885), Italian ambassador to Baghdad during WWII, with his autograph bookplate to front flyleaves. (more)
  ¶ Röhricht 947. Cf. Macro 1633. Wilson 234. pkpk
 

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339 Valle, Pietro della. The travels of Sig. Pietro della Valle, a Noble Roman, into East-India and Arabia Deserta. London, J. Macock for Henry Herringman, 1665. Folio. (8), 480 pp. With several woodcut plans in the text (wants the engraved map and plates). Contemp. calf, rebacked over 5 raised bands.
  € 4,500
First English edition of Pietro della Valle's travel report, highly sought after as one of the earliest printed sources for the early history of Dibba, the coastal region at the northeastern tip of the United Arab Emirates, today ruled by the Emirates of Fujairah and of Sharjah. Pietro della Valle (1586-1652) left Venice in 1614 on a pilgrimage to Palestine, proceeding to Baghdad and then into Persia, where he married and sojourned at the court of Shah Abbas. While staying with the Sultan of Bandar Abbas, he "met the son of the ruler of Dibba who was visiting. From this he learned that Dibba had formerly been subject to the kingdom of Hormuz, but was at that time loyal to the Safavids who in 1623 sent troops to Dibba, Khor Fakkan and other ports on the southeast coast of Arabia in order to prepare for a Portuguese counter-attack following their expulsion from Hormuz (Jarun). In fact, the Portuguese under Ruy Freire were so successful that the people of Dibba turned on their Safavid overlords, putting them all to death, whereupon a Portuguese garrison of 50 men was installed at Dibba. More Portuguese forces, however, had to be sent to Dibba in 1627 as a result of an Arab revolt. Curiously, two years later the Portuguese proposed moving part of the Mandaean population of southern Iraq, under pressure from neighbouring Arab tribes, to Dibba" (UAE History: 2000 to 200 years ago - http://www.uaeinteract.com/history/e_walk/con_3/con3_48.asp). Pietro della Valle's travels continued east to the coast of India, Goa and Muscat, and thence back to Aleppo by way of Basra. He reached Rome in 1626, where the original Italian text consisting of 54 letters written to the Neapolitan physician Mario Schipano was published in four parts from 1650 to 1663. Of the present first English edition, prepared by George Havers and Thomas Roe (who added his "Voyage to East India"), there are three different imprints in 1665: for J. Martin and J. Allestry, for John Place, and, as in the present copy, for Henry Herringman. - First pages slightly wormed, some waterstaining near end. Occasional edge defects and fingerstaining, otherwise a good copy. From the library of Edward Davenport with his armorial bookplate on pastedown. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2233. Wilson 234. Wing V48A. Kress 1167. Röhricht 238. Cf. Goldsmith 1153. Cf. Peter B. Rowland, Essays on Hormuz (London, 2006). This edition not in Atabey, Blackmer or Weber.
 

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The first recorded visit of a Westerner to Mecca: the first illustrated edition
340 Varthema, Lodovico di. Die Ritterlich und lobwürdig reiß [...] Sagend von den landen, Egypto, Syria, von beiden Arabia Persia, India und Ethiopia, von den gestalten, sitten, und dero menschen leben und glauben. Strasbourg, Johann Knobloch, 1516. 4to. 226 pp. (A8, B-C4, D8, E-F4, G8, H-J4, K8, L-M4, N8, O-P4, Q8, R-S4, T6, V4, X7, without the final blank). With title woodcut and 47 woodcuts in the text (including 1 full-page illustration). - (Bound after) II: Giovio, Paolo. Libellus de legatione Basilii Magni principis Moschoviae ad Clementem VII. Pontificem Max. in qua situs regionis antiquis incognitus, religio gentis, mores, & causae legationis fidelissime referuntur. Basel, [J. Froben], 1527. 39, (1) pp. With woodcut printer's device to t. p. - (Bound after) III: Fabri (of Leutkirch), Johann. Ad serenissimum principem Ferdinandum Archiducem Austriae, Moscovitarum iuxta mare glaciale religio. Basel, J. Bebel, 1526. 18 ff. - (Bound after) IV: Ricoldo (da Monte di Croce). Contra sectam Mahumeticam libellus. (Georgius de Hungaria). De vita & moribus Turcorum. Carben, Victor de. Libellus de vita et moribus Iudaeorum (ed. J. Lefèvre). Paris, H. Estienne, 1511. 86 ff. With large woodcut in the text and several woodcut initials. - (Bound after) V: Ficinus, Marsilio. De religione Christiana & fidei pietate opusculum. Xenocrates de morte, eodem interprete. Strasbourg, J. Knobloch, 1507. 90 ff. With woodcut printer's device on final page. - (Bound after) VI: Haythonus (Hatto). Liber historiarum partium orientis, sive passagium terrae sanctae scriptus anno Redemptoris nostri M.CCC. Hagenau, J. Setzer, 1529. 71 ff. With woodcut title border and device on final page. Contemp. wooden boards with wide blindstamped pigskin spine and 2 brass clasps.
  € 450,000
The first illustrated edition (in its second issue) of one of the most famous early travel reports and the first western encounter with the Arab world. Of the utmost rarity; not a single copy could be traced on the market for the past sixty years; not a single copy in the USA (cf. OCLC). Lodovico de Varthema’s “Itinerario” describes the first recorded eyewitness account by a westerner of the holy cities of Mecca and Medina. All early editions of Varthema’s “Itinerario” are exceedingly rare (even the 2013 Hajj exhibition at the MIA, Doha, only featured the 1654 reprint; cf. below). This - the first illustrated one - is certainly the rarest of them all: international auction records list not a single copy. The 1510 editio princeps was offered for US$ 1 million at the New York Antiquarian Book Fair in April 2011. - Varthema, a gentleman adventurer and soldier from Bologna, left Venice at the end of 1502. In 1503 he reached Alexandria and ascended the Nile to Cairo, continuing to Beirut, Tripoli, Aleppo and Damascus, where, adopting Islam and taking the name of Yunas, he joined a Mameluke escort of a Hajj caravan and began the pilgrimage to Mecca. Varthema was amazed by what he observed: "Truly I never saw so many people collected in one spot as during the twenty days I remained there", he begins, and arriving at the Great Mosque, continues, "it would not be possible to describe the sweetness and the fragrances which are smelt within this temple." Thanks to his knowledge of Arabic and Islam, Varthema was able to appreciate the local culture of the places he visited. Impressed and fascinated, he describes not only rites and rituals, but also social, geographical, and day-to-day details. "I determined, personally, and with my own eyes", he declares in the prefatory dedication, "to ascertain the situation of places, the qualities of peoples [...] of Egypt, Syria, Arabia Deserta and Felix, Persia, India, and Ethiopia, remembering well that the testimony of one eye-witness is worth more than ten hear-says." His good fortune did not continue unabated, however: after embarking at Jeddah and sailing to Aden, he was denounced as a Christian spy and imprisoned. He secured his release and proceeded on an extensive tour of southwest Arabia. Stopping in Sanaa and Zebid as well as a number of smaller cities, he describes the people, the markets and trade, the kind of fruits and animals that are plentiful in the vicinity, and any historical or cultural information deemed noteworthy. Returning to Aden, and after a brief stop in Ethiopia, he set sail for India. In addition to visiting Persia, Varthema explored the coasts of Malabar and Coromandel, including a very documented stay at Calicut at the beginning of 1505. He also purports to have made extensive travels around the Malay peninsula and the Moluccas. Returning to Calicut in August 1505, he took employment with the Portuguese at Cochin and, in 1508, made his way back to Europe via the Cape of Good Hope. - First published in 1510, Varthema's account became an immediate bestseller. In addition to his fascinating account of Egypt, Syria, the Arabian Peninsula, and the holy Muslim cities, "Varthema brought into European literature an appreciation of the areas east of India [...] which it had previously not received from the sea-travelers and which confirmed by firsthand observations many of the statements made earlier by Marco Polo and the writers of antiquity" (Lach, I. i. 166). "Varthema was a real traveller. His reports on the social and political conditions of the various lands he visited are reliable as being gathered from personal contact with places and peoples. His account of the overland trade is of great value in that we are made to see it before it had begun to give way to the all-seas route. He even heard of a southern continent and of a region of intense cold and very short days, being the first European probably after Marco Polo to bring back the rumor of Terra Australis" (Cox I, 260). - Bound with this work are five other 16th century imprints: II: Giovio's report on Russia is based on conversations with the Russian envoy Dimitry at the court of Pope Clement VII in Rome. - III: "The second printed book on Russia" (NUC), intelligence on Russia gathered by the later bishop of Vienna in Tübingen in 1525 from the envoy of the Grand Prince Ivan Vasilievitch. - IV: "Very rare anti-Muslim and anti-Semitic volume, of which this is the first edition to include the third tract by Victor de Carben" (Schreiber). Contains the report by Georgius de Hungaria, who was captured in 1438 during the siege of Mühlbach and was sold into Turkish slavery. Also includes the anti-Muslim treatise of Ricoldo (1242-1320) and the anti-Semitic pamphlet of Victor de Carben (1422-1515), a converted Rabbi from Cologne. - V: Fine Strasbourg humanist edition of two works by the great Neo-Platonist Marsilio Ficino (1433-99), including his 1474 apology of Christianity against Islam and Judaism. - VI: First Latin edition, edited by Menrad Molther, with his dedication to Georg von Morsum. The Armenian prince Haytho reached Poitiers in 1306 and there dictated his history of the Middle East since the first appearance of the Mongols. - Spine slightly rubbed; some browning, annotations and occasional worming. Ms. index of all works contained on front pastedown. Removed from the Donaueschingen court library with their stamps on first and final page. (more)
  ¶ I: BM-STC 66. IA 113.543 (includes copies in BSB Munich and Wolfenbüttel). Benzing (Strasbourg) 100. Schmidt (Knobloch) 132. Ritter (IV) 932 und 2000. Muller 132, 170. Kristeller 383. Paulitschke 296. Ibrahim-Hilmy II, 305. Röhricht 574. Cf. exhibition cat. “Hajj - The Journey Through Art” (Doha, 2013), p. 90 (1655 Dutch ed. only). Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2239 (other editions only). Not in VD 16 (omitted). - II: BM-STC 360. VD 16, G 2081. Adelung I, 188 ("1537" in error). - III: BM-STC 294. VD 16, F 189. Adelung I, 185. - IV: BM-STC 317. Moreau 197. Renouard 9, 1. Göllner 48. Apponyi 78. Schreiber 11. - V: BM-STC 302. Adams F 416. VD 16, F 939. Ritter 838. The same, Catalogue, 978. Schmidt (Knobloch) 33. Muller 117, 29. - VI: BM-STC 403. VD 16, H 870. Adelung I, 119 (imprecise). Röhricht 176 (p. 66). Ritter 1090. The same, Catalogue, 1171. Burg 200. Benzing (Hagenau) 84, 107.
 

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The first recorded visit of a Westerner to Mecca: the second original edition, second issue
341 Varthema, Lodovico di. Itinerario de Ludovico de Verthema Bolognese ne lo Egypto ne la Suria ne la Arabia Deserta & Felice ne la Persia ne la India, & ne la Ethiopia. La fede el vivere & costumi de tutte le prefate provincie. Milan, Giovanni Angelo Scinzenzeler, (30 April 1523). Octavo (185 x 130 mm). XLII ff. (A-E8, F2). Large woodcut on title with decorative woodcut border, putti above and below (Sander 7494 and pl. 93). Roman letter, numerous floriated white on black woodcut initials. Modern calf bound to style: covers with concentric frames in blind fillets, gilt fleurons at outer corners, central lozenge in gilt. Spine with five raised bands, lettered in gilt. Marbled endpapers. All edges gilt.
  € 125,000
Second original Italian edition, second issue of Ludovico di Varthema's famous travels to Arabia, Persia, and India: the highly important and adventurous narrative containing the first recorded visit of a Westerner to Mecca. His description of the Hijaz is especially valuable as it pre-dates the Ottoman occupation of 1520. All early editions of Varthema’s "Itinerario" are exceedingly rare (even the 2013 Hajj exhibition at the MIA, Doha, only featured the 1654 reprint; cf. below). - Varthema, a gentleman adventurer and soldier from Bologna, left Venice at the end of 1502. In 1503 he reached Alexandria and ascended the Nile to Cairo, continuing to Beirut, Tripoli, Aleppo and Damascus, where, adopting Islam and taking the name of Yunas, he joined a Mameluke escort of a Hajj caravan and began the pilgrimage to Mecca. Varthema was amazed by what he observed: "Truly I never saw so many people collected in one spot as during the twenty days I remained there", he begins, and arriving at the Great Mosque, continues, "it would not be possible to describe the sweetness and the fragrances which are smelt within this temple." Thanks to his knowledge of Arabic and Islam, Varthema was able to appreciate the local culture of the places he visited. Impressed and fascinated, he describes not only rites and rituals, but also social, geographical, and day-to-day details. "I determined, personally, and with my own eyes", he declares in the prefatory dedication, "to ascertain the situation of places, the qualities of peoples [...] of Egypt, Syria, Arabia Deserta and Felix, Persia, India, and Ethiopia, remembering well that the testimony of one eye-witness is worth more than ten hear-says." His good fortune did not continue unabated, however: after embarking at Jeddah and sailing to Aden, he was denounced as a Christian spy and imprisoned. He secured his release and proceeded on an extensive tour of southwest Arabia. Stopping in Sanaa and Zebid as well as a number of smaller cities, he describes the people, the markets and trade, the kind of fruits and animals that are plentiful in the vicinity, and any historical or cultural information deemed noteworthy. Returning to Aden, and after a brief stop in Ethiopia, he set sail for India. In addition to visiting Persia, Varthema explored the coasts of Malabar and Coromandel, including a stay at Calicut at the beginning of 1505. He also purports to have made extensive travels around the Malay peninsula and the Moluccas. Returning to Calicut in August 1505, he took employment with the Portuguese at Cochin and, in 1508, made his way back to Europe via the Cape of Good Hope. - First published in 1510, Varthema's account became an immediate bestseller. In addition to his fascinating account of Egypt, Syria, the Arabian Peninsula, and the holy Muslim cities, "Varthema brought into European literature an appreciation of the areas east of India [...] which it had previously not received from the sea-travelers and which confirmed by firsthand observations many of the statements made earlier by Marco Polo and the writers of antiquity" (Lach, I. i. 166). "Varthema was a real traveller. His reports on the social and political conditions of the various lands he visited are reliable as being gathered from personal contact with places and peoples. His account of the overland trade is of great value in that we are made to see it before it had begun to give way to the all-seas route. He even heard of a southern continent and of a region of intense cold and very short days, being the first European probably after Marco Polo to bring back the rumor of Terra Australis" (Cox I, 260). - The fine title woodcut shows Varthema seated on a bench in front of a building, writing on a globe, behind him a set of dividers; in the background a landscape with a ship at sea and a castle. 18th-century collection shelfmark to title page. A very clean, appealingly bound copy; a few minor traces of worming have been professionally repaired. Rare; only four copies in international auction records. OCLC lists five copies only (Yale, Trinity College Hartford, NYPL, BL, BnF). (more)
  ¶ BM-STC 73. Blackmer 1719. Röhricht 574. Gay 140. Cordier Indosinica I, 98. BM 2: 473 (96). Boies Penrose, pp. 28-32. OCLC 42438419. Cf. exhibition cat. “Hajj - The Journey Through Art” (Doha, 2013), p. 90 (1655 Dutch ed. only). Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2239 (other editions only). Carter, Robert A. Sea of Pearls, p. 68 (1520 edition). Not in the Atabey collection. Not in Adams.
 

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The first recorded visit of a Westerner to Mecca: the first English edition
342 (Varthema, Lodovico di. The Navigation and v[o]yages of Lewes Vertomannus, Gentelman of the citie of Rome, to the regions of Arabia, Egypte, Persia, Syria, Ethiopia, and East India, both within and without the ryver of Ganges, etc. In the yeere of our Lorde 1503. Conteynyng many notable and straunge thinges, both hystoricall and naturall. Translated out of Latine into Engylshe, by Richarde Eden). London, Richard Jugge, 1577. 4to. Title leaf, (8), 466, (6) ff. (numerous misnumberings). With historiated woodcut initials. Modern crushed red morocco by Pratt, boards paneled and gilt, spine gilt with raised bands, all edges gilt.
  € 265,000
The first English edition of Ludovico di Varthema's famous travels to Arabia, Persia, and India: the highly important and adventurous narrative containing the first recorded visit of a westerner to Mecca. All early editions of Varthema’s "Itinerario" are exceedingly rare (even the 2013 Hajj exhibition at the MIA, Doha, only featured the 1654 reprint; cf. below). - Varthema, a gentleman adventurer and soldier from Bologna, left Venice at the end of 1502. In 1503 he reached Alexandria and ascended the Nile to Cairo, continuing to Beirut, Tripoli, Aleppo and Damascus, where, adopting Islam and taking the name of Yunas, he joined a Mameluke escort of a Hajj caravan and began the pilgrimage to Mecca. Varthema was amazed by what he observed: "Truly I never saw so many people collected in one spot as during the twenty days I remained there", he begins, and arriving at the Great Mosque, continues, "it would not be possible to describe the sweetness and the fragrances which are smelt within this temple." Thanks to his knowledge of Arabic and Islam, Varthema was able to appreciate the local culture of the places he visited. Impressed and fascinated, he describes not only rites and rituals, but also social, geographical, and day-to-day details. "I determined, personally, and with my own eyes", he declares in the prefatory dedication, "to ascertain the situation of places, the qualities of peoples [...] of Egypt, Syria, Arabia Deserta and Felix, Persia, India, and Ethiopia, remembering well that the testimony of one eye-witness is worth more than ten hear-says." His good fortune did not continue unabated, however: after embarking at Jeddah and sailing to Aden, he was denounced as a Christian spy and imprisoned. He secured his release and proceeded on an extensive tour of southwest Arabia. Stopping in Sanaa and Zebid as well as a number of smaller cities, he describes the people, the markets and trade, the kind of fruits and animals that are plentiful in the vicinity, and any historical or cultural information deemed noteworthy. Returning to Aden, and after a brief stop in Ethiopia, he set sail for India. In addition to visiting Persia, Varthema explored the coasts of Malabar and Coromandel, including a stay at Calicut at the beginning of 1505. He also purports to have made extensive travels around the Malay peninsula and the Moluccas. Returning to Calicut in August 1505, he took employment with the Portuguese at Cochin and, in 1508, made his way back to Europe via the Cape of Good Hope. - First published in 1510, Varthema's account became an immediate bestseller. In addition to his fascinating account of Egypt, Syria, the Arabian Peninsula, and the holy Muslim cities, "Varthema brought into European literature an appreciation of the areas east of India [...] which it had previously not received from the sea-travelers and which confirmed by firsthand observations many of the statements made earlier by Marco Polo and the writers of antiquity" (Lach, I. i. 166). "Varthema was a real traveller. His reports on the social and political conditions of the various lands he visited are reliable as being gathered from personal contact with places and peoples. His account of the overland trade is of great value in that we are made to see it before it had begun to give way to the all-seas route. He even heard of a southern continent and of a region of intense cold and very short days, being the first European probably after Marco Polo to bring back the rumor of Terra Australis" (Cox I, 260). - Published as an extensive part of "The History of Travayle in the West and East Indies" - one of the first English versions of the significant collection edited by Pietro Martire d'Anghiera (Peter Martyr, 1457-1526). The first independently published English translation would not appear until 1863: Varthema's travelogue was included for the first time in the present translated edition of Martyr's "History". The translation, with some omissions, is that of Decades I-III of "De Orbe Novo" by Martyr, with additions from other sources, edited by Richard Eden and Richard Willes. Willes was a member of the Jesuits from 1565 to 1572 and was familiar with Maffei, the Jesuit chronicler whose account he drew on for this work. Under the benefaction of the Earl of Bedford, Willes expanded Eden's translation to include, apart from Varthema's travels, four Decades and an abridgement of Decades V-VIII; Frobisher's voyage for a Northwest Passage, Sebastian Cabot's voyages to the Arctic for the Moscovy Company, Cortez's conquest of Mexico, Pereira's description of China, 1565, Acosta and Maffei's notices of Japan, 1573, and the first two English voyages to West Africa. Also, this is the first account in English of Magellan's circumnavigation, as well as the first printed work to advocate a British colony in North America. - Lightly washed, and very clean internally. A beautiful copy. (more)
  ¶ Howgego M65. Brunet I, 294. OCLC 5296745. LCCN 02-7743. European Americana 577/2. Church 119. Streeter Sale 24. Arents 23. Borba de Moraes, p. 33. Hill 533. BM-STC 649. Sabin 1562. Cordier, Japonica 71. Field 485. Cf. exhibition cat. “Hajj - The Journey Through Art” (Doha, 2013), p. 90 (1655 Dutch ed. only). Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2239f. (other editions only). Not in the Atabey or Blackmer collections.
 

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The first recorded visit of a non-Muslim to Mecca
343 Varthema, Ludvico di. De uytnemende en seer vvonderlijcke zee-en-landt-reyse van de heer Ludovvyck di Barthema, van Bononien, Ridder &c. Gedaen inde Morgenlanden, Syrien, vrughtbaer en woest Arabien, Perssen, Indien, Egypten, Ethiopien en andere. Utrecht, Nieuwenhuysen & Snellaert, 1654. 4to. (8), 56 pp, 56 [but: 60], 24, (2) pp., last blank f. With engraved title page and 4 additional engraved plates. Bound in contemp. blindstamped vellum with ms. title to spine.
  € 25,000
Rare second Dutch translation of this highly important, adventurous narrative containing the first recorded visit of a non-Muslim to Mecca. This edition includes for the first time several full-page engravings - one depicting a 15th-century battle against camel-borne Arabs. - Ludovico di Varthema or Barthema (ca. 1468-1517) sailed from Venice to Egypt in 1502 and travelled through Alexandria, Beirut, Tripoli, and Aleppo, arriving in Damascus in April 1503. Here he enrolled in the Mameluke garrison and proceeded overland to Khaybar, Medina and Mekka, thereby becoming the first European to enter the two holiest cities of Islam. His further travels took him to Southern Arabia, Shiraz (Persia), India, Goa, Cochin, and supposedly the Malay isthmus, Sumatra, Banda, the Moluccas, the Spice Islands, Borneo, Java and Malacca. He returned to Lisbon in 1508. - "Varthema's 'Itinerario', first published in 1510, had an enormous impact at the time, and in some respects determined the course of European expansion towards the Orient" (Howgego). His account, moreover, contains a detailed description of Mecca and the Islamic pilgrimage, and four evocative plates (including an illustration of a Sati ritual). - Contrary to the statement on the title-page, this is the second Dutch translation; an earlier and rather elusive rendering had already been published at Antwerp in 1544 (recorded in just one institutional copy worldwide!). The present translation was made by Felix van Sambix de Jonge after Megiser's German translation of the Italian. With a poem by Simon de Vries. - Pages closely cropped but no loss to text or plates, a crisp copy. (more)
  ¶ Tiele, Bibl., 1128. Museum of Islamic Art, p. 90 (1655 re-issue). Cf. Macro 2239f. Howgego I, V15. Lach I, pp. 164-166. Cf. Carter, Sea of Pearls, p. 68 (1520 Italian ed.). pkpk
 

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344 Vernet, Horace / Goupil, [Frédéric Auguste Antoine]. Voyage d'Horace Vernet en Orient. Rédigé par M. Goupil Fesquet. Orné de seize dessins. Paris, Challamel, [1843]. Large 8vo. 228 pp. (misnumbered "328"). With lithogr. frontispiece and 15 lithogr. plates, all in beautiful contemporary colour, raised in gum Arabic, with tissue guards. Contemp. half calf with gilt spine.
  € 950
First edition; republished in Brussels in 1844. The artist Goupil-Fesquet (1817-78) accompanied Vernet to Egypt and Syria, where is is known to have taken the first dagerreotypes in the area - only two months after the discovery of photography was announced in 1839. This work is an account of that famous journey which became a landmark in the history of photography in the Near East. In addition to his description of the famous tour, Fesquet discusses the oriental decorative arts. - Strong foxing throughout. (more)
  ¶ Blackmer 718. Weber I, 309. Not in Ibrahim-Hilmy.
 

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A large-paper copy from the library of Cardinal Richelieu
345 Vien, Joseph-Marie. Caravanne du Sultan à la Mecque: Mascarade turque faite à Rome par Messieurs les pensionnaires de l'Académie de France et leurs amis au carnaval de l'année 1748. [Paris, c. 1749]. Folio (368 x 255 mm). Etched and engraved title and 31 etched plates (numbered 1-30 and one unnumbered). Contemp. French red morocco gilt, arms of Louis-François-Armand de Vignerot du Plessis, duc de Richelieu et de Fronsac on covers (Olivier 407, fer 15), within gilt border of Richelieu’s repeated motif of two crossed batons intertwined with an ornamental “R”, repeated with coronet within arabesques at the corners, spine gilt in compartments with same motif.
  € 35,000
First edition; a large-paper copy with Richelieu's arms. Vien's charming series of etchings depicts the costumes worn by members of the French Academy in Rome for a "Turkish masquerade" held during the Carnival celebrations of 1748. This masque is an outstanding example of the influence the orient exerted on western style during the late-Baroque era, showcasing the degree to which cultural transfer was possible and even a matter of enthusiastic adoption by the west but little more than half a century after the siege of Vienna. The elaborate masquerades at the French Academy constituted an important fixture in the Roman calendar. As director of the Academy, Vien organised the masque of 1748, the fabulous costumes of which are presented here, designed, drawn and etched by Vien himself. The costumes in the present suite are "a curious mixture of authentic Turkish habits and European invention" (Blackmer), showing the stock figures of the Turkish court liberally enhanced with elements of Vien's own concoction. The fantastical nature of the creations is a far cry from the sober neo-classical style with which Vien is commonly associated (his pupils included some of the foremost artists of the period, notably Jacques-Louis David). Vien's original drawings and oil paintings for the Mascarade are held by the Musée du Petit Palais; they were exhibited in Berlin in 1989. - Some marginal dampstaining and foxing, binding rebacked retaining most of original spine, corners repaired. This copy commanded $26,000 at Christie's New York in 1997. Provenance: from the library of Louis-François-Armand de Vignerot du Plessis, duc de Richelieu et de Fronsac (1696-1788), a close friend of Louis XV of France, though critical of Madame de Pompadour. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 1288. Lipperheide Sm 10. Colas 3005 (suggesting the plates are un-numbered). Hiler 879. Le Blanc II, 122, 8-39. Cohen/R. 1014f. Brunet V, 1211. Cf. Blackmer 1730. Cf. Gay 3644. Graesse VI/2, 311 (Paris, Bassan et Poignan).
 

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346 Vignes, Louis. Extrait des notes d'un voyage d'exploration a la mer morte, dans le Wady Arabah, sur la rive gauche du Jourdain. Publié sous les auspices de M. le duc de Luynes. Paris, Henri Plon, 1865. Folio (36 x 27 cm). 79, (1) pp. Original printed wrappers. Without the map, as common.
  € 650
First edition of Vignes's "Extrait des notes", republished the same year within the "Nouv. ann. des voyages 1864", "Bulletin de l'oeuvre 1864" etc. An account of the Duc de Luynes's 1864 scientific expedition to the Dead Sea. The map was not completed when the "Extrait" was issued: the present copy retains the cover label announcing that the two map sheets would be supplied to the purchaser when ready (Tobler 246). - Binding professionally repaired. A clean, very wide-margined copy. (more)
  ¶ Röhricht p. 517, no. 2841. Tobler 203.
 

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347 Villiers, Allan. Sons of Sindbad. London, Hodder & Stroughton Limited, 1940. 4to. XIV, 346 pp. With end-paper maps. Blue cloth with gilt embossed titles to spine.
  € 450
First edition. An account of sailing with the Arabs in their dhows, in the Red Sea, around the coasts of Arabia and to Zanzibar and Tanganyika; pearling in the Persian Gulf; and the life of the shipmasters, the mariners and merchants of Kuwait. With particular attention to Basra, Kuwait, Bahrain, and Muscat. Numerous black and white photographs by the author, world famous master mariner and adventurer Allan Villiers (1903-82). - A fine copy. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2250.
 

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348 Vincenzo Maria de S. Caterina da Siena. Il Viaggio all'Indie Orientali. Con le osservationi, e successi net medesimo, i costumi, kiti di varie natione, & reconditissimi arcani de gentili; cavati consomma diligenza da loro scritti, con la descrittione degl'animali quadrupedi, serpenti, ucelli, e piante di quel mondo nuovo, con le loro virtu singolari. Venice, Giacomo Zattoni, 1678. 4to. (24), 516, 20 pp. With woodcut printer's device on title page and several woodcut head- and tailpieces, and initials. Modern limp vellum with ties.
  € 4,000
Second edition of one of the most important Italian travellers of the 17th century to the Middle East and India. Vincenzo Maria (Murchio) was a Carmelite missionary with a keen eye and much interest to record manners, customs, and natural history. Travelling through Turkey, Lebanon, Syria, Persia, Arabia before arriving in India, he returned to his homeland via Muscat. His book is far more then an intinerary of the Carmelite mission to India: book I recounts the journey to Malabar, also mentioning the Middle East, Mecca, Arabia, religion and other subjects. Book two is about the Christians of St. Thomas; book three is on political, religious and social life of Malabar. Book IV, probably prepared with the aid of Father Matthew, describes the plants of Malabar and the return trip to Europe. With a description of Goa. "Perhaps the most important of the 17th century Italian travellers" (Atabey). - A good copy with slight staining and soiling. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 1297 (3rd edition). Streit V, 538. Cat. NHSM I, p. 240. Graesse VI, 327. Not in Blackmer or Weber.
 

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349 Wagner, Johann Christoph. Delineatio provinciarum Pannoniae et Imperii Turcici in Oriente. Eine grundrichtige Beschreibung deß ganzen Aufgangs, sonderlich aber deß Hochlöblichen Königreichs Ungarn, und der ganzen Türckey, auch deren Völcker, welche selbigem Monarchen zinßbar, als Mohren, Arabern und Tartarn, von ihren grausamen Proceduren, gegen die Christenheit [...]. Augsburg, Jakob Koppmayer, 1684. Small folio (206 x 324 mm). (8), 162, (6) [instead of 8] pp. Title page printed in red and black. With double-page-sized frontispiece, 39 (instead of 41) engr. plates, and 2 engr. maps; numerous woodcuts in the text. Contemp. blindstamped leather over wooden boards with 2 clasps.
  € 5,000
First edition of this highly interesting, appealing work, a topical publication produced but a year after the 1683 Siege of Vienna. Four additional volumes would be prepared by 1689. The plates show views of Hungary, the Ottoman Empire, and the Near and Middle East (Jerusalem, Egypt, Babylon, etc.), as well as Sultan Mehmet IV and the relief of Vienna. - Binding rubbed. Some brownstaining throughout with occasional waterstains. Several leaves rebacked or reinforced in the margins (occasional loss to text or image); wants the view of Ofen (Buda) and the "Crowning of the Empress" as well as one leaf of the index. (more)
  ¶ VD 17, 23:300271C. Lipperheide LB 22. Nebehay/W. 794. Not in Apponyi.
 

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Pearl fishing, hawks, Arabian horses, and Muhammad ibn 'Abd al-Wahhab
350 Waring, Edward Scott. A Tour to Sheeraz, by the Route of Kazroon and Feerozabad; with various remarks on the manners, customs, laws, language, and literature of the Persians. London, W. Bulmer for T. Cadell & W. Davies, 1807. Folio. XIII, (3), 329, (1) pp. With engraved frontispiece (Fat'h-Ali Shah Qajar, King of Persia) and engr. portrait plate (Shaknubat, mistress of Kurim Khan), both after Persian originals. Later blue cloth with giltstamped spine title.
  € 3,500
First European-printed edition, following an error-ridden edition published at Bombay in 1804. Includes a chapter on Arabian horses, an early account of Muhammad ibn 'Abd al-Wahhab and Wahhabi Islam, and passages on hawk-hunting and pearl fishing in the Arabian Gulf "from the 56th to the 48th degree east longitude", i. e., essentially the Gulf coast from Ras al-Khaimah to Qatar and Bahrain and on to Kuwait. Early attempt at an encompassing description of Persia, by the Bengal civil servant Edward W. H. Scott-Waring (1783-1821). "Very rare" (Allibone). - Bound without the half-title; bookplate and blindstamps of the City of Leeds Public Library. (more)
  ¶ Diba Collection p. 139. Wilson p. 240. Henze IV, 461. Cf. Weber I, 3. Brunet V, 1416. Graesse VI/2, 420 (1st ed. Bombay, 1804).
 

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351 Warnery, [Charles-Emmanuel] de. Remarques sur le militaire des Turcs et des Russes. Breslau, Wilhelm Theophil Korn, 1771. 8vo. 264 pp. With 3 folding engr. plates. Contemp. calf with giltstamped red label to gilt spine. Marbled endpapers. All edges red.
  € 1,500
Second, enlarged edition, published a year after the first and now including "diverses observations sur les grandes actions qui se sont passées dans la dernière guerre d’Hongrie, et dans la présente en Moldavie". This is the first work of the Swiss-born De Warnery (1720-86), published in a German translation as early as 1766 (purportedly against his own wishes): according to the author, never one to eschew self-aggrandizement, he was the first to "unmask the Turks" and show that they did not warrant the fear with which they were usually viewed (cf. ADB XLI, 176). The plates show suggestions for battle arrays. - Unobtrusive repairs to lower cover of the appealing binding. Variously browned and brownstained due to paper. Rare. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Barbier IV, 257. Cf. Atabey 1321 (first ed. 1770). Not in Blackmer.
 

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352 Warren, Charles. Underground Jerusalem: an account of some of the principal difficulties encountered in its exploration and the results obtained. With a narrative of an expedition through the Jordan Valley and a visit to the Samaritans. London, Richard Bentley & Son, 1876. 8vo. XX, 559, (1) pp. With 10 plates and 19 text illustrations. Publisher's original giltstamped orange cloth.
  € 1,500
First edition. - The British army officer and archaeologist Charles Warren (1840-1927) had already worked on the immense Gibraltar survey project in the early 1860s. "From 1867 to 1870 he worked for the Palestine Exploration Fund, and surveyed much of the region and excavated in Jerusalem, where he helped recover the Moabite Stone" (ODNB, s.v.). He published his findings in several works, of which "Underground Jerusalem" is the second. - Occasional foxing, but altogether a good copy. (more)
  ¶ Röhricht (Palästina) 538. OCLC 4028606.
 

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353 Weber, Otto. Forschungsreisen in Süd-Arabien bis zum Auftreten Eduard Eduard Glasers (Der Alte Orient. 8. Jahrgang, Heft 4). Leipzig, Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung, 1907. 8vo. 34 pp. With 3 maps and 4 illustrations within the text. Publisher's original printed wrappers.
  € 150
Overview of four hundred years of western research expeditions undertaken to southern Arabia, especially Yemen, beginning with Lodovico di Varthema (c. 1470-1517) and including the then-recent travels of Eduard Glaser (1855-1908), who visited Suez, Jeddah, al-Hudaydah and Sana'a, collecting thousands of inscriptions in Yemen that are today held by the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. - Slightly browned throughout, short tear to front wrapper cover, otherwise in good condition. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 50688623.
 

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354 Wellsted, [James Raymond]. Narrative of a Journey into the Interior of Omán. [London, Geographical Journal], 1837. Large 8vo. 101-114 pp. Modern wrappers with printed cover label. Without map.
  € 100
Extract from the Journal of the Royal Geographic Society, vol. 7. - Wellsted's short career was almost entirely devoted to the surveying of the Red Sea, Arabia and Oman, undertaken on a number of expeditions between 1830 and 1837. On board the surveying ship Palinurus he was the first European to set foot in the interior of Oman. Starting late in 1835 from the easternmost point of Oman, Wellsted made his way westward through the Ja`alan region to the Wahibah Sands and then struck north up the Wadi Batha to Samad. There he was joined by Lieutenant F. Whitelock, also of the Indian Navy, who had set out from Muscat later. Together they reached Nazwa, the ancient capital of Oman, and climbed the lower slopes of the Jabal al-Akhdhar in central Oman. In January 1836 they arrived on the Al-Batinah coast and then turned west, recrossing the Hajar mountains and emerging on the edge of the Dhaharah, the rocky steppe that stretches west toward the Rub` al-Khali. In 1840 he was to publish his monumental "Travels to the City of the Caliphs, along the Shores of the Persian Gulf", one of the best English 19th-c. accounts of Arabia and the Gulf. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2279.
 

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355 [Wellsted, James Raymond]. Reiseskizzen aus Arabien. Oman und die Küste des persischen Golfs (Nach Wellstedt). In: Meyer's Volksbibliothek für Länder-, Völker- und Naturkunde. 76. Band. Hildburghausen & New York, Bibliographisches Institut / Hermann J. Meyer, [1855]. 12mo. 161-197 pp.; entire work: 221, (3) pp. With 3 folding engr. plates. Original printed wrappers.
  € 400
Rare German translation of Wellsted's account of Oman. J. R. Wellsted's short career was almost entirely devoted to the surveying of the Red Sea, Arabia and Oman, undertaken on a number of expeditions between 1830 and 1837. On board the surveying ship Palinurus he was the first European to set foot in the interior of Oman. Starting late in 1835 from the easternmost point of Oman, Wellsted made his way westward through the Ja`alan region to the Wahibah Sands and then struck north up the Wadi Batha to Samad. There he was joined by Lieutenant F. Whitelock, also of the Indian Navy, who had set out from Muscat later. Together they reached Nazwa, the ancient capital of Oman, and climbed the lower slopes of the Jabal al-Akhdhar, in central Oman. In January 1836 they arrived on the Al-Batinah coast and then turned west, recrossing the Hajar mountains and emerging on the edge of the Dhaharah, the rocky steppe that stretches west toward the Rub` al-Khali. - Somewhat foxed throughout. Uncut, untrimmed copy. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 162829268.
 

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356 Wellsted, J[ames] R[aymond]. Travels to the City of the Caliphs, along the Shores of the Persian Gulf and the Mediterranean. Including a Voyage to the Coast of Arabia, and a Tour on the Island of Socotra. London, Henry Colburn, 1840. Large 8vo. 2 vols. XIII, (3), 405, (1) pp. VIII, 347, (1) pp. With 2 lithogr. frontispieces and a folding map of the Arabian Peninsula. Contemp. blindstamped cloth with gilt title to spine.
  € 6,000
Only edition. One of the best English 19th-c. accounts of Arabia and the Gulf. Wellsted's short career was almost entirely devoted to the surveying of the Red Sea, Arabia and Oman, undertaken on a number of expeditions between 1830 and 1837. On board the surveying ship Palinurus he was the first European to set foot in the interior of Oman. Starting late in 1835 from the easternmost point of Oman, Wellsted made his way westward through the Ja`alan region to the Wahibah Sands and then struck north up the Wadi Batha to Samad. There he was joined by Lieutenant F. Whitelock, also of the Indian Navy, who had set out from Muscat later. Together they reached Nazwa, the ancient capital of Oman, and climbed the lower slopes of the Jabal al-Akhdhar, in central Oman. In January 1836 they arrived on the Al-Batinah coast and then turned west, recrossing the Hajar mountains and emerging on the edge of the Dhaharah, the rocky steppe that stretches west toward the Rub` al-Khali. - Bindings rubbed; spines rebacked. Interior somewhat foxed as common. Removed from the Worcester Public Library. Rare; the Peter Hopkirk copy fetched £3,500 at Sotheby's (Oct 14, 1998, lot 1192). (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2283. Howgego III, 635. Weber I, 67. Wilson 242. Henze IV, 476. Not in Gay, Blackmer, or Ghani.
 

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357 Whigham, H[enry] J[ames]. The Persian Problem. An examination of the rival positions of Russia and Great Britain in Persia with some account of the Persian Gulf and Bagdad Railway. London, Isbister and Co., 1903. 8vo. XVI, 424 pp. Folding map frontispiece and 2 full-page maps to the text, 2 as plates, 23 plates. Original sand buckram, title gilt to spine and upper board, top edge gilt, others uncut.
  € 7,500
First and only edition. Important regional study of the Arabian Gulf, published in response to the grant of the Baghdad Railway concession by the Ottoman Government to a German-backed consortium. Assesses the economic, military and political implications of rival claims in the various states of the area. Whigham was a well-connected Scottish author who emigrated to America and worked as drama critic on the Chicago Tribune, and as a war correspondent at the Spanish-American and Russo-Japanese Wars. A close friend and correspondent of British Persian Gulf opinion-makers Lord Curzon and Sir Percy Cox, Whigham wrote the book, based on his extensive travels in the region, at the request of Lord Curzon, who had "advised [him] to go to the Gulf [and] instructed his subordinate officials in that part of the world to give me all the assistance in their power." Whigham is probably best remembered as a prominent amateur golfer, winner of the second and third US Amateur Championships, and author of "How to play Golf", the first golf instruction manual illustrated from action photographs. - Ink ownership stamp of Charles C. Sterrett, an American Presbyterian missionary to the Christian population in the region, to the front pastedown. Binding a little rubbed and spotted, endpapers foxed. Small inked library stamp and cancellation to the title page, otherwise very good. (more)
  ¶ Diba Collection 1978, 227. Wilson 243. OCLC 2987283.
 

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358 Wietz, J. K. Sitten, Gebräuche und Trachten der Bewohner des osmanischen und türkischen Reiches. Prague, Bohmann, 1828. 8vo. 181, (3) pp., final blank f. With 20 engraved plates in original hand colour. Contemporary boards.
  € 2,800
First edition, issued in ten separate instalments. An entire chapter is dedicated to the Wahhabi Bedouin Arabs, their customs and costumes. The charming engravings in vibrant original hand colour are based on Castellan's 1812 "Moeurs", each plate containing several meticulous costume illustrations. - Spine sunned. Contemporary ownership "S. M. Mayer zu Klagenfurt" on title page; additional (partly deleted) ownership on flyleaf. Very clean altogether. Rare. Formerly in the Ottoman collection of the Swiss industrialist Herry W. Schaefer. (more)
  ¶ Atabey 1333. OCLC 255511974. Not in Lipperheide, Colas, or Hiler.
 

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359 Wolf, Hieronymus (ed.). Historia rerum in oriente gestarum ab exordio mundi et orbe condito ad nostra haec usque tempora. Frankfurt/Main, Sigismund Feyerabend, 1587. Folio (240 x 362 mm). (4), 297, (44) ff. Title page printed in red and black. With woodcut vignette to t. p., printer's device to final page, and woodcut arms of Nidhard Thungen on dedication leaf. Original calf (restored).
  € 7,500
The first edition of this work to include Turkish material: an early, important collection of sources on Byzantium, Turkey, and the Islamic world, containing writings by Laonikos Chalkokondyles ("Historiarum de origine ac rebus gestis Turcorum libri X"), Nikephoros Gregoras ("Historiae Byzantinae libri XI"), Johannes Zonaras, and Niketas Choniates, as well as additional material by several other writers on Turkey. - Binding professionally repaired. Some brownstaining and waterstaining throughout; a few repaired paper flaws near beginning and end. (more)
  ¶ VD 16, H 3899. Adams H 634. BM-STC German 259. Atabey 582. Blackmer 819. Hoffmann II, 628f.
 

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360 Wollaston, Arthur N. The Sword of Islam. London, John Murray, 1905. 8vo. VIII, (4), 523, (1) pp. With folding map and 16 printed plates. Contemp. red smoothed goatskin morocco binding, elaborately giltstamped for the Royal Asiatic Society with their monogram and motto on covers and (slightly faded) spine. All edges gilt.
  € 350
First and only edition. The fine illustrations show the approach to Mecca, Damascus, Gibraltar from the East, a nook in Algiers, the Tomb of the Khalifs in Cairo, the Gate of Blood in Toledo, a mosque in Cordova, the Alhambra in Granada, a reproduced double-page from the Qur'an, the mosque at Mecca, Medina, pilgrims' dress, Meccan chiefs with camel and attendant, etc. - This copy awarded in 1912 to the later journalist, political theoretician and British Communist Rajani Palme Dutt (1896-1974) as school prize for Essays by William Henry Denham Rouse, headmaster at Perse Grammar School, Cambridge. - Dutt's father, Upendra Dutt, was an Indian surgeon; his mother Anna Palme Dutt was Swedish and related to the future Prime Minister of Sweden, Olof Palme. Dutt was educated at The Perse School, Cambridge and Balliol College, Oxford, where he obtained a first class degree in classics after having been suspended for a time due to his status as a conscientious objector in World War I. Dutt married an Estonian, Salme Murrik, in 1922. His wife had come to Great Britain in 1920 as a representative of the Communist International. That same year, he joined the newly formed Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) and remained one of its most conservative members all his life. In 1921 Dutt founded a monthly magazine called 'Labour Monthly', a publication which he edited until his death. - Spine slightly rubbed; front hinge repaired; a nicely preserved presentation copy in a fine RAS binding. (more)
 

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361 Wüstenfeld, Ferdinand. Register zu den genealogischen Tabellen der Arabischen Stämme und Familien. Mit historischen und geographischen Bemerkungen. Göttingen, Dieterich, 1853. 8vo. XIII, (3), 476 pp. 20th-century half cloth library binding.
  € 950
First edition. "An indispensable tool of the trade for any scholar of Arabic studies" (cf. Fück). The "Register" is an index to accompany Wüstenfeld's "Genealogical Tables of the Arabic Tribes and Families", published the previous year. - The German orientalist H. F. Wüstenfeld (1808-99), known as a literary historian of Arabic literature, studied theology and oriental languages at Göttingen and Berlin. He taught at Göttingen, becoming a professor there (1842-90). He published many important Arabic texts and valuable works on Arabic history. - Traces of old shelfmark label on spine; stamp of the Central Public Library "Shear Zion", Tel-Aviv, on front flyleaf. (more)
  ¶ Fück, 194. Cf. Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2344.
 

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362 Wüstenfeld, Ferdinand. Über das Leben und die Schriften des Scheich Abu Zakarija Jahja el-Nawawi. Nach handschriftlichen Quellen. Göttingen, Dieterich Buchhandlung, 1849. 8vo. (4), 78 pp. Modern calf.
  € 450
First edition. - The Syrian-born Abu Zakaria Mohiuddin Yahya Ibn Sharaf al-Nawawi (1233-77), popularly known as an-Nawawi, was a Sunni Muslim author on Fiqh and hadith; his position on legal matters is considered the authoritative one in the Shafi'i Madhhab. H. F. Wüstenfeld (1808-99), known as a literary historian of Arabic literature, studied theology and oriental languages at Göttingen and Berlin. He taught at Göttingen, becoming a professor there (1842-90). He published many important Arabic texts and valuable works on Arabic history. - From the library of the French scholar Henri Pérès (1890-1983); additional ownerships to title and flyleaf. Some foxing. (more)
  ¶ GAL I, p. 496. Zenker II, 741.
 

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The Life of the Prophet
363 Wüstenfeld, Ferdinand (ed.). Das Leben Muhammed's nach Muhammed Ibn Ishâk bearbeitet von Abd el-Malik Ibn Hischâm. Aus den Handschriften zu Berlin, Leipzig, Gotha und Leyden herausgegeben. Göttingen, Dieterich, 1859-1860. 8vo. 2 vols. 1026, (2) pp. (2), LXXII, 266 pp. Uniformly bound in marbled half calf with giltstamped black spine labels and marbled endpapers.
  € 2,500
The nineteenth century's classic edition of the Life of Muhammad, edited from early manuscripts by the German orientalist H. F. Wüstenfeld (1808-99). The great literary historian of Arabic literature studied theology and oriental languages at Göttingen and Berlin. He taught at Göttingen, becoming a professor there (1842-90), and published many important Arabic texts and valuable works on Arabic history. - Vol. 1 contains the Arabic text, vol. 2 contains the introduction, critical apparatus, and index. Attractive bindings very slightly rubbed. (more)
  ¶ The Arabic Books Printed in Europe (King Abdulaziz Public Library) 99. Chauvin XI, 169 (p. 46). pkpk
 

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364 [WWI - Arabian Gulf Operations]. Despatches Regarding Operations in the Persian Gulf and in Mesopotamia. London, Darling & Son, 1915. Folio. 54 pp. Sewn.
  € 950
Military reports from East India, issued by Generals W. S. Delamain, A. A. Barrett, and J. E. Nixon between 1914 and 1915, in the early months of the British Empire's Mesopotamian campaign against the Ottoman Empire. - Perfectly preserved. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 44868586.
 

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365 Zwemer, Samuel M[arinus] and Amy E. Zigzag Journeys in the Camel Country. Arabia in Picture and Story. New York etc., Fleming H. Revell Co., (1911). 8vo. 125 pp. With frontispiece, 15 plates and several text illustrations (including a map of the Gulf coast and the first page of a Quran). Original illustrated cloth.
  € 950
First edition of this account of travel through the Arabian desert. - S. M. Zwemer (1867-1952), the "Apostle to Islam", was a missionary at Basra, Bahrain, and at other locations in Arabia from 1891 to 1905. He was a member of the Arabian Mission (1890-1913) and served in Egypt from 1913 to 1929. He also traveled widely in Asia Minor and was elected a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society of London. - A good, clean copy without the front flyleaf. (more)
  ¶ Macro, Bibliography of the Arabian Peninsula, 2379. OCLC 5163501.
 

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366 Abd al-Latif al-Baghdadi, Muwaffaq al-Din. Abdollatiphi Historiae aegypti compendium, arabice et latine. Oxford, J. Cooke, Hanwell & Parker, 1800. Small folio (226 x 268 mm). (18), (V)-XXXII, 321, (55) pp. Contemp. full calf with later rebacked giltstamped spine.
  € 4,500
Abd al-Latif's graphic and detailed "Account of Egypt" in the original Arabic, here edited with a Latin translation (based on that of Edward Pococke the younger) by Joseph White (1745-1814). The Baghdad-born Abd al-Latif (1162-1231), a celebrated physician, historian, Egyptologist and traveller, was one of the most voluminous writers of the Near East in his time. One of the earliest works on Egyptology, this crucial work contains detailed descriptions of ancient Egyptian monuments, as well as a vivid description of a famine caused, during the author's residence in Egypt, by the Nile failing to overflow its banks. On this occasion Al-Latif had opportunity to observe and examine a large number of corpses - one of the earliest examples of a postmortem autopsy. - The Arabic manuscript was discovered in 1665 by Edward Pococke and preserved at the Bodleian Library. Pococke published the Arabic manuscript in the 1680s, and his son translated the work into Latin, though he was only able to publish less than half of his work. In 1800, Joseph White published it (with his own additions) in this present edition, which was then translated into French by De Sacy in 1810. - Bookplate of the City of York Public Library on front pastedown; small stamp of the Yorkshire Philosophical Society on title page. A good, clean, and wide-margined copy. (more)
  ¶ GAL I, p. 632. Schnurrer 153. Ibrahim-Hilmy I, 3. Brunet I, 9. Graesse I, 3. NYPL Arabia coll. 18. OCLC 31486913.
 

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367 Abu al-Fida Isma`il ibn `Ali. Albulfedae tabula Syriae cum excerpto geographico ex Ibn Ol Wardii geographia et historia naturali. Arabice nunc primum edidit, latine vertit, notis explanavit Io. Bernhardus Koehler. Leipzig, Schönermarck, 1766. Large 4to. (34), 240 pp. Near-contemporary marbled grey boards with giltstamped red spine label.
  € 2,800
First separate edition of this important mediaeval geography of the Middle East, concentrating on Syria. Printed in Latin and Arabic parallel text; edited with an extensive commentary by the versatile oriental scholar J. B. Köhler (1742-1802). Abu'l-Fida, born in Damascus in 1273, was a historian, geographer, military leader, and sultan. The crater Abulfeda on the Moon is named after him. - Extremeties rubbed and bumped. Insignificant browning throughout; ink marginalia by a mid-19th-c. owner, probably the Hamburg theologian and educator Carl Bertheau (1806-86), whose bookplate is on the front pastedown. (more)
  ¶ GAL II, p. 57. Ebert 29. Hamberger/Meusel IV, 189. ADB XVI, 444.
 

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368 Abu al-Fida Isma`il ibn `Ali. Vie de Mohammed. Texte arabe d'Abou'lféda, accompagnié d'une traduction française et de notes par A. Noël des Vergers. Paris, Imprimerie Royale, 1837. 8vo. 2 parts in one volume. X, 160 pp. (4), 120 pp. Contemp. blindstamped calf, sparsely gilt.
  € 4,500
Only printed edition of this mediaeval biography of the Prophet, "Mukhtasar tarikh al-bashar". Abu'l-Fida, born in Damascus in 1273, was a historian, geographer, military leader, and sultan. The crater Abulfeda on the Moon is named after him. - Includes an annotated French translation by Adolphe Noël des Vergers (1805-67). Binding slightly chafed; lower joint repaired. Slight foxing near beginning and end with occasional browning. A very appealingly bound set. (more)
  ¶ GAL II, p. 56. Chauvin XI, 2. Gay 3614. Silvestre de Sacy 1489. Hoefer XXXVIII, 184. Brunet I, 18. Graesse I, 8.
 

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369 Abu Shuja` al-Isfahani, Ahmad ibn al-Husayn. Précis de jurisprudence musulmane selon le rite Châfeite, par Abou Chodjâ'. Publication du texte arabe, avec traduction et annotations, par Dr. S. Keijzer. Leiden, E. J. Brill, 1859. 8vo. XXXII, (48), 117 pp. Contemp. half calf with giltstamped spine title.
  € 350
First publication of Abu-Chodja's work on Islamic law, one of the most important scriptures for the Shafi'i School. With a translation and annotations of the ethnologist Salomo Keizer, who is also known for his Dutch Quran translation. The French translation follows the Arabic text (with separate page count). - Evenly browned throughout. (more)
  ¶ GAL I, p. 492. Gay 3348. OCLC 11386640.
 

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370 Adler, Jacob Georg Christian. Novi Testamenti versiones Syriacae simplex, Philoxeniana et Hierosolymitana. Copenhagen, Johann Friedrich Schultz f. Christian Gottlieb Proft, 1789. Large 4to. (8), 206, (4) pp. With 8 engraved plates. Contemp. full calf with giltstamped cover borders and giltstamped red label to gilt spine.
  € 1,800
Only edition. - The theologian J. G. Ch. Adler (1756-1834) had spent a long time in Rome and visited Europe's great libraries. During his scholarly journeys he had immersed himself in Greek and oriental manuscripts, studying especially the Syrian documents with a view to Biblical textual criticism. One of the scientific results of his labours is the present study: "notes regarding the manuscript Syriac translations so important for New Testament criticism" (cf. ADB). The plates show specimens from the Syrian manuscripts. - Evenly browned throughout with occasional insignificant staining. Appealingly bound. (more)
  ¶ Hamberger/Meusel I, 29. ADB I, 86. Silvestre de Sacy 704. Darlow/Moule 8975 (note.). OCLC 5987315.
 

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The biography of Tamerlane, printed in Arabic
371 Ahmad ibn Muhammad (ibn 'Arabshah) / Golius, Jacob (ed.). [Kitab 'Aja'ib al-maqdur fi aghbar Timur]. Ahmedis arabsiadae vitae et rerum gestarum Timuri, qui vulgo Tamerlanes dicitur, historia. Leiden, Elsevier, 1636. 4to. (8), 448 pp. T. p. in Latin and Arabic printed in red and black within architectural woodcut border by Christoffel van Sichem; Latin half title printed in blue and red; editor's letter to the reader printed in red, blue, and black. (Bound with) II: Dieu, Ludovic de. Rudimenta linguae persicae. Ibid., 1639. (8), 95, (1) pp. T. p. printed in red and black. Contemp. vellum with ms. title to spine.
  € 18,500
I: First Arabic edition of this important eyewitness account of the life of Tamerlane (Timur Lenk), the successful and barbaric Turkish conqueror in the 14th century, printed entirely in Arabic. "An interesting feature of the book is the use of blue ink for the printing of the word 'Tamerlanis' (between two red lines) on the half-title, as well as for one typographical ornament on leaf 3 recto" (Smitskamp). Based on the original Arabic manuscript completed in 1437-38 by the Syrian author Ahmad lbn 'Arabshah who was secretary to Sultan Ahmad of Baghdad. In the late 16th century Timur was made famous in Europe through Christopher Marlowe's play "Tamburlaine" (published in 1590). - The present work was edited by Jacob Golius and includes a preface by him. The Arabic manuscript he used is still preserved at Leiden University library and contains many notes in his hand. A French translation by Pierre Vattier appeared in 1658. - II: First edition of the first Persian grammar ever printed (Willems notes that Raimondi, in 1614, produced a grammar in Rome for the use of missionaries which remained virtually unknown in the west, but this existed only in manuscript [cf. Smitskamp 310]). "De Dieu's most striking performance" (Smitskamp). The grammars of Ignazio di Gesù (Rome 1661) and of Labrosse (Amsterdam 1684) were largely based on his work. "The two chapters from Genesis are taken from a complete transcription in Arabic characters after the Hebrew-printed Persian text was published by Soncino in Istanbul in 1546" (Smitskamp). - Several contemporary marginal notes in the text; old table of Persian alphabet on endpapers, as well as an old ms. note reproducing Pietro Della Valle's remarks on the Persian language. A very clean, attractive copy. The Life of Tamerlane, especially, is extremely rare: the last copy on the market was the Burrell copy in 1999 (sold at Sotheby's for £8,400). (more)
  ¶ I: GAL S II, p. 25. Willems 434. Smitskamp 313. Schnurrer 166. Lambrecht 1774. Fück 81f. De Nave 90. - II: Willems 477. Smitskamp 310, 312. Berghman 674. Schwab II, 727. pkpk
 

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372 Ahteri, Mustafa bin Semseddin. Ahter-i kebir. Arapçadan Türkçeye lügat. [Istanbul], Matbaa-i Elhac Muharrem, 1292 AH (1875 AD). Folio (239 x 320 mm). 2 parts in one vol. 394 pp. 383, (1) pp. Contemporary giltstamped brown full calf with fore-edge flap.
  € 450
Early Arabic-Turkish dictionary completed in 1545 in Kütahya, Turkey, and first published in Constantinople in 1826. - Binding rubbed, giltstamping largely oxydized; interior a little browned due to paper. A good copy. (more)
  ¶ OCLC 22445320. Not in Zaunmüller or Vater/Jülg.
 

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First printing
373 Ibn Ajurrum, Muhammad. Kitab al-Ajurrumiya fi al-nahw. [Rome, Typographia Medicea, 1592]. 4to. 12 ff., printed in red and black throughout. Modern vellum. In elaborate custom-made wooden coffer.
  € 30,000
First printing of this synoptic, extremely rare grammar of Arabic, composed by the Arabian grammarian Abu Abdallah Mohammed ibn Mohammed ibn Dawud ibn Adjurrum es-Sanhadji (1273-1323) of Morocco and printed at the Medicean Press, founded in 1584 by Cardinal Ferdinando I de’ Medici and directed by Giambattista Raimondi (1536-1614), an able scholar of Arabic. Ibn Ajurrum's grammar (in full "Al-Muqadimma al-Adjurrumiya fi Mabadi Ilm al-Arabiya", but commonly known simply as "al-Ajurrumiyya") went through twelve different European versions and editions. - A wide-margined copy, generously printed in 13 lines per page. An exceptionally appealing typographical achievement. (more)
  ¶ GAL S II, p. 332. BM-STC Italian 456. Adams M 1891 (both s. v. Muhammad ibn Muhammad). Edit 16, CNCE 65819. Schnurrer 43. Not in Smitskamp.
 

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Arabian astrology, printed in 1482: the art of foretelling the destinies of newborns
374 Al-Qabisi, Abu Al Saqr 'Abd Al-'Aziz Ibn 'Uthman Ibn 'Ali (Alchabitius). Libellus ysagogicus. Venice, Erhard Ratdolt, 16. I. 1482. 4to. 32 ff. Title page printed in red and black. With 2 woodcut diagrams and 8 tables in the text; white-vine initials in two sizes, lombardic initials (many coloured in red). Rubricated. Recent full vellum.
  € 45,000
Second edition of the author's principal work, originally published at Mantua in 1473. Al-Qabisi (also known as "Alchabitus" in the Latin tradition) flourished in Aleppo, Syria, in the middle of the 10th century. Although his education was primarily in geometry and astronomy, his principal surviving treatise, "Madkhal" (here in the Latin translation of Joanis Hispalensis prepared in 1144), is an introductory exposition of some of the fundamental principles of genethlialogy (the astrological science of casting nativities, or divination as to the destinies of newborns). The "Madkhal" in its Latin version was published many times in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. - Bookplate of joint collectors Rudolf Hugo Driessen (1873-1957) and Caroline E. F. Kleyn (1883-1933). Outer margin of first leaf slightly frayed; marginal annotation in red ink on its verso (slightly trimmed by binder's knife). Very rare; last sold at an international auction in 1996. (more)
  ¶ HC 616*. Goff A-362. GW 843. Essling 294. Sander 216. Sajó-Soltész 120. Walsh 1804. Oates 1747. Proctor 4382. BMC V 285, XII, 19. BSB-Ink A-232. Cf. Scientific Treasures, p. 31 (ed. 1512).
 

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The "greatest of astrologers"
375 Albohazen Hall (Abul Hasan Ali ibn abi Rijal). Haly de iuditiis. Preclarissimus in juditiis astrorum Albohazen Haly filius Abenragel. Noviter impressus et fideliter emendatus etc. (Venice, Lucantonio de Giunta), 2. I. 1520. Folio (213 x 287 mm). 107 ff. (lacking final blank). Printed in double column. Title with large woodcut, woodcut diagram, decorative initials and printer's device to foot of final f. Modern blind-tooled calf with gilt spine.
  € 15,000
A rare and early edition of this elaborate system of astrology, edited by Bartholomäus Alten. Abul Hasan Ali ibn abi Rijal (Albohazen Hall), probably born in Cordoba, flourished in Tunis from c. 1020 to 1040. He wrote an elaborate system of astrology, the "Distinguished Book on Horoscopes from the Constellations". He enjoyed a great reputation and was celebrated as "Ptolemaeus Alter" and as "summus astrologus". His work was translated from Arabic into Castilian by Judah ben Moses, upon orders of King Alfonso X of Spain, and - in 1485 - from the Castilian into Latin, by Aegidius de Tebaldis and Petrus de Regio. - 1601 ownership to title page. Repairs to lower corner of title (just touching minor part of border) and A2 (loss of a few letters). Lower corner waterstained. Lower corners a little frayed, repair to inner margin of last few ff., some spotting. Not in auction records of the past three decades; only three complete copies in institutional libraries worldwide (BSB Munich, Württ. Landesbibliothek Stuttgart, UB Erlangen-Nürnberg); the copy in the Bibliothèque interuniversitaire de médecine Paris is incomplete (a mere 98 ff.). (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 814. OCLC 311395050. Not in Adams. Not in BM-STC Italian.
 

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The earliest Syrian and Armenian grammar printed
376 Albonesi, Teseo Ambrogio degli. Introductio in Chaldaicam lingua[m], Syriaca[m], atq[ue] Armenica[m], & dece[m] alias linguas. Pavia, G. M. Simonetta, 1539. 4to. 215 ff., 1 blank f. With woodcut title border and two nearly full-page woodcuts in the text. 19th century calf (restored), sparsely gilt.
  € 28,000
First edition, first issue ("Kal. Martij", f. 213v). "The earliest Syrian and Armenian grammar printed" (IA). Extremely rare and early work of oriental studies, also important for the history of music due to the first illustrated description of the bassoon, which the author's uncle, Afranio degli Albonesi, had invented early in the century and had first demonstrated in 1532. - The canon regular Teseo Ambrogio degli Albonesi (often simply referred to as Ambrogio or Ambrosius; 1469-1540) taught the Syriac language. This introduction to the oriental languages - his only publication - is a mixture of lingustic treatise and a collection of exotic alphabets. If Albonesi's results are not in every case correct, they remain of great importance to the history of linguistic scholarship: the "Introductio" constitutes one of those works which inspired the budding discipline of comparative philology to undertake further research. "His work offers a detailed survey of the Syriac and Armenian languages from various points of view, and a short notice about the other exotic languages (Samaritan, Arabic, Coptic, Cyrillic, Ethiopic) - these languages are all discussed with examples written by hand in the earlier chapters, and throughout the work we find blank spaces where such words had still to be filled in" (Smitskamp).The blank spaces mentioned have all been filled in in ink by a contemporary hand. Appealingly bound by T. Laenger, Milano and interior in excellent condition throughout. (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 816. Adams A 957. Mortimer 20 (all citing the first impression). Without differentiation: BM-STC Italian 16. Eitner I, 91. MGG III, 1721. Smitskamp 240. IA 104.625. Brunet I, 229. Graesse I, 59.
 

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Key work of the Arab astrologer
377 Albumasar (Abu Ma'shar al-Balkhi Ja'Far ibn Muhammad). Introductorium in astronomiam Albumasaris abalachi octo continens libros partiales. (Venice, Giacomo Penzio for Melchiorre Sessa, 5 Sept 1506). 4to (210 × 150 mm). 64 unnumbered ff. With woodcut illustration on title, woodcut initials, astrological figures in the text, printer's mark on final leaf verso; complete with final blank. 19th-c. vellum with red and black morocco labels and gilt centre tools to spine.
  € 25,000
An attractive edition of this key astrological work. Of all the Arabic writers on astrology, the most imposing is Ja'far ibn Muhammad Abû Ma'shar al-Balkhî (c. 787-886), known in the West as Albumasar. The most notable astrological work ascribed to him is the "Prediction of Changes of Years and Births". A manuscript in Cairo titled "Kitab Akham al-Qiranat wa'l Kawakib wa'l Buruj al-Ithnay 'Ashra" (Book of Indication of Conjunction and Corrections of Stars with some other Stars) is very probably the same work (cf. B. A. Rosenfeld and E. Ihsanoglu, Mathematicians, Astronomers and other Scholars of Islamic Civilisation and their Works [Istanbul, 2003], no. 88, p. 34). This 12th-century Latin translation by John of Seville of his "al-Madkhal al-kabir ilá 'ilm ahkam al-nujum" (Great Introduction to the Science of Astrology) was first published at Augsburg, 1489. - Upon Sessa's well-known device, the famous bibliophile Bishop of Ely, John Moore, remarked: "Whenever you see a book with a cat and a mouse in the frontispiece, seize upon it: for the chances are three to four that it will be found both curious and valuable" (Fumagalli, 486). - Small early inkstamp on title; ms. index to binder's blanks at end; some early marginalia and underlinings in two distinct hands. Bookplate of William Stirling-Maxwell (1818-78), the Scottish historical writer, statesman, horse breeder, and collector. Vellum insignificantly darkened with dust, the occasional trivial mark internally; overall an excellent copy. (more)
  ¶ Edit 16, CNCE 822. Adams A 567. Isaac 12913. Gaselee, Early printed books in Corpus Christi Cambridge, 166. Graesse I, 60. Heritage Library, Scientific Treasures, p. 30.
 

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The first complete edition of the most influential work of Oriental fiction
378 Kitab Alf layla wa-layla. Vols. I and II. Bulaq, Matba`at Bulaq, 1251 AH [1835 AD]. Royal 8vo (270 x 200 mm). 710 pp. 620 pp. Printed in Arabic throughout, each page framed by double rules. With large woodcut vignettes on opening page. Original brown morocco with flap; blindstamped central ornament.
  € 450,000
The first complete edition of the Thousand and One Nights in the original Arabic; of the utmost rarity. Also "the oldest printed version of The Nights in Arabic by a non-European" (Wikipedia), preceded only by the 1814-1818 Calcutta edition, which was published by the British East India Company with an English title page and contained the first 200 'Nights' only. A complete Arabic edition of the Nights was begun by the EIC in 1839 and finished in 1842, but with the exception of the first 200 'Nights' already published, more than three quarters of that text were "printed directly or indirectly from the printed Bulaq text" (Grotzfeld, 73). The importance of the Bulaq edition as the final received corpus of the Arabian Nights cannot be overestimated: this first complete edition to be printed in the original language provides the culminating point of an oral and manuscript textual tradition reaching back more than a thousand years; until today all modern editions and translations are based on this corpus. "The earliest proof of the very existence of the work titled 'Alf layla' is the [9th century] paper fragment published by Nabbia Abott. The last decisive act in the textual history of the work now commonly known as the 'Thousand and One Nights' took place with the printed editions Bulaq 1835 and Calcutta 1839-42, which, by their wide distribution, put an end to the development of the work's Arabic text. In between these two points, there is a period of a thousand years during which the work has changed continually" (Marzolph, 51). Thus, even up to the present day "the first Bulaq edition (1835) gives the most trustworthy text" (Encyclopaedia Britannica [1952 ed.], XXII, 152). - For the present edition, the earliest ever printed and until today the most authoritative of the complete Arabic text, OCLC locates no more than 8 copies worldwide. No copies recorded at international auctions during the last decades; we are not aware of a single copy having appeared on the market within the last fifty years. - The appealing bindings are slightly rubbed; small defects to spine of vol. II. Interior of both volumes spotless and clean throughout. An outstanding, complete copy of the most desirable monument in the history of Arabic printing and literature. From the library of the Heidelberg linguist Hans J. Vermeer (1930-2010), father of the Skopos theory of translation. (more)
  ¶ Chauvin IV, 18, 20K. Brunet III, 1715. Graesse IV, 523. Fawzi M. Tadrus, Printing in the Arab World with emphasis on Bulaq Press (Doha: University of Qatar, 1982), p. 64. Middle Eastern Languages and the Print Revolution. A Cross-Cultural Encounter, Westhofen 2002, p. 184. Heinz Grotzfeld. Neglected Conclusions of the "Arabian Nights": Gleanings in Forgotten and Overlooked Recensions. In: Journal of Arabic Literature, Vol. 16, (1985), pp. 73-87. Ulrich Marzolph (ed.). The Arabian nights in transnational perspective, Wayne State University Press 2007, p. 51.
 

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First English translation
379 [Kitab Alf layla wa-layla - English]. Torrens, Henry (transl.). The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night: from the Arabic of the Aegyptian M.S. as edited by Wm. Hay Macnaghten, Esq. B.C.S. Done into English by Henry Torrens B.C.S. B.A. and of the Inner Temple. Vol. I [no more published]. Calcutta & London, W. Thacker & Co / W. H. Allen & Co., 1838. 8vo. (4), II pp. (2), III pp. VIII pp., 492 pp, XLVIII pp. With engr. title page and blue and red printed header to p. 1. Bound in contemporary half calf on marbled boards with gilt titles to spine, a clean and crisp copy.
  € 3,500
Rare first English translation of the "most complete" version of the Arabian Nights, that of the Egyptian manuscript tradition. "[U]ntil the one-volume translation of Henry Torrens appeared in 1838, Galland's work was the only version [of the Arabian Nights] known in England" (Shaw). However, unlike the later translations of Edward Lane, John Payne, and Richard Burton, Torrens's work is extremely scarce in the present day - no copies have been noted at auction since 1975. This is due partly to its printing in India, and partly to the fact that Torrens abandoned his project shortly after beginning the translation, based on the Egyptian ms. in the possession of his colleague Sir William MacNaghten. - The "Nights" have been often recognised as "the Islamic world's major contribution to world literature and an icon that has permeated literary imagery around the world" (Enc. of Islam), while Torrens's work has been highly praised by recent commentators for its sophisticated and sensitive rendering of the original Arabic: "Torrens's translation is a far more faithful rendering of the Arabic original (preserving, as it does, the spirit of the Orient and that most important feature of Arabic poetry, its rhyming-scheme) than Lane's more scholarly version, which renders Arabic verse into English prose" (Hawari). - Interestingly, whereas Edward Lane's translation "has done away with any such anecdotes and tales as are on any account objectionable", Torrens deals with the more explicit sexual subjects of the "Nights" by "omitting only the objectionable terms - not whole portions of tales". Rida Hawari of King Saud University, Riyadh, has in fact noted that Torrens's translation "sometimes imitates the essentially Arabian monorhyming technique and, by so doing, he gives a true impression of this difficult Arabian practice." - A fine copy from the estate of Clifton Hall, Staffordshire, and bearing the ownership inscription of Henry John Pye, Esq. (1802-84), son of poet laureate Henry James Pye. (more)
  ¶ E. Littman, "Alf Layla wa-Layla," The Encyclopaedia of Islam, New Ed., vol. I, fasc. 6 (Leiden, 1956), pp. 358-364. Rida Hawari, "The Cult of the 'Exotic' in Victorian Literature: the Ni